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sulforaphane/broccoli extract

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

This supplement appears to be beneficial to all cancer patients, and does not appear to have any contraindications.
I learned about this supplement because, through genetic testing two years ago, we discovered I do not have the GSTM1 gene, which would allow my body to make glutathione, a powerful antioxidant. I had been supplementing glutathone, but recent research indicates that this genetic mutation also makes the patient unable to use glutathione.
The solution, by- pass the glutathione pathway by eating an inordinate amount of broccoli or supplement with this extract.
The importance of this information to other cancer survivors; 85% of people who develop cancer have this mutation.

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

In the naturopahic world, sulfur is used for detoxification against toxins & toxic metals. I'm kind of leery of endogenous & exogenous sources of sulfur which cancer uses to protect itself from platinum chemo. OK, chemo is toxic; but toxic for a good reason.

So all the cruciferous veggies are loaded with sulfur...and I consider these foods contraindicated for a couple of days before & a couple of days after platinum chemotherapy. Same thing goes for eggs & other sources of methionine (a sulfur-containing amino acid).

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

Seems like it would be advisabel to skip the two days before and after platinum chemo with this supplement.

mopar
Posts: 1948
Joined: May 2003

I'm going to have my husband read your posts. Although I understand what you're saying, my husband will really dig into the nuts and bolts of it all. Health, nutrition and biochemistry has always been his 'hobby'. No, he's not a doctor. But he sure does love the ins and outs of all of this 'stuff'.

May I ask what is the basis for both of you to have such knowledge/interest in these things? Are you in the medical field? Either way, I truly appreciate all your insight and posts. Keep them coming!

((HUGS))
Monika

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

I'm not in the medical field, but tend to learn as much as I can about anything going on in my life. Cancer is no exception. I work closely with an unbelievable naturopath, who is a 20 year ovarian cancer survivor. She is passionate about this subject and passes the information onto me, as her patient.

mopar
Posts: 1948
Joined: May 2003

Again, I appreciate all the valuable information on this board. Although I am currently NED, I continue what I believe to be a 'healthy approach' not just to OVCA, but to life in general. It may not be perfect, but no doubt some of my 'routine' surely has staved off a worse scenario. I do have a homeopathic doc who I see from time to time. He's about 30 miles away, so I'm searching for someone closer. As for my gyn/oncologist, I wouldn't switch for anything. But I know where he stands on the 'natural' aspect of treatment, and that's on the other side of the room! He once told me I was wasting my time and money with supplements/herbs, etc. Obviously, it's my choice, and I wouldn't change it.

We have also always believed in doing everything we can, so as we learn more and more, we try to thoroughly research and make well-informed decisions.

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

So here is my naturopath's position on this subject:

Sulfur is different than sulforophane. The sulforous compounds do in fact help the liver, but do NOT interfere with chemo----in fact---they help make the chemo work better, clear it out of the body once it is "done" and then help protect the healthy cells. Loads of studies have been shown that they do not interfere with conventional treatments. I would never skip on this important compound/foods/etc around chemo. Honestly, folks would have to eat cardboard and drink distilled water if they are going to worry about taking antioxidants and what not whilst undergoing chemo.

RoseyR
Posts: 462
Joined: Feb 2011

Thanks for the distinction between sulfur and sulforophane; Blaylock notes how crucial the difference is. And thank goodness for me, as I ate lots of brussel sprouts during my first two rounds of chemo. (My own uterine cancer shares some affinities with ovarian cancer.)

Best,
Rosey

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

I guess I am "once bitten twice shy " because I was taking a nutritional supplement loaded with sulforophanes while I did the first-line therapy that included carboplatin. AND I was taking alpha lipoic acid (another source of sulfur), too; it would reverse the neuropathy within an hour.

I have NO residual neuropathy whatsoever--and neither could I achieve a full remission. So that is my personal bias. And the goal is to prevent platinum resistance.

Tethys: let me know if your naturopath takes the time to read that research paper on the role of sulfur in platinum anticancer chemotherapy. The paper is probably too technical for lay people. Of course, sulfur is different than sulforophane. However, sulforophane is a source of exogenous sulfur--that's why it is so good at detoxing chemo & cancer has the ability to recruit sulfur to protect it.

I have a biochemistry background and I wish more research was done on integrative medicine for cancer treatment. Most of the research is done outside of the United States.

Some of the chemoprotective agents (such as d-methionine) are only available for research purposes...sigh.

Tethys41's picture
Tethys41
Posts: 1053
Joined: Sep 2010

I don't think any of us will ever know why one goes into remission and another does not. I do know another woman with the same stage and cancer type as you and I have/had. She also delayed her chemo and tried to treat it herself following surgery, and two and a half years later, has never acheived remission. Maybe it was the delay in treatment?

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

I read some Australian research that concluded that the outcome for papillary serous ovarian cancer was no different with early treatment or delayed treatment...you know, it usually is well-advanced at the time of diagnosis anyway.

I would like to know if the other women who is not in remission is on a low-sulfur program or not.

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