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Gallbladder Cancer - 2012 (Any Stage)

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi everybody!

I'm starting a new discussion thread after having some frustrations posting today.
When the threads get too large we seem to have problems. Double posting, no posting, disconnect, etc. I don't know if you have experienced this or not, but it just drives me crazy.

Of course I will still check the other threads but if we all could move forward to this thread, it might be easier for us.

For those of you who don't know me I'm Lily and I am a six year survivor of Gallbladder Cancer Stage 4. I was given a very short time frame at time of diagnosis but everyone was wrong! You can read my story under my profile.
I have had the last laugh, continue to laugh and I'm doing well.

Post your story and let others know you have survived the battle, are in the midst of the battle, or are continuing on with your battle which may have changed from original diagnosis.

This is a terrible disease but you can beat it. Talk to us and we will try to help you.

Take Care
Lily

Dixiedoddin
Posts: 1
Joined: Jul 2012

Have just been diagnosed with gallbladder cancer after a CT scan as a follow up to Non Hodgkins Lymphoma remission (2nd occurance after 14 years). Have had gallbladder removed but it has gone through the wall and after hearing my options with local surgeons & treatment, I have opted to contact/seek an appointment with M.D. Anderson's in Houston. Am awaiting word of whether they will accept me. Is there ANY cancer center that has a great history of treatment? Am at a loss right now of where to go. As far as I know, right now, it hasn't spread but still am aware of the survival stats.

Any heads up would be so appreciated!

Dixie

hillaryjoRN
Posts: 32
Joined: Apr 2012

First of all, you are not alone, we know what you are going through! Don't worry about the statistics, you are not a number.
secondly my family and I also wanted to seek the best place with the most experience treating gallbladder cancer, but that place doesn't really exist since gallbladder cancer is so rare. we decided as a family to have treatment locally for my mother, our local oncologist consulted with a Dr. from Sloan ketting in NYC (because we were told that was the best place) we found that treatment is pretty much the same where ever you go, for my mothers stage of cancer Stage 2 or T2N0M0, which sounds like what you have. But Go and seak another opinion, so you don't have regrets! I am interested to hear what MD Anderson has to say. Happy you found this site, it has been a blessing for me and my family.
--God bless you on your journey to finding the right treatment and care! --Hillary

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

HI all: I have gallbladder cancer (diagnosed 3 years ago) and have been
having chemo treatments called folfirinox (used for colon cancer and pancreatic
cancer) which seems to have worked for the spread to the peritoneum and
liver. But the side effects are nasty! I ended up in the hospital May 28
and got out a few days ago - that is 3 months! I had a perforated bowel
followed by septicemia and ended up on life support for 2 weeks from
which I woke up paralyzed from the nose down. I can now walk with a walker
and move most of my other "bits". Not sure I want to try chemo again!
Cheryl

Jean160
Posts: 26
Joined: Sep 2011

Yicks, Cheryl. I have been worried about you. Have not heard from you in awhile. I wondered if you had been in the hospital, and of course, I would not know! I am so sorry you had that complication. I am glad you are up and moving! It takes a while to get your strength back. Keep pushing! Ouch... 3 months is a long time. I am sending you healing thoughts and prayers. Keep strong and determined! Jean

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Thanks, Jean, I appreciate your thoughts. I am getting good physio here so
am doing better than expected. Didn't realize how hard it was to learn the things
I took for granted before like walking!
Cheryl

a_prabhat
Posts: 5
Joined: Apr 2012

Hi Cheryl,
Sorry to hear about your complications. I am sure you will fight back from this like you did every time. You have been a great inspiration on this forum and by far the most active member helping out others with information.

I have a good news about my dad. He had scans after 6 cycles of his chemo which showed significant shrinkage and about 20% of it is still left. Doctors asked him to go for 3-4 cycles more, if he can handle. His only side effects now fatigue and nausea. Mostly fatigue. He is eating a lot, which I think is a good sign. He is scheduled for a Cataract(eye operation) procedure next week, which takes about a month to recover. After that he will go through some tests and be put on chemo again. Hope tumors dont become active right away.

Good luck with your recovery, will pray for you. I will keep all updated on how things go.

Thanks
Anil

JennyJenny
Posts: 2
Joined: Aug 2012

Hi everyone! I'm so happy to have found this discussion board as you all have such positive stories to share which give me hope and faith that my mom will recover.

My name is Jenny and my mom was diagnosed with Gallbladder Cancer July of 2011. She is 58 years old and we live in Massachusetts. She had gone to the ER to have her gallbladder removed in June 2011 and they found a tumor growing inside it that was cancerous. They decided right away to have the surgery to remove part of the liver and the surrounding lymph nodes. At that point they didn't find any signs that it had spread beyond the gallbladder but they decided to treat her with a round of gemcitabin and radiation, did a CT scan after the treatment was done around January 2012 and found nothing, we were so happy. Then in June 2012 another CT scan was done and that's when the devastating news came, a small tumor was found in the liver and that it had spread to the abdominal lining.

We haven't had any history of cancer in my family so this has just been so hard for me and my family, especially my dad who is so stressed and worried. She's so young and healthy too. Yesterday she started chemo again, a mix of Leucovorin, Oxaliplatin, and 5-FU. Is anyone here familiar with that cocktail? Has it proven to work? I trust my mom's doctors and know that she's in the best care possible. She has 1 week on and 1 week off for 4 cycles, then they're doing another CT scan to see if the tumors have shrunk. I'm just so worried and was hoping there may be someone out there who has gone through a similar situation. I know it's going to be a long road and I'm trying to remain positive and supportive, but it's just so shocking. They haven't really given us a prognosis either, which I guess is a good thing.

I hope and pray every day that the tumors will shrink and she'll be able to maintain a good quality of life!

Jenny

Meg2003
Posts: 13
Joined: Jan 2012

Hi Everyone,

I just wanted to give you all an update and let you know my dad is still fighting. He was diagnosed in January of 2012 with stage 4 gallbladder cancer. It's been a bit of a roller coaster ride.

He was originally approved for resecting and then they decided in was inoperable. Due to increased fluid build up in his gallbladder they decided to FINALLY remove that in June. When they went in there, they found that the tube they had inserted to reduce fluid in gallbladder, had punctured his bowel so they had to remove 3 inches. In otherwords a somewhat minor surgery turned into a huge one with an 11 inch incision and a lengthy recovery.

He finally gained the weight back and his port was put in and now 2 weeks later he has a painful bulge in his right upper abdomen. He thinks it's a hernia, and I can't help but hope that's what it is. Who new you would ever wish for hernia? Has anyone else experienced this? He leaves for the cancer center again Tuesday so he's too afraid to go to any doctors here which could cause a delay on chemo if they admit him.

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Jenny and Meg: First, Jenny. My path has been similar to your mom's - gallbladder tumour extending from the gallbladder to the liver in October 2009, had it all removed April 2010 (but not the other bits that should have been taken out like lymph nodes), started chemo September 2010 after a 4 month incision healing process - the chemo was a cocktail of gemcitibine and cisplatin but it didn't work to shrink the small tumours that started on my peritoneum and liver. In March 2011 started a much more aggressive chemo called folfirinox which is oxaliplatin + irenotecan + 5FU pump + leuc.....whatever it is. Had 14 treatments that stopped May 2012. This is a much nastier regime than the cisgem one - neuropathy, cold intolerance, constant diarrhea, fatigue. As you'll see above, I ended up in the hospital for 3 months with a perforated bowel. But it did work to shrink some of the peritoneum cancerous nodules and slowed down the growth on the liver. Another woman on the peritoneum discussion thread has reported that a similar regime as your mom is having appears to be working on her 27 year old daughter and she will be on chemo for life. The inclusion of irenotecan in the "normal" folfox regime I think is important but it is a nasty treatment and I don't want to go back on it! But may have to.

Now Meg. I too developed a hernia after my first surgery that removed the gallbladder, its tumour, and part of the liver. Mine was an incisional hernia that I had for 2 years and was repaired during my surgeries in May 2012. He should be wearing a binder to keep the hernias supported. Mine didn't hurt but I looked 9 months pregnant!

Cheryl

a_prabhat
Posts: 5
Joined: Apr 2012

Hello All, Has anyone heard about administering Vitamin C using IV. I was watching a documentary called 'Food Matters' and they claim that Vitamin C from 30g-100g helps reduce cancer.
Can anyone suggest the best diet while off from chemo regime?

Meg2003
Posts: 13
Joined: Jan 2012

They determined he does not have a hernia, it has something to do with damaged nerves so the muscle isn't working. He went in for the MRI on saturday to confirm it wasn't a hernia and they found 2 spots(8mm and 9mm)on his pancreas. Has anyone else experienced this? To our knowledge, his lymph nodes are still clear but my mom is going to ask that they check them out again.

This just kind of caught us off guard. His blood work and cancer margins are those of a pefectly healthy person, not someone with cancer, nor have they ever been abnormal. He has been managing his chemo very well, his doctors are amazed and seem to be hopeful, but that was before this bump in the road.

tracier
Posts: 2
Joined: Sep 2012

Hi lily and everyone. My cousins husband was just diagnosed with metistatic gallbladder cancer that started in the gallbladder wall, and has spread to a large part of his liver. They have been given little hope and have been told it is very rare. My question to you guys is where in the US do you think he would get the best cutting edge treatment with the best surgeons. I think they have been told that surgery was not an option due to the size of the metastisis. Should they get a second opinion from another surgeon and is there a clinic anywhere that specializes in this type of cancer. We are in North Idaho rural area. He is only 49. He will be starting chemo soon. Any help or hope would be greatly appreciated.

Meg2003
Posts: 13
Joined: Jan 2012

Hello,

My dad (63) was diagnosed with stage IV gallbladder cancer in January 2012. His had spread to his liver, abdominal wall, and rib cage. We checked out a few facilities but felt the best about Cancer Treatment Centers of America. They are awesome and truly care about their patients. My dad was told originally that his was inoperable but they did end up doing surgery due to quality of life issues and removed his gallbladder. He was told he would never go into remission (without a miracle of course) but they believe he can live with it being 'controlled' for a VERY long time.

This facility focused on being positive. They do cover airfare for the patients and once they need caretakers, they will cover their airfare as well as long as you have private health coverage. My mom says it doesn't feel like a hospital at all and the doctors and nurses are very friendly and supportive as well as the other patients. My mom refers to it as a private 'club' but of course it isn't one anyone hopes to join.

This cancer is a tricky one, but it isn't impossible to beat and he could very well live with it for years to come as long as you start treatment right away.

Chemo for some is tolerable, which has been the case for my dad. They give medications through IV along with chemo to help with nausea. I highly suggest never turning those down. He is usually tired for a few days after infusion and then is back to his normal self. He hasn't lost any weight and does not look like a cancer patient at all. He's currently on a 6 month round of chemo (infusions every 2 weeks)which will be done in November and then they'll take him off for about 3 months.

They have done several scans and they were all clear, but the recent surgery showed it's all still there. This form of cancer really is a pain in the butt, but despite what doctors may have told him, there is still hope. From what I've heard, so many fighting this cancer can still go about their day to day lives while going through treatment. Do not allow your cousin to settle on doctor or facility who doesn't give them hope.

Good luck, we'll all be praying for him!

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

HI: That's the scary thing about CT and MRI scans. Sometimes they miss important details - like tumours! I had the same thing happen to me. Three MRIs in a row showed no tumours on the peritoneum (so we stopped chemo for 6 months) but a 4th scan (CT) showed them still there. So relying on scans may be dangerous but not sure what else one can do for monitoring. My oncologist doesn't believe in tumour blood marker like CA119 or 125 or whatever the other one is.
Keep us posted!
Cheryl

Libbyh
Posts: 6
Joined: Sep 2012

Hi there Cheryl and everybody,
I'm new on this web site and am so happy to have found it - you guys are such an inspiration. Talking about tumour markers, my oncologist said to me not to fully rely on them but they are still an indication that the treatment we are being given is working. My tumour markers went from 2290 in June this year when i was first diagnosed to 586 in September. To my Oncologist and me this is amazing and is what still gives me hope when a few months back I had none. To change the subject, I am on my 3rd cycle of chemo treatment - Cisplatin and Gemcitabine. Since I started back in August I have put on 6kgs in weight and eat like a horse. I also have been getting itchy fingers and palms and the soles of my feet, has anyone else had the same problems?
Looking forward to a reply - be well everyone, Libby
Ps, I did put my first discussion in a few weeks back ((I replied to Rocky) because I didn't know how to start my own discussion

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi: I didn't get any itchiness or tingling while on cisplatin and gemcitibine but have had it with oxaliplatin (another but stronger platinum chemical). Tell your oncologist about it and he/she may be able to reduce the amounts of cisplatin you are getting. Which tumour marker did you get?
Cheryl

Libbyh
Posts: 6
Joined: Sep 2012

Hi there Cheryl
Thank you for your reply, it is nice to actually talk to some one else suffering with the same complaint. I don't know of any one in New Zealand who I can talk too. My tumour marker was the CA19-9, the other one they did was the CEA and that went from 13.8 in August to 7.7 in September.
My story is just like all of ours. I was diagnosed in June this year with a tumour in my gallbladder the size of and orange which had spread to my liver and bile ducts. Of course I had all the usual doom and gloom from the doctors who say it is inoperable and who have given me the usual months to live. They don't know how strong some of us can be and you people here on this website are testimony to this, so thank you Cheryl, Lily and all you other wonderful survivors out there who give hope and help others like me with your positiveness and encouragement. I am only 55 years old and have too much to live for so I will be fighting hard....
Much love
Libby

TJ2017
Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 2012

Lily,

Thank you for telling your story! My dad had scans last week due to weight loss and a blood test that showed some liver issues. The scans came back with 5cm tumor in gallbladder, looks like spreading to liver, some tumars in lymph nodes, some tumors in lower lung, and small (which could be unrelated) mass in kidneys. He has never been sick, just complained of slight nausea and a little tired. We had a biopsy yesterday and all indications point to gallbladder cancer that has mestastasized. Our doctor has said he would surprised if it is anything else. So we are beginning the journey that so many of you have bravely been fighting. You all give me hope. My dad lives in south florida. I live in LA. We have a consult with my dad's doctor recommended oncologist next week and one I found at a cancer institute nearby that could be good. We are going to give both a chance, but the need for support and the success of Lily's procedures. LA may be a better place to start.

Lily: Do you know of how I can find an oncologist in LA? Should I call Weber's office and ask for an oncologist referral? Would your Dr in nevada have a referral in LA? Not sure how to start? I looks like UCLA has the experience and part of me leans toward doing all this in LA if my dad agrees to it. Looking for some counsel. I actually called your nevado dr's office and since I am not a patient they couldn't offer any referral.

Thank you for any help.

Trevor

Jean160
Posts: 26
Joined: Sep 2011

Hello to everyone. Cheryl, I hope you are up and feeling better. To Susan, I imagine you are still going through chemo, and I hope things are going well: I know chemo can kick you back a bit (haven’t heard from you in a while).

To TJ2017 and tracier: looking for good care centers . I really believe there are a lot of good facilities for gallbladder cancer. Not sure if there is one perfect place; but I would look for a doctor with some experience in the area: this is rare enough that most docs do not have personal experience with gallbladder cancer; but if at least one or two providers on you team have experience, it really helps. I know Slone Kettering and MD Anderson, among others do a lot of biliary surgery training: but the people they train of course are all over and have settled everywhere. I know when we were trying to decide where to go for surgery (I saw 3 different surgeons before I decided on one that I felt the best about); my husband and I looked at their bios to see where they trained and what kind of experience they had. I would also choose to go to a facility where they do more of these surgeries (usually a bigger medical center). Of course I was also looking for one with positive attitude as well. ☺. We thought of going out of state; but for us, to follow up closer to home sounded good (all things being equal). I stayed within my state (WA), but my surgeon trained at Slone Kettering. Although 2011 was not a fun year for me, I feel I received good treatment. So far, so good. I was only 56 when diagnosed: the shock of my life.

What I am curious about is: what was the circumstance surrounding the gallbladder cancers? I had a polyp in my gallbladder. Were most others a polyp? Gallstones? Porcelain gallbladder? Infection? Take care, everyone. Keep fighting........
Jean

westie66's picture
westie66
Posts: 642
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi Jean: A good question. I was told mine was likely a result of irritation from the many gallstobes I had in my gallbladder over a long period of time. It was recommended I get my gallbladder removed years and years ago because it was full of gallstones but, nope, I was too busy to take time off. Apparently it is most common in women in the highlands of the Andes - go figure! I know that gallstones are more common in women than men, women in their 50s or older, and in locations where hard water is common.
Cheryl

Nacree
Posts: 1
Joined: May 2012

Hi everyone. I'm new at posting to the discussion board but not new to the site. I've been reading everyone's comments here and there since Mother's Day which was the day my mom was diagnosed with gbc. Everytime I felt like I was losing hope, I immediately come to this site. I look for stories that would inspire me and give me hope. I look for posts where individuals are facing the same difficulties as my mom.
Right now, I feel so hopeless and have finally decided to post a comment. My mom was admitted to hospital this past Friday bc she was having symptoms of jaundice. After the ct scans, the drs found blockage in the bile duct. They are pretty sure it's a tumor. The cancer has spread to her liver. She had her gall bladder removed in may. The gi specialist didn't seem optimistic at all. If anything, he destroyed any hope I had. He will be performs ekcp today to insert stent in bile duct. I asked if he's 100% sure it's cancer bc there was no biopsy done but he said he's positive it is. I want to have hope to help my mom keep fighting his fight. But how can I when the drs and specialist tells me lot to. My mom also has tumor in her lymph node located in her neck. She had radiation but I haven't noticed much shrinkage. Please anyone.... Anyone who has had similar symptoms as my mom, give me any advice, any words of encouragement to help me stay positive. When I look at my mom, I feel guilty for feeling hopeless. She needs me to be strong and I am truly trying.

hillaryjoRN
Posts: 32
Joined: Apr 2012

Hello everyone!
My mom only has two more chemo treatments left and then we are done! and God willing done forever! We have a follow up scan post treatment in december.. then the oncologist recommends a CT every 6 months and blood work (liver enzymes) every 3 months. Hope everyone is doing well! God bless Hillary

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi Hillary,

You and your mom are in the count down now. Congrats! Let us know the results of the scan in December. Watch out for the dreaded scan anxiety. Follow-up of CT scans and blood work are the norm. I still have blood work every three months after 7 years of surviving.

Every day is a blessing.

Take Care
Lily

Shamsrecovering
Posts: 5
Joined: Nov 2012

Dear Lily and all:
Before I reached this website I was a lost wife of a loving husband who was just diagnosed with a Stage4 Cholangiocarcinoma that took over the Liver and lungs from the biliary ducts (I.e. inoperable). A cousin sent me the link here: my Gosh, there's so much more hope than doctors ever like to portray. They gave us a few months with Chemo, and said we need a re-diagnosis before starting that since the PETs, CTs, MRIs and all that other stuff we did may not be fully sufficient to get the proper treatment right.
We're heading to France tomorrow, originally we're from Egypt, and will hopefully start treatment as soon as they confirm the diagnosis 100%
The first UK doctor who saw the files said we should just stick home and not let him suffer through Chemo since we're only talking about a few months. My husband himself is talking about it like its a cold and will go away. In between the bad news I receive and his optimistic outlook on his sickness I'm a desperate wife who's looking all over the world for one glimpse of light.
I'm so glad I found you and all the others on this discussion and I wish you all the good recovery you're hoping for and deserve with the hope you're spreading here.
Thank you

Shamsrecovering
Posts: 5
Joined: Nov 2012

Finally after searching the world for answers, we receive exactly what you have all heard: chemo with Gemzar and Eloxatine - 6 months initially but likely to extend to one year.
My beloved husband is having a difficult time coping. The difficulty is that we were just about thinking of having children, and with the conditions currently at hand, we're not even able to collect his semen for the future. This is adding to the stress of the whole situation.
He was very strong thus far, but seems that the delay in start of treatment (maybe another few days) is making him nervous and difficult. He keeps losing important papers and refuses to let me handle that.

I wonder now how things will develop once we start treatment! Will it get better or worse?

Hope5
Posts: 2
Joined: Nov 2012

We are in the process of choosing a chemo treatment for my mother who was recently diagnos ed with stage 4a gallbladder cancer and 2 different teaching hospitals have suggested different combinations of chemo and a clinical. She is so confused to how to choose what is right. I cannot do it either for her, how do you know what to go with?

I hope as I do for all that things get better and better as the time goes on.

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

Hello

I'm so sorry that this disease has come into your mother and your lives. Choices are very difficult to make when you are in the midst of the storm. Since you have stated that you are dealing with two different teaching hospitals that is why there are two differnt options being suggested based on their protocols.

I think to come to a decision you need to first evaluate the doctors that will be going hand and hand with your mom on this journey. Which hospital has had more experience GBC patients? What were the successes with these patients? Is your mom more comfortable with one or the other? Are the hospitals in close proximty to where she lives? Is there any differences in the insurance (in-network or out-of-network) costs? It is terrible to have to deal with the financial side of things but it has to be a consideration as we all know that cancer treatment is expensive. Clinical trials are a good thing when the options may be limited.

It is hard to know which one will be right for her but making the best decision based on what information you have is usually the best choice.

It is a difficult journey with many ups and downs but it can be made to be at the least manageable.

Take Care
Lily

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi again,

I'm putting the title in the subject line because this board seems to be posting at the end today. That's what usually happens this time of year when the discussion thread is too large.

I'm sorry your husband is under such stress. I found that if I broke down my disease into more manageable pieces then it was easier to cope. I created milestones to achieve during the process. He is probably upset that you both had made the decision to have children and then that decision was taken away from him. So much of his life is in such turmoil that it can be really hard to handle. Maybe you could discuss milestones that you could strive for, such as after successful treatment then re-visiting the possibility of having children.

The delay is bothering him because he wants to get started with this and every day to him is precious. He doesn't want to give up his control and it is very frustrating to him that everything that he has taken care of now he won't be able to. You should talk to him and tell him that you are a team and you need to help each other get through this. You might not do things exactly the way that he would but it will get done. He needs to concentrate on just getting better. There will come a time for him that he will surrender and let you do things but he isn't quite there yet.
There will be good days and bad days, but as a team you will get through it.

Take Care
Lily

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi,

I'm so glad that you found us! Your husband is even younger than I was at time of diagnosis (I was 46 Stage 4 - inoperable). His age can work to his advantage. Hopefully he doesn't have any other medical issues and he was relatively healthy before this diagnosis. With treatment the winds of change can blow your way and maybe he will become operable like I did. I think most doctors don't even know that there are some survivors out there in this big old world. But everyone who visits this site and reads or posts knows that we do exist and we are here to spread Hope & Faith. This re-assessment is an ongoing thing that has to be done to see if the chemo cocktail of choice is doing what it needs to do. I was on the every three months re-assessment schedule for a very long time. Five years of every 3 months assessments, 1 year of every 6 month assessments and finally in year 7 once a year assessment as far as scans are concerned. I still see my oncologist every three months but that is because he has a vested interest in my success and if anything should come up he wants to be on top of it. Better to be overly cautious I say.

I too was told to get my affairs in order as the survival rate for this disease isn't good. Well they were all wrong and those survival rates need updating. I had to laugh a little when you said your husband is talking about it like it’s a cold, I did the same thing. Denial was my friend and ignoring the issues worked for me as well. No one wants to face something like this especially if they have always been in control and made everything happen the way that they wanted to so far in this life. Sounds like he is also stubborn and he isn't going to give in easily and fight it all the way. Good for him!

Sometimes I think it is harder to be the caregiver than the patient as the caregiver has to watch someone that they love go through this. But you will be his advocate throughout this journey to help him when the going gets rough, and it sometimes can get real rough.

Talk to us whenever you need help, or even to vent your frustration, we are all here for you.
Let us know how it is going.

Take Care
Lily

ScotterR
Posts: 1
Joined: Nov 2012

My Dad unfortunately was diagnosed in June with gallbladder cancer. Surgery is not an option as the cancer has metastisiced (spelling?). By the way, we are in Canada and that may make a difference in treatment procedures. Oncologists do not seem to provide much detail but perhaps my parents are not being probing enough. Met with Dr Hart at St Joseph's in Toronto back in July. After second MRI, DR Hart determined surgery would not be "beneficial". This prognosis took a few months. By the time my Dad was subscribed to the regular chemo regime it was late September. My Dad had a platic stent put in his bile duct to drain his liver in July. Within a month or so he had to have it replaced. Now it is time to replace the stent again. The DRs are debating whether it should be another platic stent or a metal stent. The plastic stent can be replaced numerous times. The metal stent once in place cannot be replaced. The platic is thinner in diameter. The metal is thicker in diameter and can be cleaned out but is shorter which means the cancer can grow around and block the stent. Has anyone had experience with this situation and decision. What are the pros and cons of a platic versus metal stent

Monarch64
Posts: 22
Joined: Apr 2012

Hey Rocky,

Haven't heard from you for a bit but certainly think about you and pray for you and your family daily.  How are you?  Hope that is all is going well.

Mom asks about you all the time.  She is doing excellent!  We have been so very, very blessed.

Best wishes for all!

Charmi

hillaryjoRN
Posts: 32
Joined: Apr 2012

Just wanted to let everyone know that my mom's CT scan in December was NORMAL:) :)!!!  March will mark her one year anniv. since the diagnosis. She is doing great...and we expect to continue to recieve good news!         hugs to everyone!     Hillary

Lily50's picture
Lily50
Posts: 209
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi!

That is great news!!!  Happy Dance for you both!  I started a new thread since this one has gotten so big.  Gallbladder Cancer - 2013 (Any Stage), if you don't mind maybe you could post a brief statement regarding your mother's diagnosis and just how well she is doing for the new people coming to the new board.  It is always good to hear success stories.

Happy New Year to you both!

Take Care

Lily

JennyJenny
Posts: 2
Joined: Aug 2012

It's been a while since I posted here but I wanted to say thank you to Westie66 for your response, that made me feel better knowing there's someone out there similar to my mom. All of these posts are incredibly helpful and inspiring. I love hearing the updates of positive CT scan results too which made me want to share my mom's results. 

In October my mom's CT scan showed that the tumors in the liver, abdomen, and ovaries all shrunk over 50%!! This was after her treatment of Leucovorin, Oxaliplatin, and 5-FU, every other week for 6 weeks. So needless to say it was a successful treatment.

And in turn, her dr gave her a break from treatment over the holidays. However, I think this may have been too long for her because now she has ascites (fluid build up in her abdomen and lungs) and it's really making it hard for her to breathe and is just really uncomfortable. Has anyone else had that symptom before? She looks worse than she did on chemo, and I just don't get it. I'm so excited that her cancer shrunk, but I'm still so very worried that somehting else is wrong. I want her to be well enough to at least take walks and lead a normal life again. I feel like she spends every day in the hospital now. Last time the chemo helped this but I would hate to know she has to be on chemo the rest of her life in order to not have this anymore. Trying to stay strong for her though. 

Anyways, any support would be awesome. Hope everyone is doing well and are having a happy new year! :) 

Jenny

Kristina916
Posts: 3
Joined: Apr 2012

Hey JennyJenny, Your story reminds me of my own. My mom is 55 and has been on the same chemo regime for 11 rounds. She had lots of problems with her blood counts, so it took her much longer to get through the 11. She did 9/11 with the oxyplatin until her neuropathy started to really bother her. Her CT scans showed continual shrinkage in her main tumors, which was wonderful news. Recently, some mets to the spine showed up and she has been in a lot of back pain, but the oncologist thinks the pain is coming from her liver. We are going to start some radiation and then switch over to gem/cis to kill some more cancer cells. I just wanted to reach out as someone in your position and let you know that I hope things continue to go welll for your mom and that you stay strong and take care of yourself as well! Much good luck to your family!

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