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Vitamix

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Well, I've taken the plunge and ordered a Vitamix. There's no way in the world that I am going to eat my veggies. I know that for a fact. I am hoping that making a drink out of them, so I can chug-a-lug it and get it over with, may be the answer. So if anybody has any recipes that might work for, say, a 10-year-old who gags on most veggies, please let me know.

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Mike, it will come with a useful manual and recipe selection so don't worry too much. As a recent purchaser and already an enthusiastic user, I can vouch that you have made a very good decision which will do your health no end of good. Several older hands here, like Jennifer, will be able to give you lots of great ideas. Enjoy it.

livealive's picture
livealive
Posts: 127
Joined: Feb 2012

I eat my vegetables, do I Need this machine ?

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
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Joined: Nov 2011

No, you don't. You're fine already.

But it does make it easy to create delicious smoothies and lovely soups etc.

(Raj, I'm assuming that as well as a good range of veggies you also eat plenty of fruit. Is that correct? If not, please do and there a Vitamix might help. I've just knocked up a smoothie of banana, apple, grapes and spinach - very tasty and good food value.)

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Tex, that smoothie sounds delicious ... if we get rid of that last ingredient.
One evening during dinner, about 55 years ago, I sneaked the canned spinach (yecch!) from my plate and put it in some tissues and put that in my pocket. (My mother used to let me eat in front of the TV to watch the Mickey Mouse Club so it was easy to do.) I planned to flush it right after dinner. It was an old trick that had worked for me many times before. This time, however, my father was spending too much time in the john and my pocket was bulging. I panicked and and tossed it into the top shelf of my parents' bedroom closet. Two years later my mother found it. She called me into the room and asked me what it was. I said, "It looks like spinach." "How did it get there?" she asked. I answered, "Maybe it was there when we moved in." She laughed and I got off scot free. But I wouldn't hesitate to do that again if my wife ever made me spinach.

rae_rae's picture
rae_rae
Posts: 273
Joined: Oct 2010

I personally gag on cooked spinach but happily stuff two large fitsfulls in my vitamix. It ends up green but with the fruit combination you cannot taste the spinach. Honest. And spinach is incredibly good for you. I toss in things like carrots, broccoli, celery etc. In with my fruit. You will love this machine. I Google vitamix recipes and there is a vitamix community on Facebook.

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Do you guys use organic fruit and vegetables? Or just the average supermarket variety? The former is very expensive and the latter is inundated with pesticides and other chemicals, I'm sure.

rae_rae's picture
rae_rae
Posts: 273
Joined: Oct 2010

I don't have a preference. Organic is expensive. As it is, buying the vast amount of produce that I consume now gets expensive but worth it. I've lost 13 pounds and find that I make a conscious effort to eat better whether at home or at a restaurant.

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
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Joined: Nov 2011

What a great story Mike.

It takes all sorts - I eat spinach almost every day. I love it. I eat it in smoothies, I eat it raw, in salads or on its own and I cook it a couple of times a week, usually with fillet steak and french fries. It's an excellent food and it turns any smoothie green, no matter what else is in it, even if you don't use much, and green is my favourite colour.

Well done on the weight loss Rae - always assuming you are better off a bit lighter. In the UK, 'organic' has been a good selling point though there's been a bit of a backlash of cynicism as to what it sometimes amounts to, after the odd expose. Is that the same Statesside? Must agree that the agri-chemicals problem is a real one.

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 2030
Joined: Oct 2011

I can drink a ton of V8 every day. Plus I love my veggies. Can't get enough brocolli or cauliflower. Or Corn or beats, ( love beats) or......love it all. To bad I like hamburgers and pizza too. As a matter of fact, I like almost everything. It is a good thing I push myself to exercise or I would be a beach ball.

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Watch out for that sodium, Fox! I drink a glass of low-sodium V8 every day. It took me a while to get used to the taste of vegetable juice but I don't mind it so much any more. I chug-a-lug it, of course, after putting a load of pepper in it.

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Tex,
All that spinach! You and Popeye! What's wrong with your taste buds? One time my wife and I and some other couples got invited to somebody's house after church to have "pie." I went gladly. When I got there, I found out their idea of "pie" was spinach quiche. I tried to convince my wife to eat my portion as well as hers but she refused. I took a bite, gagged, spit it out in the bathroom and meekly returned it to the hostess. Probably one of the most embarrassing moments in my life. Even the fear of being rude didn't stop me. That's how much I hate spinach.

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 2030
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Yum! Love spinach...Mike you are right about the sodium. After last weeks good news on my response to the MDX, I need to work on doing many things healthier.

livealive's picture
livealive
Posts: 127
Joined: Feb 2012

So yes, I do some fruits, mostly some berries in the morning, and sometimes my wife brings me papaya, etc. I don't think I eat as health as the rest of you or make that much of an effort. (I had a 2 scoops of Gelato today, still feeling guilty). I have an old juicer, 15 years old, continues to serve the purpose, so unless I hear otherwise, I am not buying the Vita thing. TW has already endorsed I eat OK, I will take hid word for it and hope the Gelato doesn't do any harm.

I think all of us should have garlic and turmeric in the kitchen. Google for recipes, or I can write some here - Dal (Lentils, legumes), chic-peas, black-eyed peas, "kidney" beans (no pun intended).

Try some "chana masala", heat 1 tbsl olive oil, add diced onions, chopped garlic, chopped ginger, add a green chili or 2, cook until brown, add turmeric, cumin, some salt, add water (don't ask me quantities, I never measure), now add the pre-soaked chic peas (soak overnight), pressure cook, it's what my wife and mother do.

Spinach recipe, if you'll know what paneer is - look for Paalak Paneer (spinach and cubes of cottage cheese).

Fox, from where you were to where you are, the sodium thing should be a cake-walk, minus the sugar, fat, cream, and sodium. "Maybe" try one meal completely without salt, the next time you will appreciate less salt. I have cut back the salt, now restaurant food is too salty, before I used to add salt to their food.

Fox / TW, your spirit is an inspiration. I have felt a sense of community here, and I am grateful for the help you'll provide.

Thanks.

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

I'm relieved that Mike has cleared up a point for me - I'd assumed that the V8 Fox guzzles was a brand of engine oil.

Mike, I'm guessing you're not a brassica fan either, on taste grounds. I can't get enough broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, raw cabbage, kale, spring greens, etc etc and I'd jump at a spinach or a broccoli quiche anytime, but then I'm a bit like Fox, a natural born omnivore, although I draw the line at things like peanut butter - how anyone could even put anything so revolting in their mouth beats me. (I presume it's also responsible for a lot of cases of sensitivity leading to anaphylactic shock.)

Raj, thanks for the recipe which I may try sometime. Two favourite dishes of mine are saag aloo and saag gosht (the latter of which obviously you wouldn't eat). Two of the places we like to eat at in Edinburgh are Indian vegetarian restaurants.

When you opt for a low salt diet it's a bit restricting on where you can eat out because you realise with horror how much salt so many restaurants put in their dishes.

What is Gelato?

garym's picture
garym
Posts: 1651
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I believe I would have starved to death by now if not for peanut butter, so thems fightin' words...try some in a smoothie sometime, might change your mind.

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Love peanut butter. Have for decades. A big source of protein for me.

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
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I don't know what to say - happens occasionally :)

foxhd's picture
foxhd
Posts: 2030
Joined: Oct 2011

I can honestly say that I am eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwhich at this very moment.
Motor oil!..I might try that. Is it sodium free? And yes. I WILL be much more careful with my diet. I tend to do things in trends. Since I am currently doing well and exercising pretty hard, cleaning up my diet is next. It gets so much easier in the summer for me.

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Tex,
Gelato is an Italian dessert dish, in the ice cream family, but lower in fat. Never tried it. I like the real stuff. You can't get enough broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, cabbage, etc? I wish I had your taste buds. I know that stuff is great for you, but the thought of them makes me gag. I'm hoping the Vitamix will help control that reflex action.
Mike

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Thanks for the info Mike. I must say i like 'the real stuff'. I hate the sort of very strongly flavoured sorbets and water ices popular in Europe. Fortunately in Scotland we have a great tradition of Italo-Scots fish and chip shops and ice-cream parlours. Locally we have a family who have both in adjacent premises with a very inventive spectrum of flavours of the real stuff.

The Vitamix will do the job for you and you'll find ways of packing in the good veggies in a palatable way with fruits, nuts and seeds if you choose to. By the way, you may not know that you can also use it to make your own ice-cream. How about a lovely green spinach ice-cream?

Fishknees
Posts: 73
Joined: Mar 2012

If you are interested in some Vitamix recipes and watching some videos, sign up for VitaMix lady website. She is a demonstrator and has some wonderful videos and her website has many good recipes. You do have to adjust the recipes somewhat because they are higher in calories than I like. Very informative website. Enjoy.

One Lucky Girl's picture
One Lucky Girl
Posts: 68
Joined: Feb 2012

Peas! Yuck!!! Mike, I have the same story except it was peas (which have always made me gag) and that tissue wad found its way between the couch cushions at my friend's house, where I forgot it. Must've been quite a discovery ;-).

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Lucky Girl,
I'd feel sorry for anybody who invited you and me to dinner. who knows where they would find the food?
Peas. The second worst tasting vegetable.

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Peas do seem to divide opinion a bit sharply. I love them but my Wife can't stand them, except for fresh garden peas which she actually enjoys eating raw, so long as they're freshly shucked (by me :( ). OK then, Mike, I won't bother to let you have a lovely recipe calling for yogurt with cucumber, spinach and peas.

Since you're even newer to Vitamix culture than I am, I feel I must warn you of a smoothie hazard I've learnt the hard way. Depending on the constituents and how long you leave your masterpiece to stand, some of the constituents can start to settle out. I've had the experience of taking a sip, finding a thick top layer has formed with hidden, rather more liquid levels below, and tipping my glass more steeply - danger, danger, danger - the runnier lower levels then burst through the stiffer top layer and your lovely smoothie descends down the outside of your body rather than the intended inside of your body!! Fruit juices are often bad staining agents too, so a rapid striptease may be called for. Be warned.

One Lucky Girl's picture
One Lucky Girl
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Well wouldn't we be just quite the trio! Little bits of rotting food hidden around (maybe to be found during an Easter-egg hunt?) and Tex with drooly smoothie down his shirt :-). And here I was thinking of myself as rather elegant ;-).

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Yes, and anyone coming to this forum fearful of finding it just too gruesome would hereby find their worst fears realised!!

However, Billy Girl, I always picture you as elegance incarnate and it reminds me of a question that I hope you might be able to help me with, given your pursuit of physical perfection. I think Fox may also be well-placed to pass expert comment. I've been dabbling in some basic tai chi movements recently and it strikes me that quite a few moves are essentially the same as I perform with dumbbells, including the breathing patterns. My question is: wherein lies the benefit of the slow, gentle, graceful, flowing tai chi moves when I could be doing much the same with weights, thereby gaining much more in the way of strength and endurance?

Perhaps the comparison is specious but i liken it to the contrast between the incredibly gentle massage I've been directed to and benefited from at the hands of a physio and the benefit I've also derived from a swedish massage that had me just about screaming with pain.

[If anyone else here who's got relevant expertise can give me an educated answer on this I'd be grateful.]

One Lucky Girl's picture
One Lucky Girl
Posts: 68
Joined: Feb 2012

Hi Tex,

I myself have never tried tai chi, but I believe as an exercise form it has many benefits:

http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsletters/Harvard_Womens_Health_Watch/2009/May/The-health-benefits-of-tai-chi

In this article they mention that tai chi can be helpful in recovering from surgery. That makes sense, since it offers the opportunity to get the body moving without straining. Kind of wish I'd thought of it in the past few weeks. Perhaps tai chi could help you regain muscle tone and range of movement following your upcoming surgery once you are strong enough. Maybe it could even help get you back out on the links sooner. :-)

And do tai chi and weight training have to be mutually exclusive or could one practice tai chi on one day and do weight training on another for a cross-training benefit?

I think when it comes to exercise that we should choose a form that complements our current health situation and lifestyle. It is also important to choose fitness activities we enjoy and can fit into our daily routines. I myself have engaged in many types of fitness over the years: I was a swimming instructor/lifeguard as a teenager. In university I got my brown belt in karate. I have since traded karate bruises for power yoga -- my most strenuous workout of the week. Power yoga requires more strength and endurance than weight-lifting alone -- particularly as it challenges all of the muscles in my body to hold various poses and maintain balance.

I like participating in exercise classes for the social aspects, so my weekly routine consists of power yoga, step and dance aerobics and Pilates. I combine this with an active lifestyle that involves daily dog walking and hiking or skiing on sunny weekends. I wasn't always this physically active, but I discovered a passion for moving and simply 'feeling alive'. I will be starting back to aerobics tomorrow for the first time since my surgery 6 weeks ago and will try skiing next week (I have been walking every day since my 5th day post-op). I hope this all goes well and that my energy level doesn't fail me.

So... that's the best answer I can give without enrolling in tai chi! Perhaps there's someone on this board with more experience in the art.

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Well, my Vitamix arrived a few days ago and in place of my normal peanut butter sandwich for lunch, I made my first smoothie -- a receipe from the book that included fresh spinach, cucumber and frozen strawberries. While I wouldn't describe it as "delicious," at least it wasn't awful. After mixing, I added some hot black pepper and a dash of salt to help the taste a bit. I chug-a-lugged it and it was so cold from the frozen strawberries that I got one of the "ice cream headaches." Thank God, the strawberries were strong enough to camouflage the cucumber and spinach. My first "healthy" drink. I feel like a real grown-up! Now if I can only keep up with it.
Mike

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Disappointed it wasn't delicious, Mike. You maybe didn't use enough spinach? :)
Most commercial smoothies and many home recipes are based around apple and banana and those would also mask the flavour of most items that you might want to include but not to taste. They're good foods that give plenty of bulk at fairly low cost.
I've just made my first smoothie of the day with a granny smith apple, a small banana, 1/4 cantaloupe, fresh strawberries, fresh blueberries, a chunk of peeled fresh ginger and a large handful of curly kale, plus a mug full of ice - not bad at all. The ginger predominates but I'll enjoy 4 large glasses of it over the next hour or so.

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

For anyone wanting to get up to speed on the topic of dietary combat against cancer, you could do a lot worse than watch this very lucid and impressive video by William Li.

http://www.ted.com/talks/william_li.html?quote=724

I found his presentation very persuasive and brilliantly delivered. During the lecture, he showed a list of valuable foods. Below is the list. (By the way, very unusually, tomatoes are of greater value to us cooked than raw - I can't think of another food of which this is true, though there may be others?)

Angiogenesis inhibiting foods:

Green Tea
Strawberries
Blackberries
Raspberries
Blueberries
Oranges
Grapefruit
Lemons
Apples
Pineapple
Cherries
Red Grapes
Red Wine
Bok Choy
Kale
Soy Beans
Ginseng
Maitake Mushroom
Licorice
Tumeric
Nutmeg
Artichokes
Lavender
Pumkin
Sea Cucumber
Tuna
Parsley
Garlic
Tomato
Olive Oil
Grape Seed Oil
Dark Chocolate
Earl Grey Tea
Blend of Dragon Pearl Jasmine and Senchai (ie, a synergetic effect of food compounds exists)
Vitamin E

This thread seems to me to be a good spot to air this information since so many of the above foods are naturals for incorporation in smoothies [but where's the spinach, I ask myself]. It's notable how many of the foods listed are fruits. I was happy to see that most of them are elements of my own diet. I can't resist highlighting green tea, Earl Grey tea and red wine!

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Tex,
I would add walnuts to that list.
And by the way, I've spoken to the men in the white coats about your spinach obsession and they should arrive shortly to chauffeur you to the place with the iron fence so you can enjoy the company of other disturbed folks.
Mike

garym's picture
garym
Posts: 1651
Joined: Nov 2009

Hey... I haven't bought a Vitamix yet, but I did start drinking low sodium V8

It needs salt!

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

In a few days you won't notice that it needs salt. I tasted regular V8 the other day and I said to myself, this has too much salt.

If you'll notice, it's a bit thinner too. More watery it seems. Gotta shake it up real good, but it's hard to do that when the bottle is full. So when I first open a bottle, I usually pore out a glassful, then shake the bottle to give it a good mix and then pore a separate glassful which I drink and then pore the first glass back for the second shake later on. I should have been a rocket scientist.

Texas_wedge's picture
Texas_wedge
Posts: 2807
Joined: Nov 2011

Agreed Mike, also almonds and two of my great favourites pistachios and brazils (despite their radioactivity level).

Have you tried walnut and spinach curry - so delectable! They know the value of spinach on the Subcontinent - I'm just about to eat a saag masala over saffron rice for my main course.

I'm not sure whether I've just heard the first cuckoo of spring but the men in the van probably frightened it off.

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

Walnut and spinach curry? That's ungodly. I think if God wanted us to eat spinach he wouldn't have created pizza with pepperoni.

jam66
Posts: 55
Joined: Jun 2011

I've posted this video before, but it's worth a re-post. Kidney cancer is discussed, so we can single out the most important veggies to get in our diets....

http://nutritionfacts.org/videos/1-anticancer-vegetable/

Now, how can we get leeks into our smoothies? :)

Beingbless
Posts: 46
Joined: Mar 2012

All, I read this post and found the product of Vitamix pretty good and easy for my daily life once I get back to work. However, there are so many model and series, which one is good enough? Any advice?

Thank you.

MikeK703's picture
MikeK703
Posts: 235
Joined: Sep 2010

I'm too new to it all to make recommendations. I bought the Creations II model, a 48-oz. vs. the 64 oz. Creation model. I'd recommend going to Amazon.com and searching for Vitamix and read the reviews of the different models. I bought directly from the manufacturer, spending a bit more, because Amazon didn't carry this model and QVC didn't have any in stock and didn't know when they would.
Mike

DMike's picture
DMike
Posts: 241
Joined: Nov 2011

I don't own one, but the discussion here made me notice a reconditioned model was mentioned today on the slickdeals.net site. It's sold by Vitamix with a 5 year warranty.
https://secure.vitamix.com/reconditioned-blender-64oz-5yr-warranty.aspx
--David

Beingbless
Posts: 46
Joined: Mar 2012

Hi Mike and David, thanks for the info, I will check it out.

Thanks.

Beingbless
Posts: 46
Joined: Mar 2012

Mike, I watched Dr Fuhrman show, he had mentioned that there are food very high in pesticides, and it is important to buy them in organic.
Thought to share it here....

Here is the list:
Peaches
Strawberries
Apples
Blueberries
Nectarine
Bell pepper
Spinach
Kale
Cherries
Patotoes
Grapes (imported)
Celery

Hope it helps. This is his website if anyone is interested, http://www.drfuhrman.com/default.aspx

Later

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