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To have a port

sleepless in jersey
Posts: 185
Joined: Feb 2011

Mom is now being torchered with the poking today, was 3 times. 1 of the nurses told her to consider it. They have to put heating pads on her veins to bring them up and out.

She's just so worried that its one more thing she has to worry about like infection etc... Could anyone tell me do people get infections from a port are you put under general anesthesia,is it painful after being placed in and do you feel that somethings there all the time?

We keep pushing the water on her and sometimes you know where that goes besides the fact she couldnt even put anything to her lips lastnight she got sick :(
It's only a handful of times it hasn't been bad.
Thanks for all your help...

missy6953
Posts: 14
Joined: Oct 2010

Hi...I have a port for over one yr. now and I have not had a problem at all. My veins are hard to get to and I was beginning to feel like I believe a pin cushion would feel. The port has been great! No more sticks!

Shiloah29
Posts: 17
Joined: May 2011

My husband has a port. It has been so nice. No poking and proding for veins. It was put in as out patient but at the hospital. He was put under light sedation and he has had no problem. The skin is pulled back over it and there was only a slight incision. When he goes for chemo there is nothing more than a pin prick. I feel that you are less likely to get and infection from a port than all the IV sticks.

mamacita5's picture
mamacita5
Posts: 254
Joined: May 2010

Ask the doctor about a PICC line. This was placed in my upper inner arm with just a local anesthetic and was done by an RN. My chemo nurses were having a horrible time getting access to my veins so it was decided this would be best for me.Everything was done through my line including chemo and blood draws. What a blessing! Best of all no surgery and on my last chemo they just pulled it out!

Here is something I found on the internet for you.

A PICC line is, by definition and per its acronym, a peripherally inserted central catheter. It is long, slender, small, flexible tube that is inserted into a peripheral vein, typically in the upper arm, and advanced until the catheter tip terminates in a large vein in the chest near the heart to obtain intravenous access. It is similar to other central lines as it terminates into a large vessel near the heart. However, unlike other central lines, its point of entry is from the periphery of the body and the extremities. And typically the upper arm is the area of choice.

A PICC line provides the best of both worlds concerning venous access. Similar to a standard IV, it is inserted in the arm, and usually in the upper arm under the benefits of ultrasound visualization. Also, PICCs differ from peripheral IV access but similar to central lines in that a PICCs termination point is centrally located in the body allowing for treatment that could not be obtained from standard periphery IV access. In addition, PICC insertions are less invasive, have decreased complication risk associated with them, and remain for a much longer duration than other central or periphery access devices.

Using ultrasound technology to visualize a deep, large vessel in the upper arm, the PICC catheter is inserted by a specially trained and certified PICC nurse specialist. Post insertion at the bedside, a chest x-ray is obtained to confirm ideal placement. The entire procedure is done in the patient's room decreasing discomfort, transportation, and loss of nursing care.

A PICC line may requested for a variety of treatment options which include some of the following:

-Prolonged IV antibiotic treatment;

-IV access obtainable by less invasive and longer lasting methods;

-Multiple accesses obtainable with one access line;

-TPN Nutrition;

-Chemotherapy;;

-IV access related to physiological factors; and

-Home or sub-acute discharge for extended treatment.

PICCs are frequently used to obtain central venous access for patients in acute care, home care and skilled nursing care. Since complication risks are less with PICC lines, it is preferred over other forms of central venous catheters. A PICC is not appropriate for all patients. Proper selection to determine the appropriateness of this device is required.

A PICC line can be used for antibiotics, pain medicine, chemotherapy, nutrition, or for the drawing of blood samples. PICCs can be inserted by radiologists, physician assistants or certified registered nurses. They are inserted using ultrasound technology at the bedside or ultrasound wit fluoroscopy. Chest radiographs are also used to confirm placement of the PICC tip if it was not inserted using fluoroscopy.

missy6953
Posts: 14
Joined: Oct 2010

My port was implanted in the right side of my chest and I was put to sleep for the procedure. It was done by a doctor - not an RN.

Shiloah29
Posts: 17
Joined: May 2011

AS I said earlier my husband has a port but while he was in the hospital for his lung surgery they inserted a picc line. They both work well and neither were hard to have put in place.They were both done in the hospital. We left the picc in when he left the hospital thinking they could use it for his chemo treatments. Well, before we went home they began to show me how it had to be flushed everyday and cleaned with disinfectant swabs etc. and the site covered with a clear cover. Not being a nurse or anything, I was nervous about doing all of this. I was really glad when the oncology doctors did not want to use it. They instead had a port put in. It is so much better. There is no care to be done at home and you would not even know it was there. The picc line was on the underside of his arm and always in the way and he had to be so careful when putting his shirt on.

sleepless in jersey
Posts: 185
Joined: Feb 2011

Thank you all so much for your info. and your quick responses on Port/PICC this is alot to absorb and to share with Mom.
Much Love to all...

DianaJ
Posts: 15
Joined: Mar 2011

I had a port inserted may 31 after my second chemo infusion caused my arm veins to restrict flow. My third chemo using the port went fine and it will be flushed and cleaned by the effusion center once a month. It feels weird to have it,but should make blood draws and injections much easier. My port was inserted by interventional radiology doctor at ucla hospital. my oncologist preferred me to have a port instead of PICC. the port can be in place for a year or more.

DianaJ
Posts: 15
Joined: Mar 2011

I had a port inserted may 31 after my second chemo infusion caused my arm veins to restrict flow. My third chemo using the port went fine and it will be flushed and cleaned by the effusion center once a month. It feels weird to have it,but should make blood draws and injections much easier. My port was inserted by interventional radiology doctor at ucla hospital. my oncologist preferred me to have a port instead of PICC. the port can be in place for a year or more.

traci43's picture
traci43
Posts: 420
Joined: Jul 2007

I had both a PICC and a port. Love the port!!!!! It's a bit more invasive and a Dr. has to do it rather than an RN, yet the potential insertion complications are virtually the same. Once healed, the port is much easier to take care of than the PICC. With a PICC you have to wrap it with plastic wrap to shower and I never tried swimming with it. With the port there is none of that because it is under the skin. A PICC last 3 years, a port 10 years. I plan on beinging around long enough to need a new port! Compared to IV both are way better! Best of luck in your decision.

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