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from Science Daily's epigenetic news re: broccoli and cruciferous veggies. Just passing it along to those interested.

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

Eat Your Broccoli: Another Mechanism Discovered by Which Sulforaphane Prevents Cancer
ScienceDaily (Feb. 28, 2012) — Researchers in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University have discovered yet another reason why the "sulforaphane"compound in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables is so good for you -- it provides not just one, but two ways to prevent cancer through the complex mechanism of epigenetics.

Epigenetics, an increasing focus of research around the world, refers not just to our genetic code, but also to the way that diet, toxins and other forces can change which genes get activated, or "expressed." This can play a powerful role in everything from cancer to heart disease and other health issues.
Sulforaphane was identified years ago as one of the most critical compounds that provide much of the health benefits in cruciferous vegetables, and scientists also knew that a mechanism involved was histone deacetylases, or HDACs. This family of enzymes can interfere with the normal function of genes that suppress tumors.
HDAC inhibitors, such as sulforaphane, can help restore proper balance and prevent the development of cancer. This is one of the most promising areas of much cancer research. But the new OSU studies have found a second epigenetic mechanism, DNA methylation, which plays a similar role.
"It appears that DNA methylation and HDAC inhibition, both of which can be influenced by sulforaphane, work in concert with each other to maintain proper cell function," said Emily Ho, an associate professor in the Linus Pauling Institute and the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences. "They sort of work as partners and talk to each other."
This one-two punch, Ho said, is important to cell function and the control of cell division -- which, when disrupted, is a hallmark of cancer.
"Cancer is very complex and it's usually not just one thing that has gone wrong," Ho said. "It's increasingly clear that sulforaphane is a real multi-tasker. The more we find out about it, the more benefits it appears to have."
DNA methylation, Ho said, is a normal process of turning off genes, and it helps control what DNA material gets read as part of genetic communication within cells. In cancer that process gets mixed up. And of considerable interest to researchers is that these same disrupted processes appear to play a role in other neurodegenerative diseases, including cardiovascular disease, immune function, neurodegenerative disease and even aging.
The influence of sulforaphane on DNA methylation was explored by examining methylation of the gene cyclinD2.
This research, which was published in the journal Clinical Epigenetics, primarily studied the effect on prostate cancer cells. But the same processes are probably relevant to many other cancers as well, researchers said, including colon and breast cancer.
"With these processes, the key is balance," Ho said. "DNA methylation is a natural process, and when properly controlled is helpful. But when the balance gets mixed up it can cause havoc, and that's where some of these critical nutrients are involved. They help restore the balance."
Sulforaphane is particularly abundant in broccoli, but also found in other cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower and kale. Both laboratory and clinical studies have shown that higher intake of cruciferous vegetables can aid in cancer prevention.
The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the OSU Environmental Health Sciences Center.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec 2009

Just letting you know.

evertheoptimist
Posts: 140
Joined: Jan 2011

additional data point:

among the cruciferous vegetables, brussel sprouts have the most dense concentration of cancer fighting properties. Then, kale, mustard greens, and chard varieties.

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carolenk
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I just want to share some info about cancer using sulfur to resist platinum chemotherapy. The name of the research paper is The Role of Sulfur in Platinum Anticancer Chemotherapy. The full text article is available free online & you just need to use the full title in the search.

Eating cruciferous veggies is a great idea but probably not such a good idea for those who are on the platinum chemo drugs (carboplatin, cisplatin & oxaliplatin).

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

Thanks for reminding me that I do usually add, be sure to check with your doctor during treatment. Do your doctors routinely tell you not to eat any cruciferous veggies? And do they tell you all veggies that are in that group?

I should further add, try to overlook that he/she will most likely tell you that nothing you do will make any difference, only what he/she does will matter, just as Linda's doctor frequently told her. And my father's doctor told him. HOw disempowering is that to hear.

"There is nothing you can do that will help your chances of survival." I wish they would just stop saying that. Doesn't exactly cheer you up does it? No.

Wouldn't it be ever so grand if after your doctor informed you you had cancer, he brightened right away, saying and this and this and this, these are the things you can do to improve your chances of survival and a longer life. And you walked away, with a little booklet of stuff to do before,during and after the chemo and radiation. How differently we would view cancer. How differently some of us already do view it. I rather think we have a spring in our step fostered by the mere embodiment of action and empowering feelings and thoughts.

My doc told me that too. told me if I didn't get the chemo and radiation he was suggesting, I wouldn't see the far side of a year and a half. So, since I wanted to live longer than that, I looked for and found that road less traveled, and yes, Robert, that has made all the difference. I am thankful for the poetry my parents read to me when I was a child.

Sigh : ( That's for Linda, who I wish had tried things that could not have hurt and could have helped in addition to her docs recommendations. I am very, very saddened by her death.

Claudia

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jazzy1
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What we all wish for isn't always possible....oncologist telling us what to eat or how to add supplements to our daily diets. When I approached my oncologist prior to chemo (carbo/taxol) and asked about my list of supplements and if they were okay with chemo....?? His response, they aren't FDA approved and I wasn't trained in this area, but what I can tell you add in some good "natural foods" such as cruciferous vegies. Suggested only to take a multi and possibly calcium supplement and that's it. Hum...guess my doc missed the paper Carolyn posted on cruciferous vegies and drug interactions??

At least my oncologist didn't try to bulldoze me with fluff that he had no clue about. Even suggested a "specialist" that could answer my questions. Doc is truly honest and gave me guidance to seek help for supplements and proper eating away from his practice.

Our medical system is such that each of us probably has a list of 10 docs, all with different specialties. None of them interact in most cases, which is so confusing.

I as well as you Claudia, took it upon myself to go forth and gain my own information be it from research on internet, books, members on this site, etc.

We all do what we feel is best...

Hugs,
Jan

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daisy366
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"Sigh : ( That's for Linda, who I wish had tried things that could not have hurt and could have helped in addition to her docs recommendations. I am very, very saddened by her death."

Please let poor Linda rest in peace. You and I have NO IDEA of the totality of what she did or didn't do...so please don't take so much credit or cast blame where you don't know all the facts. I remember her blasting you about this and I am doing it now it her place.

I'm so very happy for you and your choices and the positive result you've had from them. I would never take that away from you. But please don't suggest that EVERY person is going to have the same result as you. It is important to note that when cancer proliferates it can do very unpredictable things. Two people with UPSC may have totally different outcomes depending on how their cancer multiplies. I think your cancer was very different than Linda's.

....God grant us the serenity to accept the things we cannot change, the courage to change the things we can, and the wisdom to know the difference....

MAE

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

Exactly, for the little prayer. Each part of that is correct on its own. Think about it.

I don't feel I know everything, I hardly "know" anything, but I am constantly searching for a different and perhaps better way, searching for news of a potential for change. Whenever I read of a university that has or that the government has done a study that shows promise, I will post it. I will suggest if it is of interest to anyone that they take it to their doctors and ask them what they think. A few of the women here have found studies and brought them to their doctor's attention, and have had their treatments changed/adjusted accordingly. My hats off to them, in their courage to change what can be changed, their wisdom to know the difference between an unchangeable constant and something that indeed needs to be changed.

I will always search for options to possibly improve the stats on UPSC. Currently they are grim, and little has changed in treatment.

Progress takes both courage and wisdom, and a willingness to embrace both with at least an open mind. One doesn't have to do anything, but it would be nice if there was at least a bit of consideration about the overall situation, before just accepting what is offered. Ask why. Many women come here looking for more than they are offered, feeling that it might not be enough. What if just a little change made all the difference.

For many their beliefs in the medical community are all they desire. If that works for them, fantastic. I'm just aware that sometimes it doesn't. And I am trying to find out why, along with hundreds of thousands of others. Thank goodness they don't all throw their hands up and say, oh well, what's the use, this is something that can't be changed! I guess I'll just leave it as it is.

Current cancer treatments are not only something that can be changed, but something that should be changed, That must be changed for lives to be saved, and the sooner the better. Let's just all say a little prayer for all those minds in labs and universities all over the world trying to do just that! TO CHANGE CURRENT CANCER TREATMENT OPTIONS.

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bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

This prayer said everything.
Thank you Mae
....God grant us the serenity to accept the things we cannot change...
The acceptance - the first thing I’ve done. I basically thank God for everything I get even the illness. God knows best what we need the most. And this terrible cancer have changed me and my life so much, I thank God every day for that.

...the courage to change the things we can...
“Thanks” to the doctor who had scheduled my treatments few months after my hysterectomy; I’ve got this TIME to build up my courage. Right after the surgery when I heard the diagnose I was so scared, ready to do chemo and radiation, everything THE DOCTOR said. In my consciousness for a moment I forgot that he is not a God and that the FEAR is the worst adviser...so thank you doctor no chemo or radiation for me... In March will be 2 years since my surgery.

...and the wisdom to know the difference....
The precious time gave me the wisdom and chance to learn the difference between the conventional and alternative treatments, between toxins and nutrients, between fight and acceptance, between good and bad.

How many of you are doing things out of fear...?

Life is beautiful no matter what it brings and no matter how long it will last. Just accept and value every moment of it!
Do not put yourself into more suffering. Take care of yourself. Take care of your body.

2 years ago I took my chance. The doctor said I have 50/50 chance of recurrence in the first year...and I have accepted that. The fear was gone. I’ve decided to enjoy my life and take care of myself...and the God surprised me.

I don’t think of myself that I’m cured. I was born with these cancerous, mutated cells. I just have to keep it dormant for as long as I can...
and I’m trying to do this by nourishing myself and starving the cancer.

Bea-Mil

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carolenk
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I wonder if it is possible to nourish yourself & starve the cancer...it seems like cancer rates are much higher in the countries that don't experience famines on a regular basis. From what I've read, many cancers over express folate receptors & have an abundance of calcium channels. All those healthy green leafy veggies that are supposed to be cancer preventive have a different effect once cancer cells have shown up.

Maybe what nourishes us, also nourishes cancer?

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

Healthy diet is not like taking a pill. You cannot cure cancer with leafy vegies, I agree, but you can strengthen your immune system, so your body will do the work for you, and that won’t happen over night.

The walls of cancer cells have a tough protein covering. Raw vegetables and fruits contain live enzymes that can dissolve the protein walls of cancer cells. When the protein coating is removed the body's killer cells are able to attack the cancer cells.
A diet of 80% fresh vegetables, fruit, whole grains, seeds, nuts helps create an alkaline state in the body. The enzymes are absorbed at the cellular level and enhance growth of healthy cells.

Some supplements, like vitamin E, help trigger apoptosis, programmed cell death. Apoptosis is the body's normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells. Various other supplements, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals help strengthen the immune system.

Cancer is a disease of the mind, body, and spirit. Anger, unforgiveness, resentment and bitterness cause an acidic body environment and cause stress in the digestive tract. People with positive outlooks have a higher percentage of cancer survival.

“The Western lifestyle is characterized by a high calorie diet, rich in fat and refined sugars and animal proteins. These dietary issues combined with a more sedentary lifestyle, have created an overall energy imbalance, which has become associated with many disease conditions such as Cancer, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

Industrial nations with the highest overall cancer rates include the United States, Italy, Australia, Germany, The Netherlands, Canada, and France. Developing countries, who hold the lowest instances of cancer related illness, are Northern Africa and Southern and Eastern Asia. “

http://www.worldhealthsciences.com/westernized-societies-have-their-own-health-issues.html

It is hard not to see the correlation between a cancer and a diet.

Bea-Mil

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carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

So, Bea-Mil, are you saying that those of us who were already eating a clean diet before getting cancer must have had some deep-seated, unresolved emotional issue that caused the cancer? If either diet or unresolved emotional issues "caused cancer" then how do you explain all the resentful folks eating the standard American diet who DON'T get cancer? We should be studying those folks! LOL!

On the other hand, there is an epigenetic theory about cancer & other chronic diseases that trace the origins back to the in-utero environment...ugh! I think the YouTube video is called The Ghost in the Genes.

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

You know, when I went to your about me page just know, and saw that you had written this-----"Cancer isn't fun, but truly opened my eyes on life. Life can change from day to day, but we need to hold onto HOPE that we will conquer this devil and live a wonderful, fulfilling life. I've got another chance at life and want to help others who are starting the cancer journey. This is just a small rough spot in my life, and I will win in the end. I'm winning today....still living!!"

Those were so similar to my sentiments. I was so determined to have this be just a blip on the radar of life. Wanting to help others. Holding both out hope and onto hope, that cancer would not conquer me. Something in those feelings gave me such great strength to continue searching for answers. What if this or that sounds reasonable. Other people have the equipment to not only conjecture but do research that will help more people either be cured of their cancers or live adjusted lives with their cancers. I remember when childhood leukemia was a death sentence. Now most children, nearly all children survive that cancer, due to the research that was done. I'm holding out hope for that for this and other cancers.

In my opinion, you are doing a stellar job in all your goals. My wish is that you continue to prosper in health for a very long time.

Love,

Claudia

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

that involved looking into how the things we eat play a role in cancer's development. Right now there is no big money interest in this, but that could change. It is also possible that the overall cancer picture would change if our food supply was less produced by big farming organizations that don't seem very interested in the quality or nutritional substance of the food, but the marketability of it. If they were guided by thoughts of, does this tomato have nutritional value for people, not will it get there in one piece and have a long shelf life, and if it doesn't taste like a tomato or nourish like an heirloom tomato, does it at least look like a tomato. That is so unfortunate. Probably the best a person can do for their health would be to grow some of their own foods from heirloom seeds. Ones that have not been changed or worse genetically altered. Would be great if the little organic farmer's value was recognized and subsidized to enrich all our lives.

The more natural a culture remains, the less cancer there appears to be in that culture? Dandelions are so nourishing. We routinely kill them to smithereens and feel very satisfied after having done so. What if we started going out to our lawns and eating those little wonders instead, roots and all, and whistfully blow on the beautiful feathery light dandelion seeds.

Here's to hope and trying new things,

Claudia

culka's picture
culka
Posts: 158
Joined: Oct 2009

so I'm going to spoil it. If you saw movie Food Matters it is time for new one "Hungry For Change"
We are on the same boat and I bet that lot of you battle some extra pound. This movie suppose to be about weight loss. For free preview register on this address
http://www.hungryforchange.tv/p/free-worldwide-online-premiere
I did.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Your comments make very good sense to me. It is very hard work to do all the right things. I need to stay focused and keep coaching myself to make the right choices every day.

Thanks for all the info and inspiration.

Mary Ann

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carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

This might be a little off topic; however, I think it is interesting:

Researchers looked at obese people and separated them into two groups--the diabetics & non-diabetics. The striking difference between the two groups was the exceedingly high amounts of "persistent organic pollutants" in the tissue samples of the obese diabetics. Persistent organic pollutants are those man-made chemicals that are very difficult to metabolize & eliminate (many are xenoestrogens).

Sometimes, environmental pollution exceeds the body's attempt to maintain health even in the face of the ideal diet. Persistent organic pollutants have been recovered in the milk of polar bears! Finally, organically grown foods are subject to exposure to toxins such as perchlorates in rain water.

Yeah, it IS hard to eat a "clean" diet.

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