CSN Login
Members Online: 2

Alkaline diet versus the anti-cancer diet

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

For the past year or so, I have been designing my meals according to an alkaline foods chart--aiming for a 70/30 ratio between alkaline and acidic foods, which is what the chart recommends. Numerous studies, including those completed at top cancer hospitals, have shown that some cancer cells grow faster in an acidic solution. They've also indicated that some chemotherapy drugs become more effective if the area around a tumor cell is altered to be more alkaline.

Nevertheless, in comparing the alkaline diet with Servan-Schreiber's anti-cancer diet, an alkaline diet's effectiveness is based almost exclusively on reducing the inflammation in the body that promotes cancer growth. The anti-cancer diet seems to go several steps further by ALSO recommended foods that force cancer cells to die through apoptosis or that detoxify cancer-causing toxins or protect against free radicals.

I've become mostly vegetarian and have eliminated almost all dairy (I use a little bit of skim milk), which is in strict adherence to alkaline diet principles. Also, the alkaline diet really limits grains and beans. The AC diet, on the other hand, allows limited meat and dairy from grass-fed animals and encourages consumption of whole-grain breads and pastas as well as all kinds of legumes.

I'd really like to get a discussion going among women on this board who have an opinion about which of these diets seems to make the most sense. Help, please!

Jill

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I've heard all the stories as well and swear by the Anti cancer book and do follow it. I've been to a nutritionist a few times, finding with our cancer to avoid dairy and watch the meats, as want them to be grass fed. I drink protein drinks twice per day and use Almond milk to replace any dairy...avoiding any cheeses, but use lots of spices. I do have the occasional ice cream but really try to go with fresh fruits.

Alkaline diet is good, but can't say I've been real true to it. A very well known doc in California area who does a lot of studies on vitamin D and other areas, suggested if we have a real good diet (such as Anti-Cancer book) we shouldn't need to monitor as much on alkaline. Now I do know certain foods/beverages are worse such as coffee with acid, so I just stick to my green tea.

I've heard so many things about the grass fed chicken, etc, that I did purchase some of it at Whole Foods. After seeing my grocery bill continually going up, I chose to just go mainly vegetarian with only adding beans, lentils and fish. ONly so much money in the till for all this stuff and in the end, I never was a real heavy meat eater, therefore, it was much easier for me to stop. One thing I've been trying to add is more nuts, such as almonds, brazil nuts, cashews, etc, to get more protein as miss a lot without the meats/dairy.

One area I've really been reading up on is Vitamin D. This is huge with disease and the research out there is astounding, pushing us to take supplements and to really increase our levels, plus adding calcium.

What I take out of all my research and reading, if I read everything and changed with each topic I'd never be set in a "me" way...always changing according to someone elses ideas/research.

Where did you get your list on foods with acid/alkaline? You mentioned -- "The anti-cancer diet seems to go several steps further by ALSO recommended foods that force cancer cells to die through apoptosis or that detoxify cancer-causing toxins or protect against free radicals." Can you expand on this a bit more as not understanding this in PLAIN ENGLISH.

Anxious to hear from others...great topic Jill~

Jan

upsofloating's picture
upsofloating
Posts: 473
Joined: Dec 2009

I too find these two "best" dietary management tools to be in conflict which does keep me from fully embracing either one. I have a tendency to lean toward the Servan-Schreiber anti-cancer approach as the body's natural controls are to maintain the normal physiologic acid-alkaline balance. Does presence of cancer interrupt this process or has something else done so that encourages cancer cell proliferation??? I probably need to do way more research on this subject! So, likewise, "Help, please!"
Annie

Susanna23
Posts: 66
Joined: Dec 2010

I find the anticancer diet much easier - been following it increasingly since December when I bought the book. The alkaline idea doesn't fit very well with what I know of biochemistry whereas the cell-based explanations in the Servan-Schreiber book make a lot of sense to me. But I suspect there is likely some overlap between the two approaches. I am very interested in the comments about vitamin D. Last year, before I was diagnosed, the link between vitamin D and cancer was brought to my attention by a nutritionist and journalist whose work I respect. So I began on 1000 IU vitamin D after diagnosis, stopped it during chemo, then started again a couple of weeks ago. Had been planning to get my vit D levels measured at private clinic to adjust my dose and then to my surprise my GP has ordered a (free) test as part of a routine blood screen. Though I have an annual lipid profile done and diabetes, kidney, liver, this is the first time vitamin D has been tested - I didn't think to ask but suspect the interest is in osteoporosis rather than cancer on her part. Any of you had a vitamin D level measured? It should be 40-60 ng/mL (100-150 nmol/mL).
Off to make a spinach and orange salad now....
Looking forward to hearing more on this
Susan

upsofloating's picture
upsofloating
Posts: 473
Joined: Dec 2009

Earlier this year as part of my annual, my PCP ordered Vit D level. Mine was just in lower end of "lab normal range" but below 40 you mention. He recommended 1000 IU daily which I started. Why not during chemo? I just restarted chemo yesterday.
Annie

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Good site to go for researching Vit D is:

www.grassrootshealth.net

Two well-know docs and researches are shown at first page of site --

Dr. Heaney
Dr. Garland

I have my serum levels tested (vit D) at each of my follow-up oncologist appts. Mine is around 65 ng which is right where we need it if battling cancer. Sounds high but if you do lots of reading on the site above, you'll gain knowledge and find it helpful. My nutritionist as well is watching my serum and calcium levels. We need both vitamins as they work together. I take 5000 iu of vitamin D and in winter months when we're not exposed to sunlight, increase it to 7000 iu. We depend on vitamins as we just don't get enough D in our diets.

My last DEXA scan showed "normal" as 2 years prior it was "abnormal with thinning at top of hip". I'm a believer, especially when you realize many of these docs have been doing this research for 20 - 30 years.

I've got more links and data if anyone has interest. Happy to share!
Jan

---------------------

Higher Vitamin D Intake Needed to Reduce Cancer Risk ---

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha have reported that markedly higher intake of vitamin D is needed to reach blood levels that can prevent or markedly cut the incidence of breast cancer and several other major diseases than had been originally thought. The findings are published February 21 in the journal Anticancer Research

While these levels are higher than traditional intakes, they are largely in a range deemed safe for daily use in a December 2010 report from the National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine.

"We found that daily intakes of vitamin D by adults in the range of 4000-8000 IU are needed to maintain blood levels of vitamin D metabolites in the range needed to reduce by about half the risk of several diseases - breast cancer, colon cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes,” said Cedric Garland, DrPH., professor of family and preventive medicine at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center. “I was surprised to find that the intakes required to maintain vitamin D status for disease prevention were so high – much higher than the minimal intake of vitamin D of 400 IU/day that was needed to defeat rickets in the 20th century."

"I was not surprised by this” said Robert P. Heaney, MD, of Creighton University, a distinguished biomedical scientist who has studied vitamin D need for several decades. “This result was what our dose-response studies predicted, but it took a study such as this, of people leading their everyday lives, to confirm it."

The study reports on a survey of several thousand volunteers who were taking vitamin D supplements in the dosage range from 1000 to 10,000 IU/day. Blood studies were conducted to determine the level of 25-vitamin D – the form in which almost all vitamin D circulates in the blood.

"Most scientists who are actively working with vitamin D now believe that 40 to 60 ng/ml is the appropriate target concentration of 25-vitamin D in the blood for preventing the major vitamin D-deficiency related diseases, and have joined in a letter on this topic,” said Garland. “Unfortunately, according a recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, only 10 percent of the US population has levels in this range, mainly people who work outdoors."

Interest in larger doses was spurred in December of last year, when a National Academy of Sciences Institute of Medicine committee identified 4000 IU/day of vitamin D as safe for every day use by adults and children nine years and older, with intakes in the range of 1000-3000 IU/day for infants and children through age eight years old.

While the IOM committee states that 4000 IU/day is a safe dosage, the recommended minimum daily intake is only 600 IU/day.

"Now that the results of this study are in, it will become common for almost every adult to take 4000 IU/day," Garland said. “This is comfortably under the 10,000 IU/day that the IOM Committee Report considers as the lower limit of risk, and the benefits are substantial.” He added that people who may have contraindications should discuss their vitamin D needs with their family doctor.

"Now is the time for virtually everyone to take more vitamin D to help prevent some major types of cancer, several other serious illnesses, and fractures," said Heaney said.

Other co-authors of the article were Leo Baggerly, PhD, and Christine French. More useful facts are available from Anticancer Research; www.GrassrootsHealth.net; and the National Academy of Sciences - Institute of Medicine, www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-for-Calcium-and-Vitamin-D.aspx.

missbabsonmars's picture
missbabsonmars
Posts: 29
Joined: Jun 2010

I am a strict observer of the Servan-Schreiber anti-cancer diet, and am essentially a 100% vegan, no sugar eater. It is hard to know what is best since there seem to be some valid choices, as indicated by research. For me, this is the diet that makes the most sense and is the one recommended by the integrative medical oncologist I am consulting with in addition to the the oncologist who is overseeing my standard medical treatment. I also take mushroom supplements, Vitamin D supplements, and TONS of green tea.

Babs

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

I've been so frustrated trying to follow an alkaline diet. Although I can have most fruits and vegetables, I am unable to get enough healthy (for me) protein and grains. The list of alkaline proteins includes only almonds, chestnuts, millet, tempeh (fermented), tofu(fermented), and whey protein powder. Almost all grains are considered acidifying, as are blueberries, lentils, beans, and red wine, which I feel are so healthy (with red wine in moderation).

I don't eat soy products, and I'm not happy making a meal of whey protein. I eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, but I MUST be able to have quinoa, lentils, spelt, beans, and nuts other than almonds (although I consume almonds more than any other nuts) as my protein sources.

I eliminate most meat (maybe once a month, I crave lean poultry or grass-fed beef; and I usually give in to the craving because I feel that my body is telling me it needs the food), all sugar (even Stevia), and have large salads every day. Main meals are grains, beans, and greens, with a handful of nuts.

This is the way I will continue to eat. There is too much conflicting information out there, so I am going with my "gut."

culka's picture
culka
Posts: 158
Joined: Oct 2009

How many grams of protein do you need?
From www.30bananasaday.com I downloaded cronometer and now I'm almost dead on how many calories, how much water, calcium, omega-3, .... I consume.
According Dr. Doug Graham we should eat 80% carbs, 10% fats and 10% proteins. 2000 kcal a day is 200 kcal from proteins. 1g of protein is 4 kcal, which is about 50 g and even WHO suggested about 50 g of proteins a day.

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Anywho--I think if you eat like you're a horse with Sicilian lineage, and add a bit of turmeric/pepper/olive oil--you should be fine.I had forgotten that veggies have wonderful omega-3's.

Eat mostly veggies and fruit, some protein from beans and legumes and occasionally fish/turkey/chicken, no peanuts, due to the aflotoxins, which can contribute to liver cancer, you should be fine.

You ever seen an unhealthy horse in the wild where there is adequate forage and a mountain lion hasn't attacked it?????? WEll, there you have it, just pretend that horse has a penchant for fruits and can't you just image him with a cleaver trying to catch a chicken or turkey for dinner. Or sitting by the stream with a fishing pole??? Ah, those horses have the life, don't they.

If you can't laugh --- how in the heck are you going to ever get better??????

All of you be well. I love your strength and spirits.

I'm just saying.

culka's picture
culka
Posts: 158
Joined: Oct 2009

Why are you saying you don't remember anything? You got my name right.

Yes, you are right, we have to make our life simple as possible. Not just food, but house, furniture, clothes, cars....

By the way, sometimes I feel like horse.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

hope it helps

Gracegoi's picture
Gracegoi
Posts: 59
Joined: Aug 2011

off topic

Fayard's picture
Fayard
Posts: 343
Joined: May 2011

I am going with you!

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

I thought about this question. Came up with, aren't they the same thing with different labels. Just one spells out in acid/alkaline degrees, the other. And the other spells out how the particular foods will effect cancer and in what exact manner. Both use the same premise-that one can and should be aware of how foods can be paramount in the battle against cancer.

If you follow the anti-cancer diet, won't you be in the 80-20----wait, I get it. Not necessarily, eh? So then use the one to refine the other, but neither one isn't saying eat whatever, they both point in the right direction, I would overall use the acid/alkaline knowledge to choose how alkaline I needed to be. and I wholeheartedly think without that core awareness, one can get in a heck of a lot of trouble, such as I did with the preponderance of brown rice, which is good for me but fed my cancer for nearly a year. While I was totally ignorant of what I was doing to myself. With my knowledge came my power, which I used to the fullest degree in the beginning to slow my cancer down enough to be symptom free nearly four years later. I don't kid myself. I know I still have some of those cells. I know if I completely revert to what i had been doing, that I will have the same result, a large tumor. Consequently, I intend on having a basic awareness that leads me to make well thought out choices, but on a more maintenance status, forever.

With knowledge CAN come power.
should be closely followed by
a LITTLE KNOWLEDGE is indeed a dangerous thing.

Were I ever in dire straights, Stage lV say, I would go to wheat grass exclusively for a short period of time, to give me some time to think and formulate a dire straights plan.

I would exclude to the highest degree any meats, proteins, sugars(carbs) milk(casein) alcohol, artificial sweeteners, as these would cause me to have a build up of fluid due to all the waste products of the cancer cells growing like mad along with the burden that those things would put on my liver.

Knowledge only has power, when it is used.

I'm just saying.

And Jill, have a lovely time with your guests in the city.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

Thank you for addressing this dilemma. The food charts that I've found for both the anticancer approach and the alkaline/acid diet vary just enough to be frustrating for me. My way of dealing with the differences if to look at a bunch of different (reliable to me) lists and choose my foods based on what the majority thinks. I've found that even the lists of foods' PH vary in their reported numbers. So...these are the dietary approaches that I am inflexible about:

--NO sugar at all, no artificial sweeteners (even agave nectar and stevia). Instead, I puree ripe bananas, figs, and other high alkaline fruit to create a sugary paste. I then add the puree to my oatmeal or to my occasional cup of lowfat yogurt. Stevia is apparently highly alkaline, but I don't trust myself to use it since I want to purge myself of the need to eat very sweet things.

--No high-fat dairy at all. I use almond milk in place of cow's milk and recommend to those women here who have trouble making this switch to start out with a half and half mixture and then gradually remove the cow's milk. Buttermilk is listed on my chart as being alkaline.

--I always use olive oil in place of butter,margarine, and corn oil. Other semi-alkaline oils, according to my chart, include borage oil, flax seed oil, evening primrose oil, sesame oil, and sunflower oil.

--Absolutely no red meat.

--On most of the anti-cancer or alkaline charts I've seen, many fruits are listed as neutral, neither acidic or alkaline. However, ripe (speckled) bananas, sour cherries, fresh coconut, dried and raw figs, lemons, limes, avocados, and tomatoes are either moderately or highly very alkaline. Again, according to THIS list, the fruits that should be avoided include mandarin oranges, pineapples, pomegranates, raspberries, and rose hips.

--Grains and legumes are problematic, and I've found this category to be the most frustrating in terms of variations on the different alkaline and anticancer charts. Brown rice is a no-no on ALL of the charts I've seen, as is wheat. However, buckwheat, kamut, lentils, spelt, and tofu are apparently moderately alkaline; and white navy beans, lima beans, and soy are pretty highly alkaline. I stay away from soy. I have oatmeal for breakfast and eat either a sprouted grain bread (apparently moderately alkaline) or one that includes spelt and/or buckwheat.

--With nuts, almond and pine nuts are the most alkaline, with peanuts and pistachios being highly acidic.

--The best roots are beets and red and black radishes. Other roots are moderately alkaline.

--The vegetable category is probably the easiest, since none of the FRESH ones are very acidic. The most alkaline veggies among those that are most familiar include cucumbers, kale, cabbage, jicama, sprouted seeds, spinach, and wheat grass. These are all extremely alkaline.

--In the beverage category, I stick to vegetable juices (low sodium V8 is not bad if you don't do your own juicing), green tea, and water. Freshly squeezed fruit juices are ok in extreme moderation (like half a cup of OJ a day), with the warning that bombarding our systems with that much concentrated sugar is not a good thing.

I don't know if this list will help, but I guess it helps ME to have written it all out. Also, in going back to my research, Claudia is right: an 80/20 alkaline to acid ratio is the one recommended most often.

Hey, Claudia, thanks for the good wishes about my weekend visitor. We are likely going to spend most of our time at OWS. Hope all is well with you.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

With all the discussion of this topic, what are you using to test your body's ph levels to assure that the diet is working??

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Since the question is not really either or I still don't see a problem. You can eat whatever you choose in moderation and with a balancing food approach. Right? You shouldn't have to have a list of no-no's. There is really no reason to not ever have a fruit that is say more acidic than another fruit, that I can really discern.

Claudia

Daisy, my big toe gives me a red light when I've gone to the dark side, since I became not only aware of the acid/alkaline issue and started to practice food awareness, I have not had any further gout flareups, but you're right I should get some litmus paper.

I was thinking about litmus paper and wondered why one couldn't use it to test the ph of foods-oh, never mind, I answered my own question when my brain stepped in and said hey, ah you there, it is the ash that is produced in your body, not the ph of the fruit while it's sitting on the kitchen counter that matters. Good thing my brain is paying attention.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

You are absolutely right about not needing an either/or approach; these diets ARE all about balance. I should have indicated that this is the way that I need to follow the diet because I tend to overindulge in "red light" foods if I start eating just one portion.

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

What happened to all the discussion about using an anti-inflammatory diet? I remember that being mentioned quite often a while ago.

JoAnn

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

is that alkaline foods ARE anti-inflammatory, so following the alkaline/acid diet will help eliminate inflammation and those conditions that it exacerbates or causes.

Jill

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Do you feel that eating red light foods is a precursor or will lead to imbibing in the red light district?

How you doin'?

Just trying to lighten things up. : ~ )

RoseyR
Posts: 464
Joined: Feb 2011

I try to limit fruit to berries (Anti-Cancer especially extolls raspberries for their ellagic (sp?) acid that kills cancer cells, and I plied my morning oatmeal for months with either blueberries or raspberries. Now you're saying they're too acidic?

And FIGS, which I love, I stay away from because I've assumed they're far too SWEET. No? Please tell me I can eat them; I saw dried fruit of any kind prohibited in several books because of their sugar content.

Find it hard to believe that brown rice can be bad for us especially as it's such a mainstay of macrobiotic diets, which purport to be anti-cancer. As long as we eat them with lentils or beans, aren't they providing a complete protein, free of animal fats?

At one vegetarian restaurant where I love to eat, they serve "African peanut stew" full of yams and carrots (great carotenes), a bit of kale, but also some crushed peanuts but now Claudia warns us to stay away from them, too.

And in another dish they serve seitan, kale, a bit of pineapple, and a few small pieces of roasted corn bread (I forget its name) that I just fell in love with but am afraid of the corn bread.

Last night I had dinner with a friend and we both had a large glass of cabernet. Should probably renounce that as well?

And though I'd drunk nothing but green tea for the past year, broke down a few weeks ago and started to have one Americano every morning at local coffee house: it's one shot of expresso in good filtered water with half the caffeine of regular coffee. Should I give this up too?

Claudia, what DO you eat? What's a typical daily menu for you?

Walking on tenterhooks but not yet joyless; despite initial doubts, always love my meals!

Rosey

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

Claudia shared a chart a day or two ago (in a related diet thread) that I think is good. Maybe that will help you make your food choices.

I'll share what I eat on a typical day:

Breakfast: oatmeal with mashed ripe bananas, raisins, crushed walnuts, and almond milk.

Lunch: a big salad with organic spinach, romaine, often kale, tomatoes, cucumbers, avocado, and beans. If I don't have salad for lunch, I'll have it for dinner--always full of fresh vegetables and sometimes apples or mangoes.

Dinner: I often make a soup--yesterday, I cooked butternut squash and yams and pureed them with curry powder, cinnamon and extra turmeric. This soup was really easy, but I also make a carrot-ginger bisque that starts with sauteed onions, adds carrots and fresh ginger, almond milk, and then I puree the whole thing.

A staple for me is a chick pea and yam curry, shared by Karen and included in the recipes thread. I also cook quinoa and keep it in the fridge to eat with steamed vegetables and beans. I eat lots of beans but try to stay with the ones that are most alkaline.

For a treat, I make a smoothie with a ripe banana and almond milk--it tastes just like a milkshake. Also, I will peel and cook apples and eat them with a little bit of cinnamon and some almond milk.

I am not perfect, and I stray when I eat out. I do have a glass or two of red wine a couple of times a month, which I still believe have a beneficial effect. Also, when I feel a craving for more protein, I will have some fish, chicken, canned tuna, or sardines.

Good luck!

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Sure makes sense that acidic foods cause inflammation, leading to disease. Check out below from Livestrong.com...excellent points.

--------------------------------------

Are Seaweed & Alkaline Foods Anti-Inflammatory?

Sep 2, 2011 | By Tracey Roizman, D.C.

Tracey Roizman, D.C., has been a freelance writer and speaker on natural and preventive health since 1995. She holds a B.S. in nutritional biochemistry, chiropractic degree, and is a postgraduate diplomate in functional neurology.
Are Seaweed & Alkaline Foods Anti-Inflammatory? Photo Credit Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

Varieties of seaweed and alkalizing fruits and vegetables provide nutrient-dense and low-calorie additions to your healthy diet. These foods, which form the basis of many vegetarian styles of eating, can help delay the effects of aging and prevent some degenerative diseases. Among the health benefits of seaweed and alkalizing foods are their inflammation-reducing properties.
Fruits and Vegetables

Fruits and vegetables contribute the bulk of alkalizing benefits in your diet. These foods also counteract the acidifying effects of proteins and processed carbohydrates, according to Christine Lydon, author of the book, "Ten Years Thinner: Six Weeks to a Leaner, Younger-Looking You." The Western diet, high in meat protein, dairy, white flour and sugar, tips the acid-alkaline balance toward the acid end of the pH scale, which promotes inflammation. The alkalizing effects of fruits and vegetables also bring your urine into a more alkaline pH, decreasing kidney inflammation and stress and reducing your risk for developing kidney stones.
Seaweed

Seaweed is rich in magnesium, a mineral that helps alkalize your body. Seaweed also contains eicosapentanoic acid, an essential fatty acid known to decrease inflammation; folate; and vitamin K, according to nutritionist Barbara Rowe, author of the book, "Anti-Inflammatory Foods for Health: Hundreds of Ways to Incorporate Omega-3 Rich Foods into Your Diet to Fight Arthritis, Cancer Heart Disease and More." In a study published in the February 2011 issue of the journal, "International Immunopharmacology," doses of vitamin K inhibited inflammatory signalling molecules called cytokines, decreased levels of free radicals and decreased levels of tissue-destroying molecules.
Multiple Effects

Excess acid-forming foods in the diet cause a host of health problems, including inflammation, infection and joint pain, according to Claudia Pillow, Ph.D., author of "The Gluten-Free Good Health Cookbook: The Delicious Way to Strengthen Your Immune System and Neutralize Inflammation." By contrast, alkalizing foods generally contain higher nutrient value, which contributes to pathways that quell inflammation. Additionally, an acid pH damages the lining of your intestine, allowing toxins and pathogens to enter your bloodstream and activate your immune system. Illness and allergy, both of which increase inflammation, are possible outcomes.
Lemons

Lemons, in particular, are highly alkalizing and can decrease your levels of inflammation-promoting histamine, according to a study published in the June 2011 issue of the journal, "Phytomedicine." In the study, a combination of lemon and quince fruit reduced histamine release and inhibited immunoglobulin E, an antibody associated with allergic reactions and asthma. Squeeze some fresh lemon into a glass of water for an alkalizing start to your day.
References

* "Ten Years Thinner: Six Weeks to a Leaner, Younger-Looking You"; Christine Lydon; 2008
* "Anti-Inflammatory Foods for Health: Hundreds of Ways to Incorporate Omega-3 ..."; Lisa M. Davis, et al.; 2008
* "International Immunopharmacology"; Immune Responses to Novel Allergens and Modulation of Inflammation by Vitamin K3 Analogue: a ROS Dependent Mechanism; V. Kohli, et al.; February 2011
* "The Gluten-Free Good Health Cookbook: The Delicious Way to Strengthen Your ..."; Annalise G. Roberts, Claudia Pillow; 2009
* "Phytomedicine"; Immunomodulatory Properties of a Lemon-quince Preparation (Gencydo®) as an Indicator of Anti-allergic Potency; C. Gründemann, et al.; June 2011

Article reviewed by Knuckles Last updated on: Sep 2, 2011

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/531463-are-seaweed-alkaline-foods-anti-inflammatory/#ixzz1dFUMcJSN

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Would everybody stop talking about giving up the things they enjoy, please? I'm begging you.

You want wine, fine, coffee?? fine. Just be aware that they are acidic and you should eat something alkaline to counteract them is all.

Okay, so, there is no reason to completely avoid hardly anything except artificial sweeteners.

I said to stay away from peanuts that appear brown or not quite right as peanuts are a source of aflatoxin, which is one of the most toxic substances on earth, causes liver cancer along with mercury.

Brown rice--I got into trouble with brown rice because I was using too much of it and not balancing it with anything alkaline, precisely because at the time I had no idea of any of this.

Did I say elegiac acid is too acidic???? In the beginning I ate grapes on an empty stomach BECAUSE OF THE ELEGIAC ACID. Grapes are alkaline. GRAPES BECAUSE OF THEIR SUGAR AND ELLAGIC ACID FIGHT CANCER.

I wish we could get together to listen to one another and try to figure out the answers to all the questions at the same time so that there could be some basic understanding of what we are all trying to say. Like I said, no artificial sweeteners, other than that just be aware and try to do things in balance.

What if one looks at it like this.

Get a regular sheet of paper. Fold it in half both length wise and crosswise. You now have four sections. One of those sections should hold things that are acidic, the other three should be for alkaline foods. I would draw a line across the top of the acidic quarter leaving only a very small section for highly acidic foods if one must, but then draw a line sectioning off a larger portion of a section for highly alkaline foods and fill in that with three times more than the acid section.

Try to remember that it is what you are trying to accomplish that should be your guide in how you choose your food. A person with cancer should absolutely eat those foods that attack cancer, such as berries and fruits.

Your paper sectioned

ALKALINE--------- ALKALINE
ALKALINE --------- ACID

HIGHLY ALKALINE ------------------------- HIGHLY ACIDIC
========================================================

AN EXAMPLE MEAL OUT WITH FRIENDS--

1.ALKALINE / GUACAMOLE + SALSA --------------- 2. ACIDIC/ BEANS AND RICE-- 3.ALKALINE/LARGE SALAD (AN APPLE) ----4. ALKALINE/FILTERED WATER W/LEMON+GREEN TEA

THEN YOU WANT A DRINK-FINE WITH ME

HIGHLY ACIDIC/alcohol----

BALANCED BY HAVING----HIGHLY ALKALINE/wATERMELON

SO, you just went out to dinner at a Mexican restaurant, had fun, had a drink and stayed balanced.

That's really all I can say on this subject. It is actually beginning to stress me out.

I have faith that you will all see your way, understanding that it's not all or nothing, it's everything in balance.

Have coffee if you want, I do

For breakfast today I had coffee, which I balanced with a soup made of mushrooms, two stalks of ORGANIC celery, ground to smitherines in my little ninja, along with turmeric/pepper/olive oil, green onions and oats. The oats have a strong action against cancer and make the soup thicker as I grind them to a powder first. I took an astragalus because at this time it is pretty much all I am taking although I do occasionally take some chlorella, due to its chlorophyll content.

I love coffee. so, I have my soup too, feel as though I am fighting cancer, living stress free, and enjoying one of my true pleasures, a good strong cup of French ROAST Coffee.

Love you all,

Claudia

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

I don't think I have ever taken greater pleasure in my food. Plus, I generally feel so light and energetic that that improves my mood.

Deprivation is not my way; I'm more about exploring foods so that I can choose the ones I like and attempt to obtain an acid/alkaline balance by combining them. Claudia, your Mexican dinner example is perfect, and your suggested chart is a great idea. Enjoy your eating; and if we are all choosing many different fresh fruits and vegetables and making them the centerpiece of our diets, we are probably doing just fine.

Looking at these food charts has made me very creative, and I now cook more than ever. Fresh fruits and vegetables are so delicious, and kitchen items like Claudia's ninja chopper are an easy way to chop vegetables so they can be added to soups and stews.

Coffee is something I will not give up, and I just started having it with about a tablespoon of half and half. My blend is beautiful French Sumatra with just a smidgen of a lighter coffee. I have one big cup but would have another if I wanted. Pleasure is anticancer.

Love from me, too,

Jill

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Thank you. And may God bless your "Pleasure is anticancer." which I might adjust to pleasure is an anticancer diet and way of living.

Enjoy everything. Fear only diet soda and all things with artificial sweeteners.

culka's picture
culka
Posts: 158
Joined: Oct 2009

With every word.
For last few days I’m listening over and over again “Healing cancer world summit”. 10 hours of interesting information sometimes controversial . My head is not big enough for this.
For example: carrot juice. Most of these experts don’t recommended it for us due to its sugar content, but Ms. Gerson said if this juice is bad, all of their patient would died. Carrot and apple juice is a staple of gerson therapy, right? She is 90 years old, TBC survivor and she looks like 60.
One thing all of them said. GREENS. As much as possible. Soo now I’m sitting here, writing this (second time already) and drinking carrot/cucumber/kale/celery juice. Looks as it sounds, so green, but taste is not bad.
And by the way I had 3 coffee today, 2 normal route and 1 opposite way.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

duplicate post.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

Your last line had me laughing so hard that tears were running down my face. Nice to see you, my friend.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

Some of the best red light foods are served in red light districts. New Orleans, for example, has some of the world's best restaurants side by side with quasi-bordellos. More fun that way... two types of "forbidden fruits."

This post was supposed to follow Claudia's reference to Red Lights!

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Made me laugh so unexpectedly I spit on myself, again.

Love you my strange little Canadian friend.

Claudia

When I make carrot soup, I add the usual turmeric, etc, but then I add heaps o' nutmeg, which makes it taste like pumpkin pie. It is so delicious, I can't even say. Well, okay, guess I did.

Do your friends know how you roll when you are at home. 2/1?

JoAnnDK
Posts: 276
Joined: Jun 2011

Jill, I do not think these two kinds of diets are totally in sync.

I read that <<>>

But the anti-inflammatory diet does not call for these same restrictions. In fact, Dr. Weil's diet encourages the eating of Asian mushrooms and permits natural cheeses and whole grains, as do all the anti-inflammatory diets that I read about. One site (WebMD) said that the diet is close to the Mediterranean Diet.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 496
Joined: Dec 2009

You are correct about the two diets not being totally in sync; and I just reread my first post in this thread, which explains the difference as I was able to determine it. One thing I am certain of, however, is that increasing the alkaline foods in your diet will reduce inflammation throughout your body. I do not yet understand how grains can be both acidic and anticancer or how any cheese can have anticancer properties. Nevertheless, I do believe that the key is balance; and as Claudia pointed out, we can basically eat what we want within reason (and occasionally not) as long as we aim for either a decent ratio of alkaline/acid foods (recommended at 80 to 20)or of anticancer foods and "other."

Happy eating.

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

Jill, I think your diet is scrumptious. For me, you exemplify the best of all things - 98+% plant-based foods with a little of whatever you enjoy thrown in. My goal is to eat more like you - nutritious and yummy! Enjoy your birthday celebration.

Per the Food for Life Classes, which I will post the last 2 class info soon, there are DEFINITELY things we should avoid - animal products and processed foods. These are also highly acidic.

Re: the sugar in fruit - it's OK!!! It's the processed sugars that are bad.
Last night's class was about boosting the immune system. I will post later.

Mary Ann

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network