CSN Login
Members Online: 8

The Cancer Project

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Check out www.cancerproject.org

After reading an article in our local newspaper I signed up for "Food for Life" cooking classes sponsored by the Cancer Project. I had heard of this program several months ago on TV but this group had no local programs then, but happily now they do. There is the website with recipes and more. Below is some basic info. Check with your local ACS or cancer facility to see if they are active in your community.

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.

The Cancer Project has two main goals: First, we aim to make cancer prevention a top priority. Just as important, we want to improve survival after cancer has been diagnosed by providing comprehensive information about the role of dietary factors in keeping people healthy.

The Cancer Project advances cancer prevention and survival through nutrition education and research. With over one million people being diagnosed with cancer in the United States each year—and many more cases in other countries across the globe—there is an urgent need for a new direction in battling this disease. The Cancer Project provides classes, books, video programs, fact sheets, brochures, and other educational materials on cancer prevention and survival. We also conduct clinical research studies to investigate dietary issues and publicize the need for cancer prevention and the value of healthy diet changes. The Cancer Project’s hands-on nutrition classes have become incredibly popular, helping cancer survivors and their families learn new tastes and easy food preparation skills. Staff members are regularly interviewed by the media and often give public lectures.

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

I appreciate the information. I attended one of these Cancer Project classes. I think it is geared more for those who have the desire to prevent cancer as the info is sort of "one size fits all."

As someone with persistent metastatic ovarian cancer, I have decided to avoid some of the foods that are supposed to be good for preventing cancer. That would be the foods that are rich in folate/folic acid.

I found some info that the folate receptor was being targeted for anti-cancer therapy as it is over-expressed in many cancers. That means folate/folic acid probably feeds my cancer! Maybe yours, too.

Don't take my word for it, here's a web site with more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folate_targeting

For American cancer survivors: be aware that folate/folic acid is now put into ALL commercially-prepared wheat flour products--by law. This decision was made to prevent birth defects.

The Cancer Project nutrition class I attended was helpful overall and I wish there was an actual cooking demonstration done, too, as a lot of young people nowadays don't know really how to cook.

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

I had not heard of this group....sounds interesting! I quickly read a few of the recipes and they sounded tasty AND healthy. Will definitely spend more time on that site!

Thans for sharing it, Mary Ann! Let us what you think of the class!

Karen

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

I checked out wikipedia and learned that many of the foods that I like are high in folic acid. There is so much to think about. What do you typically eat? I have metastatic UPSC - which is supposed to act like ovarian.

How do you know how much is too much? A balanced diet is supposed to be good. I think I eat a balanced diet but I have not paid attention to the folic acid content. I also take a multivitamin and fish oil.

Your feedback is appreciated. Mary Ann

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

....from October 11, about folic acid

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/04/health/nutrition/04foli.html

and more info:http://health.nytimes.com/health/guides/nutrition/folic-acid-folate/overview.html

is this the same list you saw, MaryAnn?

http://www.wheatfoods.org/AboutWheat-list-of-foods-with-folic-acid/Index.htm

and what the American Cancer Society has to say, which, in my opinion, is not definitive

http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/folic-acid

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

none near me!

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

Mary Ann

There really isn't much evidence that taking a multivitamin is beneficial to anyone. I don't take a multivitamin but do take vitamin D.

I eat foods that are high in folate only occasionally--that is to say no more than a couple of times/week. Certainly not on a daily basis. I've got the papillary serous form of ovarian cancer. I was eating a really healthy diet at the time that I got cancer and I wonder if I didn't have the best-fed cancer in town! It was so vigorous--it even grew back after surgery.

I know it is hard to know what to eat. Generally, I follow a modified Anti-cancer diet which is basically an anti-inflammatory diet and I avoid most grains (except oatmeal and occasional brown rice).

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

Dr. Weil suggests a multi-vitamin daily and grains are the second most-important food group on his pyramid after fruits and vegetables.

Whole and cracked grains (3-5 a day), pasta al dente (2-3 times per week), beans and legumes (1-2 a day)

Of course his pyramid includes no meats, which I eat in moderation!

It's all about living life!

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

There's no evidence to support Dr. Weil's recommendation for a daily multivitamin.

The whole grain idea is fine for the general public. Grains break down into sugar-- a piece of whole grain toast is approx. equal to 2 tablespoons of sugar. I ain't eatin' that.

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

Carolenk wrote "There's no evidence to support Dr. Weil's recommendation for a daily multivitamin."

I do think that babies, children, and teenagers need them. And a multivitamin is probably no worse for us than all the supplements that are indiscriminately taken without guidance by many people.

I know that as one gets older, vitamin absorption from foods can be a problem, so multivitamins are good for this population. As you age, the body’s ability to digest and absorb nutrients decreases, which can lead to nutritional deficiencies and increase the risk of infection.

And they are also probably good for the millions of people who do not eat a well-rounded diet.

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

Not all carbohydrates are bad and break down into so much sugar that we should not eat them.

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/carbohydrates-full-story/

You cannot get the nutrients that good carbs provide out of a supplement bottle.

I think the answer is low carbs, not no carbs.

RoseyR
Posts: 464
Joined: Feb 2011

Am aware that some doctors such as Mark Fuhrman, of New Jersey, warn cancer patients NOT to take a multivitamin that has folic acid in it.

But is folic acid the same substance as folate? I don't think so.

And isn't folate in its natural forms (green leafy vegetables) always nutritious, esp for cancer patients? My doctor prescribed ProGreens, which I take every morning (one scoop in glass of water). It's high in chlorella, spirulina, probiotics, and folate--not folic acid.

Carolenk, what caused you to reduce your foods high in folate--what was the source of your warning to decrease it in your diet? Maybe we should all know about it. I know we should avoid commercial grain products supplemented with folic acid but it wouldn't occur to me to reduce leafy green vegetables.

Whether multivitamins are a colossal waste of time or a boon is up for debate. Obviously a lot depends on the formula and its absorbability. Some recommend only those that you take six of a day (2 x 3) for otherwise, few can offer any substantice nutrition. And many recommend for cancer patients one without any iron or copper--such as NUtrient 950.

Would like to hear from others on the folic acid/folate debate.

thanks,
Rosey

carolenk's picture
carolenk
Posts: 909
Joined: Feb 2011

My own logic warned me to avoid folate/folic acid. I learned about a targeted chemo that was using the folate receptor to attack malignant cells. Maybe folic acid is the man-made version of folate--both seem to fit into the same receptor. Many cancers "overexpress the folate receptor." That means they thrive on folate...well that's my logic. It is a controversial subject so you should eat what you think is best.

There's also something interesting going on with cancer & calcium--as in malignant cells have lots more calcium channels than healthy cells. There's supposed to be a new chemo derived from shrew venom that targets the calcium channels.

A while back, I posted on the ovarian cancer board about the new chemo that is targeting the folate receptor (it now has a name: Farletuzumab). The shrew venom chemo info is over there, too, or just Google it. It's not easy to copy & paste links when I post from a smart phone.

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network