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debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 755
Joined: Sep 2011

Just what is the second most aggresive uterine cancer? I have 1a UPSC(Ithink) but never graded...was just told I had the second most aggressive kind. Just currious. Best, debrajo

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

is grade 3.

debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 755
Joined: Sep 2011

Thanks! Kind of thought so, but I kept seeing MMMT and other names and was gettng confused since no one ever told me and it is not in any of my medical records. Best, debrajo p.s. what is the most agressive?

debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 755
Joined: Sep 2011

Thanks Daisy,Jazzy, Sue, and Snowbird for all the info! WOW, NONE of it sounds good, so as one of my dau.-in-law's from S. Carolina says, Mama! It is what it is! Like Jazzy, I am going to do the best I can with what I have...Heck, if the Mayans' are right we only have til Dec.21, 2012 anyway! Best, Debrajo

SettledSue
Posts: 18
Joined: May 2012

UPSC, MMMT, and clear cell (which I have) are all Grade 3, agressive cancers. There may be some difference in the agressiveness among these three, but it is hard to tell, because in many studies they are all grouped together as Grade 3 cancers. My oncologist says not enough research has been done on any of them. He said it isn't even known whether six rounds of chemo do any more good than four. In my case he is aiming for six but may consider stopping at four. I will have my first one on June 14th.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

best wishes to you & smooth sailing on this journey!

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

One appt with my oncologist I did ask more about aggressiveness of both these types of uterine cancers (FYI I've got MMMMT, stage 3c). Doc gave his medical terminology on both and at the end of his talk, asked him which is more aggressive???? Response, both are very aggressive, just different types.

Interesting, but in the end, I've got what I've got and all I can do is put one foot in front of the other and fight like hell to keep this devil (Chester in Mary Ann's case) at bay.

Thanks team warriors~
Jan

debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 755
Joined: Sep 2011

Don't know where you get your treatment from (I'm at MD Anderson in Houston, Texas), but since it is aggressive my dr.'s wanted to hit it hard and fast(I really wasn't given an option)so I had the six treatments of taxol and carboplatin plus five internal radiations. What are your particulars? They may determine how many you have plus you blood counts. My counts never went down enough to make the dr.'s hold off on treatments. Lost hair and had aches from the waist down, but no biggie. You will do fine and I will be thinking of you on June 14th! Best, debrajo

SettledSue
Posts: 18
Joined: May 2012

Thanks, Debrajo. I go to an oncologist in New Jersey. I already had three internal radiation treatments with no side effects and had no complications from surgery even though I had the long vertical incision. I hear so many different things about chemo, both online and from people I know. The most recent advice I got was to take any anti nausea medication I am given even if I don't feel nauseus. Do you have any more tips? Thanks.

debrajo's picture
debrajo
Posts: 755
Joined: Sep 2011

I Had the looooog vertical incision also, but it wasn't bad since they went into the same long incision from two c-sections. I am almost embarrassed to admit, but I never had any nausea! They gave me comprazine and zolefram(sp) and I did take them as I left the hospital after the first chemo, but after the first one I didn't take them after chemo anymore. I ran across the pills the other day, still full. They tell you to eat whatever you want and give you steroids to boost that. But eating health is key if you have a weight problem...I gained 30 pounds I CANNOT lose! Fear is a BIG defeater...it will comsume you. Please don't look at "the big picture"! Take one baby step at a time. I am a hard stick and that was the worst for me. With only six treatments to get through I didn't get a port. If that is a problem, ask for a port or go to the infussion center to start your IV. That's all they do and they are really good! Also, tell the tec they get two sticks,then you want a supervisor to do it.The chemo will make you bald so if you are sensitive about that, go now and get a wig and start wearing it so people get use to it now and most wont even know you are going through chemo. There is soooo much more...ask me, ask us, all the questions you want. I am up late every night so leave me a post and more than likely I will answer right away! Best, debrajo

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snowbird_11's picture
snowbird_11
Posts: 160
Joined: Oct 2011

Debrajo, Here is some info from cancer.gov site re tumor grades and, as well, the types of endometrial cancer cells, with the statistical percentage of occurrence.

Unfortunately, any malignant cancer, regardless of grade, can metastasize. Such metastases can be such that they cause more or less immediate impact to health - such as immediate spread to critical organs or development of isolated tumors not impacting body functioning. There is no way to predict how cancers will behave. Nor is there any way to predict how any other health issue or unfortunate life event can impact out lives at any time. So live and enjoy each day as it comes ;-) Hope this info helps- links to website included:

Tumor Grade:
Based on the microscopic appearance of cancer cells, pathologists commonly describe tumor grade by four degrees of severity: Grades 1, 2, 3, and 4. The cells of Grade 1 tumors resemble normal cells, and tend to grow and multiply slowly. Grade 1 tumors are generally considered the least aggressive in behavior.

Conversely, the cells of Grade 3 or Grade 4 tumors do not look like normal cells of the same type. Grade 3 and 4 tumors tend to grow rapidly and spread faster than tumors with a lower grade.

The American Joint Committee on Cancer recommends the following guidelines for grading tumors (1):

Grade
GX Grade cannot be assessed (Undetermined grade)
G1 Well-differentiated (Low grade)
G2 Moderately differentiated (Intermediate grade)
G3 Poorly differentiated (High grade)
G4 Undifferentiated (High grade)

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Detection/tumor-grade

Cellular Classification of Endometrial Cancer:

The most common endometrial cancer cell type is endometrioid adenocarcinoma, which is composed of malignant glandular epithelial elements; an admixture of squamous metaplasia is not uncommon. Adenosquamous tumors contain malignant elements of both glandular and squamous epithelium;[1] clear cell and papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium are tumors that are histologically similar to those noted in the ovary and the fallopian tube, and the prognosis is worse for these tumors.[2] Mucinous, squamous, and undifferentiated tumors are rarely encountered. Frequency of endometrial cancer cell types is as follows:

Endometrioid (75%–80%).
Ciliated adenocarcinoma.
Secretory adenocarcinoma.
Papillary or villoglandular.
Adenocarcinoma with squamous differentiation.
Adenoacanthoma.
Adenosquamous.
Uterine papillary serous (<10%).
Mucinous (1%).
Clear cell (4%).
Squamous cell (<1%).
Mixed (10%).
Undifferentiated.

http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/endometrial/HealthProfessional/page2

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