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Port removal

AZANNIE
Posts: 372
Joined: Mar 2011

How long after treatment was completed did everyone get their port removed?

Angela_K
Posts: 370
Joined: Jan 2011

After my first follow-up PET, 7 weeks out.

Angela_K
Posts: 370
Joined: Jan 2011

After my first follow-up PET, 7 weeks out.

Angela_K
Posts: 370
Joined: Jan 2011

After my first follow-up PET, 7 weeks out.

Angela_K
Posts: 370
Joined: Jan 2011

After my first follow-up PET, 7 weeks out.

z's picture
z
Posts: 1251
Joined: May 2009

Okay Angela, lol, I still have mine because I had pre cancerous polyps in the colon and after my next coloscopy in April of 2012 is clear I will have it removed at that time.

Angela_K
Posts: 370
Joined: Jan 2011

Sorry. Sorry. Sorry. And sorry. :)

z's picture
z
Posts: 1251
Joined: May 2009

lol Thats happened to me too.

lizdeli's picture
lizdeli
Posts: 521
Joined: Jul 2009

I had a pic line in my arm. It was removed the day after I finsihed chemo.
Liz

AZANNIE
Posts: 372
Joined: Mar 2011

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that the port will be removed after my next PET scan which will probably be in a few months. The port doesn't bother me, but it will be another "victory" when it's removed. Then I won't have to keep getting it flushed. My post treatment scan showed that the cancer was gone, but guess they want to make sure before port is removed.

z's picture
z
Posts: 1251
Joined: May 2009

Yes, they want to make sure and then you won't have to deal with it again. I just have mine because of my pre cancerous polyps and didn't want to have to have it put back in. I think I will be fine at my next colonoscopy, so they could remove it them.

BeaRose's picture
BeaRose
Posts: 45
Joined: Jul 2011

Had my last chemo in late Oct. and had my port out in March for my B-day

mp327's picture
mp327
Posts: 2855
Joined: Jan 2010

For me, the port went in on 7/21/08 and came out on 12/8/08. My med onc didn't mess around with getting that thing taken out!

shirlann54
Posts: 161
Joined: Aug 2011

I had a pic line too they had to take it out a week before my last treatment and put one in my other arm.Because i got a bad skin infection they said they had never seen one that bad.They took the other one out after my last chemo I was so glad .Because that arm started to get the same way.It took about mo to get it better.

AZANNIE
Posts: 372
Joined: Mar 2011

For those of you who have had your port removed...did it take place in doctor's office or as outpatient? I'm sure it's probably easier to take out than it was to put in. Just hope skin hasn't adhered to it... Will know next month if and when mine comes out...

RoseC's picture
RoseC
Posts: 502
Joined: Jun 2011

Mine was removed in an operating room during an outpatient visit - they used local anesthesia, didn't put me under. There WAS skin attached (I remember the doctor commenting on it - he said it meant I was a good healer), but it was fine. I just felt some pressure when they removed it. No problems.

AZANNIE
Posts: 372
Joined: Mar 2011

Thanks for the info. My port has been in for six months. It doesn't bother me, but having it removed will be another victory.

RoseC's picture
RoseC
Posts: 502
Joined: Jun 2011

Yes, I agree. I couldn't wait to get that thing out. Not that it hurt or anything - I just wanted it OUT.

Oh, and I didn't mean to say the external SKIN had adhered to the port. It didn't. What attached to it was internal. I don't know the word for what it was, but it was the stuff that attacks foreign entities inside your body. Maybe someone can help me with the right terminology? Anyway, taking it out didn't hurt - it left a small depression in that area (which I still have) but it's fine, doesn't bother me at all.

mp327's picture
mp327
Posts: 2855
Joined: Jan 2010

Having my port out was not a big deal. It was much easier than when they put it in. Both procedures were done in the radiology dept. of the hospital by an interventional radiologist. I had no problems either time, just a little soreness.

AZANNIE
Posts: 372
Joined: Mar 2011

I like the deportation term. Have you ever considered writing a book about the ins and outs of anal cancer? Seriously, you have a wealth of information about the subject with helpful hints and suggestions. Before I started treatment, I attended a one on one "chemo class" with one of the chemo nurses. I was given a packet of information about chemo and what to expect. However, radiation was a different story. Perhaps if I had gone to a cancer treatment facility (Mayo, MD Anderson, etc) things might have been different. My treatment was kind of al a carte, but apparently it worked!

Ann

mp327's picture
mp327
Posts: 2855
Joined: Jan 2010

That's very sweet of you to say. No, I've never considered writing a book about anal cancer, but I have considered writing a book about my life someday. Most of what I know about this cancer and how to deal with it I learned from other survivors, so it's impossible for me to take any credit.

I do think that many people who are newly diagnosed with anal cancer are woefully uninformed about the treatment and how to deal with side effects. I know that's how I felt--I really wasn't prepared for the magnitude of all the issues I dealt with during that time. Sadly, at the time of my treatment, I was not a part of any support website such as this one, so I went it alone for the most part. The doctors and nurses, as helpful as they try to be, do not have the knowledge that someone who's actually been through this has. That's why this support group is so very valuable to so many. I think most would agree, radiation is the "evil twin," if you will. I had no idea I would get so burned.

But the good news is, I am thriving at the 3-year post-treatment mark and it sounds like you are doing well too! There are many success stories. It's just hard to believe that when one is in the middle of this brutal treatment.

duckyann
Posts: 162
Joined: Jun 2009

I did not get my port out until 25 months post treatment. My doctors rule of thumb is 2 years post treatment which was fine with me but every doctor is different. Unfortunately since it was in that long it was harder to get out because of all the scar tissue around it. I had this done on July 7th. It did heal pretty fast but it still itches occasionally.

AZANNIE
Posts: 372
Joined: Mar 2011

You're right about the treatment being so brutal. I didn't know I would get so burned either. When I first started radiation I asked the nurse when I would turn red and she said I wouldn't. What a joke! Guess I should have asked when I would turn dark purple, blister, etc. About two weeks into treatment I started itching and mentioned it to the nurse. Her reply that that side effect was too early in treatment... I know the chemo intensified the radiation side effects. The rad onc did tell me it would get worse, but he didn't bother about checking down yonder to see what was happening (I saw him once a week and he listened to my heart and lungs - wrong end) until the rad tech called his attention to it because she thought I probably needed a break. He checked, but no break...ended up in the hospital a few days later for almost a week. I think some of the doctors and nurses were shocked at what they saw. I now know why burn victims are placed in a drug induced coma... When I returned to rad onc in Sept. for follow up that's when he looked at my rear end...should have told him hands off...oh well...despite it all I made it like we all did!
Maybe one of these days there will be a less brutal treatment. Maybe some kind of super duper cream that can be applied to the skin to block radiation, but still get to the cancer and maybe some kind of temporary stent in vaginal and anal area to prevent shrinkage???

mxperry220
Posts: 358
Joined: Mar 2011

Mine was taken out under anesthesia in the operating room in the hospital the same as when they put it in.

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