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Confusion about red dye on Canada thyroid list

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

This list http://www.thyroidcancercanada.org/userfiles/files/LID_English_Aug_2011.pdf is not consistent. It mentions Red #4 as forbidden, but then indicates to avoid all red dye.

I've had popsicles and jello with red 40, not 4.

Am I screwed ?

Anyone have the complete list of forbidden dyes ? Why are they forbidden ?

palmyrafan's picture
palmyrafan
Posts: 398
Joined: Mar 2011

When I first received my prescription for Synthroid in February, I was told by the doctor and the pharmacist to avoid red dyes. They didn't tell me why, but told me to avoid it. I have not been able to find out anything else about it.

Would appreciate some answers as well.

CLRRN's picture
CLRRN
Posts: 126
Joined: Jun 2010

I found the following on thyca.org

Red Dye #3. However, Red Dye #40 is OK. We suggest that you avoid red, orange, or brown processed food, pills, and capsules. Many red, red-orange, and brown food dyes contain iodine and should be avoided. The problem with food colors is specific to Red Dye FD&C #3 (erythrosine) ONLY. However, the problem is that some food labels do not specify which red dyes are used. Better safe than sorry. For medications, the best source is the Physician’s Desk Reference (PDR), which clearly states the ingredients. For example, Rocaltrol in the 0.5 mcg size is NOT good for the diet because it contains FD&C Red Dye #3. However, Rocaltrol 0.25 mcg does not and is safe for the diet (you can take two of them to get to the 0.5 mcg dose). Please always check with your physician.

I'm currently on Day 5 of LID....so far we've made homemade bread, mayo (yummy). Interesting diet.

Chris

sunnyaz
Posts: 582
Joined: Oct 2010

That's why I avoided anything with red, orange or yellow dye in it. I just felt safer that way. All in all, I had to get creative with the diet and actually found some foods that I still love to eat and make quite frequently still.
Julie-SunnyAZ

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

But I like popsicles. Which flavor is safe ?

amorriso
Posts: 186
Joined: Oct 2010

I'm not sure which flavors would be safe..so why not make your own out of fruit juices that are ok?

Just a thought.

Cheers

Andrea

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

Because those popsicles are 15 cals each and I like to lose weight. Which popsicles (and how) do you do them "homemade" ?

amorriso
Posts: 186
Joined: Oct 2010

I just use orange juice or lemonaid. I stay away from any type of artificial sweetners so I go full calorie.....compensated by extra gym time!

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

What's wrong with artificial sweeteners like Equal ? Ingredients = dextrose with maltodextrin and aspartame. LID lists don't forbid artificial sweeteners.

amorriso
Posts: 186
Joined: Oct 2010

The LID doesnt forbid sweetners. I have just made a personal choice not to use them. I saw a documentary on Nutrisweet etc, and that was enough. Too many chemicals for my liking....and I was a die hard diet coke person.

I've given up the diet sodas completely - if I want a coke or pepsi its the real thing! Just trying to eat a bit more natural I guess.

Cheers

palmyrafan's picture
palmyrafan
Posts: 398
Joined: Mar 2011

Not to be naive or anything here, but what about juices? Like Cranberry, Pomegranate, Pear, etc. Does anyone know if there are any dyes in those. I've read the labels and none are listed so I am really hoping that the labels are accurate.

And what about chocolate? Does anyone know if they use dyes in chocolate? Again, I've never read anything on the label, but these days, you just don't know.

Sorry if I sound stupid, but I really want to make sure I don't do anything to upset the apple cart.

Thanks!

Teresa

CherylMike
Posts: 118
Joined: Oct 2009

I just finished my year out scan and come to find out (via a post) that cranberries are naturally high in iodine. I ate cranberry raisons before the scan. The thyca website did not list cranberries on the do not eat list. They even had recipes with cranberries. I also learned (before the scan - via a post) that strawberries are a natural source of iodine. I am not sure where you can go for a complete list. I ate a limited amount of dark chocolate (not milk chocolate) as that was on the approved list via thyca. Hopefully someone on here knows where to go for a completed list. It would be difficult, but not impossible, to research everything that you would eat on the internet. Hopefully, someone can help!

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

Pimegranates: http://getsatisfaction.com/pom/topics/contents_of_trace_elements_in_pomwonderful_and_pomegranates

BUT from another website:

Iodine is an essential trace mineral crucial in the functioning of the thyroid gland, an organ that stores the minerals needed for the synthesis of our thyroid hormones. It is important to get adequate amounts of iodine in your diet to ensure the proper functioning of the this vital gland which controls much of our metabolism, detoxification, growth and development.

Research has shown that a lack of iodine foods in your diet may lead to enlargement of the thyroid gland, lethargy, fatigue, weakness of the immune system, slow metabolism, autism, weight gain and possibly even mental states such as anxiety and depression.

The good news is that there are many popular foods with iodine, all of which are easy to incorporate into your daily diet.

The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for iodine is 150 micrograms daily for everybody over the age of 14. The RDA for children ages 1-8 is 90/mcg every day, ages 9-13 is 120/mcg every day. If you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, it is recommended that you get 290/mcg every day.

The following list will discuss the top foods with iodine.

1. Sea vegetables

The ocean hosts the largest storehouse for iodine foods, including Kelp, Arame, Hiziki, Kombu, and Wakame. Kelp has the highest amount of iodine on the planet and one serving offers 4 times more than a daily minimum requirement. 1 tablespoon of Kelp contains about 2000/mcg of iodine, 1 tablespoon of Arame contains about 730/mcg of iodine, 1 tablespoon of Hiziki contains about 780/mcg of iodine, 1 one inch piece of Kombu contains about 1450/mcg of iodine, 1 tablespoon of Wakame contains about 80/mcg of iodine. I recommend sprinkling them in soups or on salads.

2. Cranberries

This antioxidant rich fruit is another great source of iodine. About 4 ounces of cranberries contain approximately 400/mcg of iodine. I would recommend buying fresh organic berries or juice. If you buy cranberry juice from the store, be cautious of how much sugar is in it.

3. Organic Yogurt

A natural probiotic, yogurt is an excellent iodine food you should add to your diet. One serving holds more than half of your daily needs. 1 cup contains approximately 90/mcg of iodine. Other than yogurt, here is a list of probiotic foods you should think about incorporating into your diet for added health benefits.

4. Organic Navy Beans
Many beans are a great food source of iodine, but navy beans may top the list. Just 1/2 cup of these beans contain about 32/mcg of iodine. Beans aren’t just an iodine food, they are also incredibly high in fiber.

5. Organic Strawberries
This tasty red fruit packs up to 10% of our daily iodine needs in a single serving. 1 cup of fresh strawberries has approximately 13/mcg of iodine. Try buying fresh, organic strawberries from your local farmer’s market.

6. Himalayan Crstal Salt

This form of salt, also known as gray salt, is an excellent source of naturally-occuring iodine. While many types of table salt are iodine-enriched, they are also stripped of all their natural health properties, and are chemically processed. Just one gram of himalayan salt contains approximately 500/mcg of iodine.

7. Dairy products
Milk and cheese are good sources of iodine, with one cup of milk holding around 55/mcg. To avoid many of the negative digestive effects of eating cow’s milk and cheese, I personally would recommend opting for raw organic goat’s milk and goat’s cheese; a healthier alternative for extracting iodine from dairy.

8. Potatoes

The common potato is an easy addition to most meals, and is one of the richest sources of iodine in the vegetable kingdom. With the skin, one medium-sized baked potato holds 60/mcg of iodine.

Taking Iodine Supplements

If you’re not a fan of the iodine foods listed above, then you can always take an iodine supplement. There are many different types of iodine supplements on the market, so knowing the differences between each is wise. I personally recommend taking a transformative nano-colloidal detoxified nascent iodine supplement, which the body is able to rapidly turn into its own effective mineral iodides for absorption throughout the body.

Do you have any other favorite foods with iodine? If so, please leave a comment down below.

~Dr. G

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

Nutritional Benefits

Oranges are an excellent source of vitamin C and flavonoids. One orange (130 grams) supplies nearly 100 percent of the recommended daily dietary intake of vitamin C.

When you eat a whole orange, it provides good dietary fiber. Leave in the albedo (the white matter under the peel) as much as possible as the albedo contains the highest amount of valuable bioflavonoids and other anti-cancer agents.

In addition, oranges are a good source of vitamin A, the B vitamins, amino acids, beta-carotene, pectin, potassium, folic acid, calcium, iodine, phosphorus, sodium, zinc, manganese, chlorine and iron.

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

That famous LID book has multiple recipes for using cranberries. What is happening here ?

sunnyaz
Posts: 582
Joined: Oct 2010

It's true, most foods have iodine in them. The important point is to remember that for that two week period we are encouraged to limit the amount of iodine that we intake. This way we will uptake the Radioactive stuff when we ingest it.

It's like this: If you fill a cup with gravel (iodine) and then you pour more gravel on top of it, it doesn't replace the existing gravel, it rolls off the top. So if you empty the cup of gravel (iodine) and then fill it (RAI), the gravel stays in the cup. I know this is a weird analogy but it made sense to me when I heard it.

Iodine is a very important mineral and after our RAI it is fine to ingest. In fact, contrary to popular belief, our Thyroid tissue isn't the only gland that takes up the important mineral. We need it for good cell function in many other glands and organs.

On artificial sweetener's: I personally am not an advocate of them. I believe they are dangerous. They don't really help you loose weight because they fool your metabolism into thinking it's getting sugar. One of the doctors I used to work for backs up this theory. You are better off metabolizing real sugar in small amounts than using artificial sweeteners such as Equal, NutraSweet and Sweet-n-Low. Saccharine is a big lie. The original maker of NutraSweet sold his patent and warned of the bad effects of it. I have found a safe sweetener that is all natural called Stevia or the brand name Truvia. It's just as sweet as real sugar with nothing artificial that I have discovered. Might want to do some internet searches to find out more information on all of these products if this subject interests you.

Blessings,
Julie-SunnyAZ

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

I've been using Equal for many years and have had had had had had had no side effects. And I can't find convincing evidence it is "bad" for humans. Have you seen studies on Stevia.

Not sure what you mean by "fool your metabolism". This is only a matter of making things taste sweet and palatable, not a matter of metabolism.

Stevia was sold at Costco warehouse, but they stopped it and restocked Equal because the Stevia didn't sell. Equal tastes better than the other non-nutritive sweeteners. Splenda would be second best after Equal.

sunnyaz
Posts: 582
Joined: Oct 2010

Below is a youtube new video related to the subject. I stopped drinking Diet Coke many years ago when I suffered from Bi-Polar Depression, Headaches and fatigue. I had heard about this when a friend of mine told me that she knew the daughter of the man that "invented" this artificial sweetener. Even he wouldn't ingest it and did not recommend it for consumption. It is said to cause many types of problems including cancer. While you are here you can see other related videos on the subject.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvFRLIjOLOU

Here is an interesting article worth reading if you are drinking/consuming artificial sweeteners and are having symptoms you can not explain.

http://www.321recipes.com/aspartame.html

Blessings,
Julie-SunnyAZ

CherylMike
Posts: 118
Joined: Oct 2009

While I was on my LID diet (in preparation for my year out scan), I ate cranberries. I did not realize that they were a natural source of iodine. I figured out strawberries were while posting on this site. (You were the one with the info - a belated thank you!). My scan showed no uptake, which I am so thankful for. However, I hope I did not compromise the scan by eating cranberries. I am waiting for the results of my blood draw (sent to CA). I am hoping it will back up the scan. Keep your fingers crossed for me!

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

Second draw ? thyroglobulin ?

CherylMike
Posts: 118
Joined: Oct 2009

It is a type of draw that they will use as a baseline for future bloodwork. That is why it is sent to CA, instead of being processed at the local level.

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

But what is the name of the blood test ?

MarinMark
Posts: 139
Joined: Aug 2011

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