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Abdominal/Incision Pain After daVinci Surgery ? (Hernia?)

321Hike
Posts: 3
Joined: May 2011

Hello… I am 59, and about 6 weeks past a daVinci prostatectomy surgery. My “plumbing” recovery is moving along pretty well, but I have lingering abdominal muscle aches in the vicinity of one of the incision/portholes (upper left, the one close to the bottom of the ribcage).

It is not overwhelming pain, but rather a steady dull ache that feels most often like someone is “kneading” bread down there, back & forth, a series of many small contractions and little spasms in maybe a 2-3 inch radius area. It is most noticeable when “scrunched up” a bit (as when sitting), or when making a quick move to bend over at an odd angle.

Externally there is no obvious swelling, oozing, pus, or redness, and I have no elevated temperature. I do not feel anything down there like I think a hernia would feel like, but not sure. I do about 1-2 hours of light walking each day, but I have not done any heavy lifting since surgery. The odd thing is pain at just at this one spot. No pain on right side at all, or other incision ports. This is not “digestive” pain; that’s all been fine.

So a few questions for you’all: has anyone else had lingering abdominal muscle ache/pain at the incision areas after daVinci surgery? of what type and how long did it last ? do the internal stitches in there maybe take a long time to dissolve or something ? scar tissue ? is it better to lightly stretch and exercise, or better to “baby” it along very gently ? is there anyone who developed an incisional hernia after daVinci ? if so, what does a hernia feel like, and how did you diagnose/treat it ?

Thank you all very much for any feedback !

VascodaGama's picture
VascodaGama
Posts: 1569
Joined: Nov 2010

321Hike

The best place to get help in controlling the pain is the hospital where you had surgery. You should call them the soonest and inform the staff about your symptoms. They will recommend you any medications or advise you on a rehabilitation proper for your recovery.
Surgery is not the same as treating a wound. Cutting, stitching and sawing flesh needs prime care post internment, even if it were done 6 weeks previous. You could be experiencing internal bleeding.

They will answer all those questions and give you peace of mind.

Wishing you recover to the fullest.
VGama

Beau2
Posts: 242
Joined: Sep 2010

Hey Hike,

I had an incisional hernia at the site of the naval incision (following DaVinci). It started as a small lump and grew to about the size of a plum or small peach. I don't remember much pain, but I sure could feel something was out of place, and when I walked I could feel it trying to poke through.

Anyhow, the fix was pretty simple. A surgeon, put a mesh patch in behind the incision. It took less than an hour and the recovery was real quick, no pain. My naval scar went from about 2 inches to about four inches.

I first went to my PCa surgeon who said that it was an incisional hernia, and he refered me to a general surgeon. I would "baby" your incision untill you let your surgeon look at it.

321Hike
Posts: 3
Joined: May 2011

Thanks very much for taking the time to reply. I took your advice and was able to get into the doctor’s office on short notice. They poked and prodded, and could neither see nor feel any evidence of an incisional hernia. They said internal bleeding would manifest with being quite sick with fever, which is absent. Test showed no blood in urine. They said incisional/abdominal aches can often last a few months, especially in the zone where daVinci instrument trauma may be greatest (left-center). They stressed that although robotic, this was still “major surgery”. They said to continue walking with light stretching, but taking it easy, for another few weeks. I have a follow-up doctor visit, with first PSA test post-surgery, in six weeks. Thanks again for the feedback…

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