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Keep those cancer clusters small. Foods that discourage angiogenesis.

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

Most people have cancer cells traveling around their bodies, but none of those cells can do major harm until they are able to establish tumors that have their own blood supply, which then allows them to grow to a size they CAN do harm. So, one of the most important things any of us can do is to try to thwart that establishment. Anti-angiogenesis foods are the key.

If you're new here, angiogenesis is the process of cancer cells sending out signals to bring new blood vessels to them. Without these new blood vessels, these little outposts cannot grow and have no power to harm, due to their limited nutrient getting capabilities and the resulting limited size capabilities.

Aim for organic foods whenever you are able to find them.

This is a list of foods, that act to discourage angiogenesis from the society by the same name:

GREEN TEA
STRAWBERRIES
BLACKBERRIES
RASPBERRIES
BULEBERRIES
ORANGES
GRAPEFrUIT
LEMONS
APPLES
PINEAPPLE
CHERRIES
RED WINE
RED GRAPES
BOK CHOY
KALE
SOY BEANS
GINSENG
Maitake mushroom
Licorice
Turmeric-one of the most powerful cancer fighters
nutmeg
Artichokes
LAVENDER
PUMPKIN
SEA CUCUMBER
TUNA
PARSLEY
GARLIC
TOMATO
OLIVE OIL
GRAPE SEED OIL
DARK CHOCOLATE

Whatever you do, there are people to answer your questions. Most are simple questions, I am rather on the outskirts looking in and all around in the search for answers.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec 2009

I can't tell you how my spirits lift whenever you post something--anything, really--on these boards. If only I had a working printer, I would paste your lists all over my fridge. Thank you, dear friend, for continuing your effort to get information out there that can help to save lives. You are helping to save mine.

I owe you an email, which I will send ASAP.

xoxo

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

I found this in your dietary thread, buried among so much other stuff, I thought each thing would do well on its own, especially for those newly finding themselves here, looking for positive helpful things to do, whilst waiting for other treatments.

Missing you my friend. Oregon is exceedingly damp, and though it is not nearly as cold as the U.P., I am finding myself unable to establish any warmth in my extremities. burrrrrrrr

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec 2009

Suffering with peripheral neuropathy, my extremities are cold most of the time--so I empathize. How long will you be in Oregon? I will write you off the boards so that we can catch up a bit. It makes me happy that you got out of the UP for a while. The image of you walking through your sister's home and seeing room after room of your paintings made me smile from ear to ear.

I hope you have some nice thick socks.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

I agree with the concept and goal of angiogenesis. Is this achievable? What do studies say about the QUANTITY we must consume these foods in order to achieve a state of angiogenesis? For example, do we need to consume a gallon of green tea? a bushel of blueberries?

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

I remember researching this topic a long time ago and being totally frustrated at the lack of specific info/quantities that should be eaten (of these foods). I do remember reading that research on the anti-angiogenic properties of foods and spices is still ongoing and that there is much still to learn about how to use anti-angiogenic foods in the optimal amounts and combinations. That info was from Livestrong.

I would love to eat 16 ounces a day of dark chocolate. LOL

Here is one article that mentions specific quantities of just 5 of those foods.
http://moneyglitch.hubpages.com/hub/Anti-Angiogenic-Foods-Eat-to-Help-Fight-Cancer

Some of the things in that list are contraindicated for other conditions....
***licorice lowers potassium levels in the blood
***turmeric is not good if one has gallstones
***soy is questionable -- eating soy products may actually be risky for cancer patients.
***grapefruit can be really bad if taken with many different medications

I just read an article yesterday that said that frozen fruits, which are harvested at their peak of ripeness and then frozen immediately, usually have more nutrients than fresh fruits which have been picked and then often travel great distances. This really makes sense.

I Will Survive
Posts: 27
Joined: Aug 2011

I think it is excessive to have 7 or 8 current threads be about foods, diet, etc. Enough already!!!!

It appears that the board has been hijacked. SIX new food-related threads have been started in the last 24 hours. I think all of these food threads are MORE confusing to a newcomer, rather than helpful. One thread would be plenty.

Hannah

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Hannah,

If you have read any of the ANTI-CANCER book and noted the importance of what we eat to fend off cancer, you'd realize these postings are well worthwhile. The World Cancer Research Fund estimates at least 40% of cancers could be prevented with diet and physical activity alone.

There are no magical cures for cancer, but that we all have tremendous control over our health and well-being through the choices we make in our lifestyle every day. And that most people who started living their lives more consciously after they developed cancer now can't understand why they didn't start living that way before, simply because it's so much more enjoyable!

If not for postings here, I'd have never known about the importance of turmeric, curciferous vegies, organic fruits, hormones in meats & dairy products, importance of exercise, etc, etc, etc., to better my health.

There are plenty of other postings which "newcomers" can gain insight from, as they journey thru Western treatments. This sight offers an array of several topics depending on where one is in their cancer journey.

I for one am the biggest advocate to learn and understand the complex inner workings of my body's natural cancer-fighting capabilities.

Might I suggest the use of your keyboard to click to another topic if one is not of interest to you.

Best always,
Jan

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Jan....I could not have said it better! So true. I have learned SOOOO much from reading these topics and so appreciate the wonderful women who do so much research and readily share their knowledge. It makes us all so much more empowered to confront this beast we have encountered.

Thanks!

Karen

RoseyR
Posts: 462
Joined: Feb 2011

Why one would object to six or even twenty postings on nutrition is beyond me.

Nutrition is one of the very few aspects of our situation we have some CONTROL of.

We have little control over which chemo our doctors recommend--or how much radiation they decide to give us. Or how our given treatment centers establish "protocols" for treating our disease. Or whether we receive the right doses of chemo and radiation. Or whether our hair falls out after treatment.

What we DO have control over is what we eat,drink, and take as supplements.

Or how seriously we take the growing science of how what we eat can help to repair the errant genes that trigger our disease.

So bring on another ten posts on these subjects, please!

Rosey

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

I love little tidbits of info. The bit about licorice lowering potassium levels is so crucial. Potassium is one of those things that knocks cancer's socks off, so low potassium levels are very bad. A few months before being diagnosed with cancer a blood panel showed my potassium to be dangerously low 2.?, when I looked it up, I only was aware of the fact that low levels could mess with a heart. Recently I found that low potassium levels allow cancer to flourish and normal discourage it. So, blah blah blah, sorry. To be aware of the consequences of eating licorice is great help.

Love ya,

Claudia

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

I do not think anyone objected to the number of POSTS on a topic, but rather to the number of THREADS on the same topic (cancer-fighting foods). And I agree, enough is enough. Do we need 8 threads on each topic? (for example, 8 threads on radiation, 8 on meditation, 8 on hair loss, 8 on leg pain, 8 on thrush, etc.) NO!

Why isn't one decent THREAD on each topic sufficient? As far as I am concerned, it could have 500 POSTS!

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec 2009

While I understand the value of having one decent THREAD on a topic, our community of women seems to go through phases of having a certain topic be of primary interest. As a result, other topics travel very far down the list and are difficult to find without doing a search. New women who are trying to get a feel for the information on this board may not even know to search for, for example, foods that may fight cancer or that information about green tea might be buried in a thread that discusses all foods. That, I assume, is the reasoning behind having separate threads for each critical topic.

Is is better to periodically add a post to certain threads so as to bump them up to the top of the list? Or does it serve an important purpose to have a bunch of unique threads? How about if we take a poll and try to do what works best for everyone?

Jill

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

do not make our life more difficult than it is already, please.
I thought this place is to share our ideas, fillings, emotions, resolve problems, find some answers etc.

My posts are always about diet, food, supplements and alternative treatments. Even if I post 10 times about same topic, it simply means that this is important to me. I’m not going to write about chemo or radiation that I don’t have any experience with. We all are different and we all have different needs.

Let’s respect each other. Why don’t write and READ things that are important to us?
Why someone is even opening a topic that has no interest in? Just to complain?
Stay positive, that will help to cure.

With love
Bea-Mil

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I'm with you on your thoughts...lets not make this a chore, just enjoy and pass along and gain lots of good information. All of this depends on where each of us is on our journey...being in treatments or post treatments. I tend to zoom in on topics about diet, food, supplements and alternative treatments as well, so won't be reading about chemo etc.

I must agree with Jill, nice to have the topic of discussion listed, so we can get to the area of our interest easier. If not, I don't mind scanning the posts, but is more time consuming.

Our lives are very stressful as it is, so whatever we do, make it easy. Just be yourself and post what you wish and people who have interest will come view. Simple~

Love to all....
Jan

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

You could go make breakfast in the time it took a five hundred post thread to load.

Often originating threads bring out other topics, which are important enough to have their own threads.

Then there are those threads that begin with an idea and get completely sidetracked my a discourse such as the one here. In those, the meat of the problem/topic tends to get lost.

That is precisely why I pulled, from the 98 post long Dietary thread, four of the factors I thought might be ones that could give women ideas to consider.

We should all be able to post as and what we wish. With nearly 2000 individual posting, surely there are things for people to consider that they find interesting. It so very, very simple and easy to scroll til you find a topic that you might desire to explore more fully.

As only one or two complain, let's just leave things as they are, as most of us are quite happy with how it has been working. I'd prefer not to have a rule on how to post. That could pose an opportunity for stress to develop. Stress is perhaps the number one driver of cancer's success. Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. I'm meditating. Love to all,

Claudia

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