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Lymph Nodes in Groins

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 343
Joined: May 2011

After my hysterectomy, I developed lymph nodes in my right groin.
I told my onco about it in one of my appointments, and said not to worry about it. It was just fluid from the lymph nodes he took out: total of 58.

He also told me not to touch it, but if I wanted do it once a month so I would not go crazy about it.

Do you have the same? If there any kind of massages you can do to move the fluid?

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Seems like no one has responded as I'll take a stab. I didn't have any issues with lymphs and had a mere 25 taken out. Not heard of 58 taken out...seems very high but sure doc had a good reason.

All I can relay is what I've known other friends to endure when lymphodema, which is fluid in the lymph nodes that can cause pain. There are specialisst who can help treat this and also use some elastic-type gloves or covering over the arms/legs to force the fluid out. Another suggestion, exercise, as this pushes fluid out as well.

Hope this helps and you're getting some relief!
Jan

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 343
Joined: May 2011

Fortunately, I have no pain.
However puffy, they are puffy.

Thank you

upsofloating's picture
upsofloating
Posts: 473
Joined: Dec 2009

Hi Fayard
Lymphadema can occur when the lymph system is compromised by damage or removal of lymph nodes. The system is designed to filter fluid out of the body thru a system of fairly fragile lymph vessels that flow through the nodes and eventually transporting waste materials from cellular processes out of the body. The swelling is asign that the lymph system is not able to handle the needed filtering. I have experienced this in an arm following lymph node removal from breast ca surgery as well as some additonal radiation damage. If it requires treatment it should be handled by a certified lymphedema therapist. They can teach massage techniques to learn how to facilitate the drainage. There are compression garments specifically designed to limit swelling that can be prescribed. It is important to learn the normal flow as well as the specific massage techniques that will work and not damage the lymph vessels.
Hope this helps.
Annie

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 343
Joined: May 2011

Thank you Annie!

lindaprocopio's picture
lindaprocopio
Posts: 2022
Joined: Oct 2008

I have my lymphodema well under control, but I was very proactive and saw a lymphodema specialist as soon as my ankles seemed puffy most of the time. When I was in my first remission (2009) I made an 11-hour flight to Greece, and that was my 1st experience with lymph fluid in the pelvic region. But my swelling was the entire pelvic mound just kind of puffed up like a puffy dinner roll, not enough to show in my clothes but very alarming to me. Do you have lymph nodes individually swollen? That doesn't sound like my experience with lymphodema in that region. I think of lymph fluid as building up in some pocket, and then gradually draining away, a very intermittant thing that comes and goes. You might want to get another opinion if you don't feel confident about that diagnosis. Also, you can do a lot of damage with the wrong kind of massage, so you really do need training so that you don't damage the skin that is already under stress of developing skin ulcers from the pressure of the fluid build up.

The lymphodema specialist said that lymph fluids building up in the groin/pelvic area are very common with gynecologic cancers. She suggested compression garments and I cannot overemphasize how important that is. I wear prescription grade compression socks daily (they come in all kinds of colors and look like trouser socks). For the pelvic swelling I bought compression bike shorts and 'Spanx' and even the very expensive compression pantyhose she recommended, but I have had only 1 or 2 instances where I ever had swelling in the pelvic region again. And I am happy to say that my ankles don't swell at all anymore either; I think I caught this very early. But COMPRESSION garments are the key to keeping lymphodema under control.

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 343
Joined: May 2011

Thank you for your input.
I have about two bumps in my right groin.
My onco said it was normal, and advised me not to touch them or look at them so I would not become worry about it.

This is the only part where I have them. No pain, just the bumps.
I will look into the compression garments.
It sound like something that could help me.

Thank you!

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