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Some Answers for Mercury in fish questions

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

This info is from womansday jan ‘8. It’s about a woman who ate fish pretty much daily and over the years developed mercury poisoning. Her symptoms were:

Fatique, lack of concentration, memory loss, coordination problems, depression, hair loss, insomnia, irritability, headaches, tremore, and vomiting. She also mentions a rash around her mouth.

Unfortunately as I read this list, I realized most of you already suffer from most of these symptoms. There is a simple blood test if you are wondering where you stand. Hope this helps.

Here’s a website—the mercurypolicyproject.org for info

There’s a chart
High Mercury fish were

tuna steaks, canned albacore tuna
Swordfish
Tielfish
King Mackerel
Shark
Wild salmon

Low mercury fish were

Shrimp
Pollack
Catfish
Salmon (the difference in the two salmon’s is probably the farm raised salmon is not in the ocean the the higher end of the food chain and the mercury it is exposed to is minimal.N’est pas????

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 494
Joined: Dec 2009

I will add occasional shrimp to my diet, but otherwise I am fine getting my protein from quinoa, lentils, and other non-meat, poultry, or fish sources. Also, fish is too expensive for me to eat regularly.

nempark
Posts: 592
Joined: Apr 2010

You make me laugh all the time even when you are serious. "I am just saying" What about blue fish. I love it. Be well. June

california_artist
Posts: 850
Joined: Jan 2009

Hey here's a maga list from the Natural Resources Defense Council

and I suppose it varies over time and circumstance.

When I was young, my brother used to break open thermometers and we would play with the mercury cause it was so cool to watch how it moved. Ah, for the good old days, when nobody knew anything about anything.

PROTECT YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY

Consumer Guide to Mercury in Fish
The list below shows the amount of various types of fish that a woman who is pregnant or planning to become pregnant can safely eat, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. People with small children who want to use the list as a guide should reduce portion sizes. Adult men, and women who are not planning to become pregnant, are less at risk from mercury exposure but may wish to refer to the list for low-mercury choices.

Protecting yourself -- and the fish: Certain fish, even some that are low in mercury, make poor choices for other reasons, most often because they have been fished so extensively that their numbers are perilously low. These fish are marked with an asterisk (read more below).

This list applies to fish caught and sold commercially. For information about fish you catch yourself, check for advisories in your state.

LEAST MERCURY
Enjoy these fish:
Anchovies
Butterfish
Catfish
Clam
Crab (Domestic)
Crawfish/Crayfish
Croaker (Atlantic)
Flounder*
Haddock (Atlantic)*
Hake
Herring
Mackerel (N. Atlantic, Chub)
Mullet
Oyster
Perch (Ocean)
Plaice
Pollock
Salmon (Canned)**
Salmon (Fresh)**
Sardine
Scallop*
Shad (American)
Shrimp*
Sole (Pacific)
Squid (Calamari)
Tilapia
Trout (Freshwater)
Whitefish
Whiting

MODERATE MERCURY
Eat six servings or less per month:
Bass (Striped, Black)
Carp
Cod (Alaskan)*
Croaker (White Pacific)
Halibut (Atlantic)*
Halibut (Pacific)
Jacksmelt
(Silverside)
Lobster
Mahi Mahi
Monkfish*
Perch (Freshwater)
Sablefish
Skate*
Snapper*
Tuna (Canned
chunk light)
Tuna (Skipjack)*
Weakfish (Sea Trout)

HIGH MERCURY
Eat three servings or less per month:
Bluefish
Grouper*
Mackerel (Spanish, Gulf)
Sea Bass (Chilean)*
Tuna (Canned Albacore)
Tuna (Yellowfin)*

HIGHEST MERCURY
Avoid eating:
Mackerel (King)
Marlin*
Orange Roughy*
Shark*
Swordfish*
Tilefish*
Tuna
(Bigeye, Ahi)*

* Fish in Trouble! These fish are perilously low in numbers or are caught using environmentally destructive methods. To learn more, see the Monterey Bay Aquarium and the Blue Ocean Institute, both of which provide guides to fish to enjoy or avoid on the basis of environmental factors.

** Farmed Salmon may contain PCB's, chemicals with serious long-term health effects.

Sources for NRDC's guide: The data for this guide to mercury in fish comes from two federal agencies: the Food and Drug Administration, which tests fish for mercury, and the Environmental Protection Agency, which determines mercury levels that it considers safe for women of childbearing age.

About the mercury-level categories: The categories on the list (least mercury to highest mercury) are determined according to the following mercury levels in the flesh of tested fish.

•Least mercury: Less than 0.09 parts per million

•Moderate mercury: From 0.09 to 0.29 parts per million

•High mercury: From 0.3 to 0.49 parts per million

•Highest mercury: More than .5 parts per million

Intro | Effects | Sources | Protect Yourself | For Medical Professionals

Trim your intake of mercury with these useful guides.

> NRDC's Mercury Calculator

Plus:
> Eating Tuna Safely
> Guide to Mercury in Fish
> Mercury in Sushi
> Sportfish Highest in Mercury

If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, use this guide to see what amounts of fish caught and sold commercially are safe to eat.

Related NRDC Webpages:

NRDC: Mercury Pollution: An End in Sight? Work begins on a global treaty to solve the world's mercury pollution problem

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