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Red Wine

Cheyenne's picture
Cheyenne
Posts: 72
Joined: Apr 2012

I was watching this movie, "K-19, the Widowmaker". I had seen it before a long time ago but this time something jumped out at me. When the crew was subjected to radioactivity, the captain ordered they be given red wine. So I looked it up a bit and it seems that there is some theory that red wine helps to prevent radiation poisoning. It specifically is supposed to help keep the bones from getting (their term) "cooked".

It made me curious because around the end of my third week of treatment I had my major meltdown (when I lost a lot of hair) and I said, "Forget it!". I started treating myself to a nightly glass of red wine. Now it might just be a coincidence but I had none of the fatigue, pain, and other issues that seem to be a part of this treatment. The rad oncologist actually shook his head in disbelief when he went through the list of problems and I answered no to everyone. I'm not suggesting that everyone goes out and starts drinking wine but has anyone else heard of this or had any experience with this?

Marynb
Posts: 1134
Joined: Aug 2012

I was told not to drink alcohol and to avoid all sugars. Wondering if anyone else was told the same?

I have not had a glass of wine since diagnosis and am under the impression that I never will again. I avoid all sugars. I wish I knew what to avoid.

I had none of the possible reacions either. I never got sick, never lost hair, no mouth sores. I joked that maybe they were giving me placebo until my white blood counts got very low and I got slammed! That happened twice.

tbend
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2012

i started

mp327's picture
mp327
Posts: 2949
Joined: Jan 2010

I have never heard this, but it will be worth looking into. I was never advised to avoid alcohol during treatment, but did so anyway. As we already know, red wine does have certain health benefits and I have resumed consumption of it since I finished treatment nearly 4 years ago. However, I still prefer tequila!

About sugar, I asked my medical oncologist about the importance of avoiding sugar, as I had heard that sugar feeds cancer. He basically told me it was just B.S. I don't know. I do know that I consume much less sugar these days than I did prior to diagnosis. I'm just trying to eat healthier overall and I believe that cutting back on sugar is near the top of the list.

eihtak
Posts: 850
Joined: Oct 2011

Most of my adult life I have enjoyed a variety of wines in moderation. Often weeks to months with only a glass or two, yet truely savor the sips. I have read too many documented articles about even small amounts (like half a glass a week) drastically increasing the chance of breast cancer (I am not only recovering from anal cancer, but had a double mastectomy for BC 5months ago) so it now makes me wonder the effects on other cancers. So much money is put into breast cancer research that it is sometimes a few years before the info pours over to other cancers also. I did have literally 3 sips with a special dinner a few times since, but then loaded up on veges the next day in a mental attempt to rid my body of poison (lol). There of course is a lot of wrong info out there, but I am very aware of what goes into my body now and alcohol is low on my list. I would assume that the benefits from red wine are truely from the dark fruit (grapes, blueberries, elderberries, ect.)

RoseC's picture
RoseC
Posts: 503
Joined: Jun 2011

I've often heard of the many benefits of red wine, in moderation of course. I can't drink wine though - first, I can't stop at one glass and second, it gives me the runs. But in a similar vein (and there may be no official healthful benefit in this), I truly find a couple of beers helps both my digestion and regularity. I don't think there's a site in the world out there that'll ever actually recommend this, but I know it helps keep my system feeling better.

sandysp's picture
sandysp
Posts: 811
Joined: May 2011

It's not regulated. Who knows what is in it. American beer has a lot of preservatives and made me get hyper so I used to drink only Foreign beer but found German beer to be too salty. Unfortunately, California wine, although I am sure it may have had to do with the price point, never sat well with my already acidic self. I really liked Spanish wines, but like so many others, when I really like something I partake too much of it. Sick and in pain before I was diagnosed, I went on Lyrica which required me to give up drinking. I am still on Lyrica and don't miss alcohol and I would like to keep my liver, please! All that chemo and radiation could not possibly have been good for it.

Marynb
Posts: 1134
Joined: Aug 2012

Hi Sandy,

I have been wondering about feeling acidic. Do you know anything about this?

sandysp's picture
sandysp
Posts: 811
Joined: May 2011

I don't think being acidic is a good thing. We should all be drinking apple cider vinegar before bed. Which tastes like it's acidic but turns to alkaline in our systems. I have heard that cancer can't live in a body that is acid neutral or alkaline. I love my ice tea and believe that contributes to the acidic body. Good luck! Sandy

Marynb
Posts: 1134
Joined: Aug 2012

I wish that I knew of one source to go to that discusses the currently accepted research on diet and cancer. The nurtitionist at the hospital said she could only use evidence based information and basically, there was no information that passed that threshold. All she could discuss with me was foods to alleviate diarreah and the USA food pyramid.

Does anyone know af a scientifically accepted source for dietary information? I would like to explore this idea about acidity.

sandysp's picture
sandysp
Posts: 811
Joined: May 2011

I don't think being acidic is a good thing. We should all be drinking apple cider vinegar before bed. Which tastes like it's acidic but turns to alkaline in our systems. I have heard that cancer can't live in a body that is acid neutral or alkaline. I love my ice tea and believe that contributes to the acidic body. Good luck! Sandy

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