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Newly Diagnosed and Needing HOPE

munurse07
Posts: 9
Joined: Feb 2012

HiI'm a 27 yr old single mom of a 2.5 yr old with a hypothalamic hamartoma. He is doing well but needs a lot of extra care and I'm having the most trouble with my diagnosis because I'm too tired to take care of him! He's the light of my life and I don't know what I'd do if my family wasn't taking responsability for him. I don't know how to explain it to everyone, but I constantly feel like I'm in a fog and could fall asleep sitting up. I was recently diagnosed with Anaplastic Astrocytoma Grade III and had an emergency partial resection and am scheduled to start radiation and temadar within a week and I just need some support on how to cope with the tiredness and ways to get through a day with an extra energetic toddler. The fog that I feel like I'm in, feels like depression. I just daze and have to push really hard to get out of the chair and do anything. Anyone with any suggestions?

4theloveofmysis's picture
4theloveofmysis
Posts: 248
Joined: Apr 2011

Im so sorry to hear of your Dx. You have come to the right place for support its like family on here. Depression, a fog, a nightmare... It doesnt seem real we all know this all to well. I still wake up thinking how can this be...
Its good that you have family to help out. The radation and temador does zap the energy of most people. You will need rest and to eat well. Let us know how you are doing.
Take care

4theloveofmysis's picture
4theloveofmysis
Posts: 248
Joined: Apr 2011

Are you a nurse? I see in your screen name and the way you write. I am also a nurse.

munurse07
Posts: 9
Joined: Feb 2012

Yes I'm a nurse. So being a medially educated patient definately has its ups and downs. LOL.

stacy0611's picture
stacy0611
Posts: 14
Joined: Feb 2012

Although I have not dealt with the surgery part, I have dealt with temodar and radiation. Personally, I didn't get zapped when I had my bulk radiation and temodar together. I have two kids, and although older and healthy, I had to learn how to allow others to help me. At first I felt like I wasn't doing enough for my kids, and then I realized that the best thing for them was to allow others to help. I don't live in the same city as my family, so it was difficult, but we made arrangments and everyone pitched in - we made it through.

Always keep hope, however be honest with yourself and your caregivers. One of the things I learned early on is I can't change my diagnosis. I can't change the time that has been given to me, however, I can make great memories and lots of pictures!

My best to you and please keep us updated!

Stacy

munurse07
Posts: 9
Joined: Feb 2012

Thank you Stacey! I feel that way already. I am thank ful for the help I have. But I feel like I'm not doing enough as a mother, despite the fact that I know I can't take care of him unless I care for myself. I just wish I could accept help without so much quilt.

4theloveofmysis's picture
4theloveofmysis
Posts: 248
Joined: Apr 2011

What kind of brain cancer do you have?

munurse07
Posts: 9
Joined: Feb 2012

I'm still waiting the final pathology report because my second opinion team feels it is further staged then originally thought. But the diagnosis they are usings is anaplastic astrocytoma III.

steve13years
Posts: 1
Joined: Feb 2012

I was diagnosed with an Anaplastic Astrocytoma in February, 1998, at the age of 42. I was treated at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa. I underwent a resection in May, 1998, followed by 8 weeks of focused radiation and 18 months of chemotherapy. I have been in remission since Noverber, 1999. I credit my survival to the following factors:
1. Quality Treatment. I received state of the art treatments from a top cancer center. General hospitals do not offer the same cutting edge treatments.
2. Attitude: I made a conscious decision that I simply would not allow this disease to kill me.
3. Age: At 42, I was young enough to tolerate the treatments very well. You are even better off in this regard than was I.
4. Humor: I realized that I would rather laugh than cry about my illness. I joked about the illness itself, and I watched nothing but comedy movies and TV programs. I LAUGHED A LOT!
5. Prayer: While I am not a very religious person, I have many friends who are. I was placed on many church prayer lists with hundreds of people I never met praying for me. I don't doubt that this helped.
6. Natural Supplements: Although my doctors placed little faith in this, I believed that diet and supplements would help. I concentrated on supplements known for their antioxidant qualities. I continue this today. And I took colon-cleansing supplements to clean out my digestive system, thereby improving my body's immune system. I continue this today.

munurse07
Posts: 9
Joined: Feb 2012

Thank you for your comments. I truley believe that all these aspects help! I had my first round of high dose chemo and did NOT tolerate it at all and ended up admitted to the hospital with severe dehydration. And am totally scared to death for round two. It's hard for me because I have a young child and I am so tired all the time. Its been hard for me to keep my faith and strenth up. And what kind of colon cleansing did you use because I go from constipation to severe diarhhea frequently.

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