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Anti-Cancer Recipes?

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

I hope that some of you will be interested in sharing exactly how you follow an anti-cancer diet. For example, my breakfast often consists of a slice of spelt bread topped with warm olive oil, pepper, turmeric, and cucumber slices. My other main meals include recipes such as the following one for vegetable soup:

1. Saute two medium-sized onions in olive oil until they are translucent.

2. Cube yams, carrots, and turnips and add them to the onions. Cover with enough water to cook them.

3. When all of the root vegetables are cooked, puree a few cups of them and add back into the soup.

4. Add either freshly cooked or canned lima or navy beans and a can or two (depending on how much soup you're making) of organic tomatoes (Muir fire-roasted are great).

5. Chop a bunch of kale into thin strips and add to the soup. Cook until kale is wilted.

6. Season with pepper, turmeric, salt to taste (watch out for the salt; I use Mrs. Dash or salt-free hot sauce) and any fresh herbs you like.

I make enough to freeze and have this for lunch with a big green salad.

I'd be very interested to hear what others are eating.

Love,

Jill

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Remove the center ribs and stems from 1 bunch kale.

Tear the leaves into 3-to-4-inch pieces.

Toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1 teaspoon smoked paprika, and 1/4 teaspoon salt.

Spread on 2 baking sheets coated with a thin layer of olive oil.

Bake at 350 degrees F until browned around the edges and crisp, 12 to 15 minutes.

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1375
Joined: Mar 2010

Jill,

This is my area.... I love to learn more from others.

I start my day with green tea mixed with lemon juice and cinnamon, adding on my almond milk with my scoop of Whey protein and flax seed powder drink. Regular oatmeal with fresh ginger and cinnamon with some fresh fruit on the side.

To be honest, I do so much with vegies and fruits (do follow the "DIRTY DOZEN" list of vegies/fruits which should be "organic") and try different ways to marinade or saute. Also, add seafood (do follow the "SEAFOOD WATCH" list) and beans/lentils.

Green tea (Japanese Sencha) -- try to drink 4 cups per day. Try it on ice with lemon juice and Stevia for a sweet drink...yummie!

One receipe I love for snacking and breakfast --

~~GRANOLA~~

1 C chopped dates or raisins
1/2 C chopped walnuts
1 C wheat germ
1/2 C slivered almonds
2 C sugar-free shredded coconut
1 C sugar-free cranberries
8 C rolled oats
1 C frozen juice of choice
1/4 C Agave Nectar

Preheat oven 325. Mix all dry ingredients in bowel adding a mix of juice and Agave Nectar. Spread evenly on baking sheet and place in oven. Bake for approx 10 minutes and mix and continue until whole batch is a light brown. Allow to cool.

Recipe suggests at this point adding the fruit, but I find when fruit is left with the dry ingredients they get hard. What I do is add the fruit as I eat the dry mixture as this way doesn't get dry and hard. I place in a sealed container and eat this on fruit, oatmeal, ice cream (yep have to splurge) or just out of the bag.

NOTE: any type of fruit or nuts of choice work....go wild!

Anxious to hear more recipes.

Happy cooking ladies~
Jan

Susanna23
Posts: 66
Joined: Dec 2010

Ladies - thanks for these ideas! I have replaced regular potatoes with sweet potatoes for baking, chips, mash. Also bought a juicer last week and experimenting with various combos of carrot, celery, ginger, apple, grapefruit, blueberries
I do the powdered turmeric and black pepper combo but I grind it with an oil called Beauty Oil from Viridian - rather than olive oil - which is flax seed, avocado, pumpkin seed oil - supposedly a balanced mix of omega 3 and 6. I also eat picked turmeric which I get from the local Indian deli.
I also eat dried cranberries, cherries and cinammon with no fat Greek yoghurt at breakfast.
On another discussion, I am coming up to treatment 5 out of 6 of carbo/taxol for stage 1a uterine carcinosarcoma and I am not taking any supplements until I am four weeks out of my last treatment. So it is all about diet at the moment, though I am planning to start back on Vitamin D once I am clear of treatment.
I am definitely going to try some of Jill's recipes. By the way, I have been vegetarian for many years (I do eat fish and dairy) and we eat a lot of Quorn (I don't know where this is in the anti-cancer list but there is one small study showing it lowers cholesterol)
Take care
Susan x

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

I used to love Quorn and was surprised at the great taste. Would you mind telling me if the label indicates whether it contains soy? If it does not, I will look for it at the nearest health food store. One thing for me about being mostly vegetarian is that I always need to have either containers of frozen soup or other frozen veggie products for those nights when I don't feel like cooking.

Good luck with the rest of your treatment. I'd love to hear how your juicing is going. I toy with the idea of buying a juicer, but just thinking about the work involved makes me feel too lazy.

Jill

xoxo

HellieC
Posts: 420
Joined: Nov 2010

I think that Quorn is a mycoprotein, manufactured from a fungus (sounds weird when you realise how good it can taste)! I haven't read the labe, but I don't think it contains soy. I'll have a look next time I'm in the supermarket.
Kindest wishes
Helen

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Thank you for the information, Helen. I will check the ingredients as well. Quorn is delicious with a homemade tomato sauce and a bit of low-fat cheese.

HellieC
Posts: 420
Joined: Nov 2010

Was just talking to someone who said that they thought that some Quorn products contained egg and milk protein too - so not good for those who are following strictly "no animal products" diets! Must get to the supermarket and check it out! But today is cold, wet and very windy here in England so I think it will have to wait another day! Brrrrrrhhhh!

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Hi, Helen--

We are having the same kind of day here in NYC. I'm hoping that the rain is just feeding all those gorgeous flowers that should be blooming soon.

Thank you for the information about Quorn. I am not so strict about "no animal products" that I will completely give up milk. Eggs, however, are another story. By not eating eggs at all, and following a mostly vegetarian diet, I lowered my cholesterol 60 points. Of course, an egg now and then will not make a difference.

Let's keep sharing our ideas. I am about to look up a recipe for cold cucumber soup. Of course, that will likely include a dairy product--either yogurt or milk. I am going to trust that balance is what is most important. The copy of the alkaline diet that I have says to keep a 70 to 30 alkaline to acid ratio.

Best,

Jill

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 943
Joined: Nov 2009

Thanks, Ladies, for the recipes and tips! I surely could use them. I do try to sprinkle turmeric on vegetables.

I'm getting hungry!

Kathy

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Jan--

One of my out-of-town friends gives me homemade granola and peach-orange marmalade each Christmas. I go off my "diet" for a while and enjoy these delicious treats; then I go back to NOT having granola because I can't figure out how to eliminate all the sugar. THANK YOU so much for this recipe, which I will make soon and let you know. Do you know if Trader Joe's carries sugar-free shredded coconut?

If you have any great bean recipes, I'd love for you to share them. I add lentils to so many dishes; but now that the weather is getting warmer here in NYC, I'm not sure I'll be in the mood for pots of lentil soup. Someone gave me a recipe for a baked black bean casserole.

I'm getting hungry; I think I'll have some whole-grain hot cereal with cinnamon, mashed banana, and almond milk.

Thanks, again.

Jill

upsofloating's picture
upsofloating
Posts: 473
Joined: Dec 2009

As soon as the weather warms, I switch from lentil and bean soups to lentil and bean salads. A family fave is a simple lightly cooked nd cooled lentils with diced tomatoes, green onions, parsley and/or other fresh herbs, tossed with olive oil, lemon juice, sprinkle with turmeric and black pepper. Variations are endless. Also, black bean, corn, tomato, green pepper, avocado, cilantro tossed with olive oil, lime juice and perhaps a pinch of cayenne.
Thanks for all the other recipes!

Annie

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Hi, Annie--

Thank you for these warmer weather ideas. I think I'm going to try the second recipe and use it as a side or a filling for some bean tacos. I'm trying to work now, but all I can think about are these wonderful and healthy recipes.

How about cold cucumber soup?

Jill

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1375
Joined: Mar 2010

That peach-orange marmalade sounds yummie as well. I've purchased sugar-free coconut on line at www.iherb.com. They have a wonderful selection of foods, vitamins, facial products. I do so much comparison shopping at local stores such as Whole Foods and Trader Jo's but lower pricing for same products are found at iherb...try them. If you are interested in purchasing I'll give you a code which gives you $5 your first order.

Not much in recipes with lentils, which is an area I really need to work -- BEANS!!! I do have one for black bean soup if interested. This is my fav~

Keep those recipes coming ladies as I've gotten some grand ones from just this short posting trail.

Jan

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

It's not quite warm enough in NYC for cold soup, but I was wondering if I could find a mostly alkaline recipe for cucumber soup. This one, from Eating Well Magazine, fits the bill in so many ways. I wonder if apple cider vinegar could be substituted for the red wine vinegar? Both buttermilk and cucumbers are highly alkaline!

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/cold_cucumber_soup.html

Susanna23
Posts: 66
Joined: Dec 2010

The allergy advice on all my quorn products does say contains wheat, egg, milk - but I am not strict about these things. I suppose you'd have to say it's a very highly processed food - and you know what they say about processed foods.....anyway, am going to carry on enjoying Quorn because although I eat fish I don't eat meat so it's a good protein substitute for me.
Regarding the juicer, I timed myself the other day - to make the juice, wash up all the bits, dispose of the pulp and reassemble it for next time = 13 minutes! You have to clear up straight away or it's just too tedious to think about.
I am experimenting with my own recipes - mainly carrot, ginger, apple, cucumber, celery - today I added a bit of kale. All delicious. My husband who is very into healthy eating (and, fortunately, also very healthy) didn't fancy vegetable juice so I made us some pink grapefruit and blueberry juice the other day - lovely!
One recipe I adapted last week was beetroot tzatziki - blend two or three cooked beetroot with Greek yoghurt (0% fat if you like) cinammon, garlic. mint and chili flakes. Eat as dip with sweet potato chips and/or blue corn chips. Of course, tzatziki is traditionally a cucumber dish so there is that as well....
Gosh, this is a lot more fun than thinking/talking about chemo, Ca125, prognosis, scans etc....
All best wishes
Susan

RoseyR
Posts: 462
Joined: Feb 2011

Suzanna,

I have the same kind of uterine cancer that you do and with low hemoglobin, beetroot would be a great antidote.
But where in the world can I find it? Am in a major city on East Coast and have a hard tiime finding it even as a tincture or herbal tea.

Best,
Rosey R

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Hi, Rosey

I would look in international food stores. I'm in NYC, and there are a few such stores in Indian neighborhoods that sell all kinds of herbs in root form. Good luck.

Jill

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

I love seeing all of the new recipes. I am always trying to find more tasty vegetarian recipes.

You might be interested in this one as it full of good things...ginger, garlic, curry/turmeric:

Chickpea and Tomato Curry

1 tbsp. olive oil
1 medium chopped onion
3 cloves of garlic, minced
1 tbsp. minced fresh ginger
1 tbsp. curry powder
2 (15 oz) cans rinsed chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
2 (14.5 oz)cans of undrained regular fire roasted diced tomatoes (Muir glen)
1/2 c. chopped fresh cilantro or Italian Parsley
1 Tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp. coarse salt
Plain yogurt for garnish - optional

Heat oil in a Dutch oven on medium. Add onion, garlic, ginger and curry powder; cook 5 minutes or until the onions are softened. Stir in chickpeas and tomatoes. Heat to boiling. Reduce heat: simmer uncovered 15 minutes, stirring ocasionally. Stir in cilantro, lemon juice and salt.

Although there is turmeric in curry powder, I add some turmeric for good measure! I like to serve this with a side of couscous or quinoa.

This makes a large amount so you have lots of left overs.

Karen

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 943
Joined: Nov 2009

Hi. I have made this recipe a couple of times. It has a little kick to it from the jalapeno pepper. Its a great side or I even used it in a wrap, with scrambled eggs, etc.

Israeli Pepper Tomato Salad

6 medium tomatoes, seeded and chopped
1 each - med red, yellow nad green pepper - chopped
1 medium cucumber, seeded and chopped
1 medium carrot - chopped
3 green onions, thinly sliced
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and chopped
2 tablespoons each - minced fresh cilantro, parsley, dill and mint
1/4 cup lemon juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 garlic cloves - minced
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes, sweet peppers, cucumber, carrot, green onions, jalapeno and herbs. In a small bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredients. Pour over the tomato mixture; toss to coat evenly. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. Serve with a slotted spoon. Yields 9 servings. One serving (1 cup) 72 calories

I am always looking for recipes that gives you a lot of food for very little calories! There are so many different variations on this too.

I can't wait to try everyone's recipes! Thanks girls for all the good recipes.

Kathy

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Kathy, Karen, Susanna, and everyone who has shared a delicious recipe--Thank you, thank you. I am going to buy a juicer, make Israeli salad, and probably serve the curry to guests this weekend.

I LOVE this thread, and I love all of you.

Jill

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

I'm reposting this list because it contains so much valuable information. Thank you, Claudia.

http://www.cancure.org/cancer_fighting_foods.htm

Cancer Fighting Foods/Spices

The National Cancer Institute estimates that roughly one-third of all cancer deaths may be diet related. What you eat can hurt you, but it can also help you. Many of the common foods found in grocery stores or organic markets contain cancer-fighting properties, from the antioxidants that neutralize the damage caused by free radicals to the powerful phytochemicals that scientists are just beginning to explore. There isn't a single element in a particular food that does all the work: The best thing to do is eat a variety of foods.

The following foods have the ability to help stave off cancer and some can even help inhibit cancer cell growth or reduce tumor size.

Avocados are rich in glutathione, a powerful antioxidant that attacks free radicals in the body by blocking intestinal absorption of certain fats. They also supply even more potassium than bananas and are a strong source of beta-carotene. Scientists also believe that avocados may also be useful in treating viral hepatitis (a cause of liver cancer), as well as other sources of liver damage.

Broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower have a chemical component called indole-3-carbinol that can combat breast cancer by converting a cancer-promoting estrogen into a more protective variety.

Broccoli, especially sprouts, also have the phytochemical sulforaphane, a product of glucoraphanin - believed to aid in preventing some types of cancer, like colon and rectal cancer. Sulforaphane induces the production of certain enzymes that can deactivate free radicals and carcinogens. The enzymes have been shown to inhibit the growth of tumors in laboratory animals. However, be aware that the Agriculture Department studied 71 types of broccoli plants and found a 30-fold difference in the amounts of glucoraphanin. It appears that the more bitter the broccoli is, the more glucoraphanin it has. Broccoli sprouts have been developed under the trade name BroccoSprouts that have a consistent level of sulforaphane - as much as 20 times higher than the levels found in mature heads of broccoli.

Carrots contain a lot of beta carotene, which may help reduce a wide range of cancers including lung, mouth, throat, stomach, intestine, bladder, prostate and breast. Some research indicated beta carotene may actually cause cancer, but this has not proven that eating carrots, unless in very large quantities - 2 to 3 kilos a day, can cause cancer. In fact, a substance called falcarinol that is found in carrots has been found to reduce the risk of cancer, according to researchers at Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences (DIAS). Kirsten Brandt, head of the research department, explained that isolated cancer cells grow more slowly when exposed to falcarinol. This substance is a polyacethylen, however, so it is important not to cook the carrots.

Chili peppers and jalapenos contain a chemical, capsaicin, which may neutralize certain cancer-causing substances (nitrosamines) and may help prevent cancers such as stomach cancer.

Cruciferous vegetables - broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, and cabbage contain two antioxidants, lutein and zeaxanthin that may help decrease prostate and other cancers.

Figs apparently have a derivative of benzaldehyde. It has been reported that investigators at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research in Tokyo say benzaldehyde is highly effective at shrinking tumors, though I haven't seen this report. In addition, the U.S. Department of Agriculture says figs, which contain vitamins A and C, and calcium, magnesium and potassium, may curtail appetite and improve weight-loss efforts. Fig juice is also a potent bacteria killer in test-tube studies.

Flax contains lignans, which may have an antioxidant effect and block or suppress cancerous changes. Flax is also high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are thought to protect against colon cancer and heart disease. See Budwig diet for a specialized diet using flax seed oil and cottage cheese. For studies about flax seed and flax oil, go to our Important News or Archives Page.

Garlic has immune-enhancing allium compounds (dialyl sultides) that appear to increase the activity of immune cells that fight cancer and indirectly help break down cancer causing substances. These substances also help block carcinogens from entering cells and slow tumor development. Diallyl sulfide, a component of garlic oil, has also been shown to render carcinogens in the liver inactive. Studies have linked garlic — as well as onions, leeks, and chives — to lower risk of stomach and colon cancer. Dr. Lenore Arab, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the UNC-CH (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) schools of public health and medicine and colleagues analyzed a number of studies and reported their findings in the October 2000 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. According to the report, people who consume raw or cooked garlic regularly face about half the risk of stomach cancer and two-thirds the risk of colorectal cancer as people who eat little or none. Their studies didn't show garlic supplements had the same effect. It is believed garlic may help prevent stomach cancer because it has anti-bacterial effects against a bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, found in the stomach and known to promote cancer there.

Grapefruits, like oranges and other citrus fruits, contain monoterpenes, believed to help prevent cancer by sweeping carcinogens out of the body. Some studies show that grapefruit may inhibit the proliferation of breast-cancer cells in vitro. They also contains vitamin C, beta-carotene, and folic acid.Note I am a little conflicted about grapefruit as I have read not such stellar things about it elsewhere.

Grapes, red contain bioflavonoids, powerful antioxidants that work as cancer preventives. Grapes are also a rich source of resveratrol, which inhibits the enzymes that can stimulate cancer-cell growth and suppress immune response. They also contain ellagic acid, a compound that blocks enzymes that are necessary for cancer cells - this appears to help slow the growth of tumors.

Studies show that consumption of green and yellow leafy vegetables has been associated with lower levels of stomach cancer.
Kale has indoles, nitrogen compounds which may help stop the conversion of certain lesions to cancerous cells in estrogen-sensitive tissues. In addition, isothiocyanates, phytochemicals found in kale, are thought to suppress tumor growth and block cancer-causing substances from reaching their targets.

Licorice root has a chemical, glycyrrhizin, that blocks a component of testosterone and therefore may help prevent the growth of prostate cancer. However, excessive amounts can lead to elevated blood pressure.

Mushrooms - There are a number of mushrooms that appear to help the body fight cancer and build the immune system - Shiitake, maitake, reishi, Agaricus blazei Murill, and Coriolus Versicolor. These mushrooms contain polysaccharides, especially Lentinan, powerful compounds that help in building immunity. They are a source of Beta Glucan. They also have a protein called lectin, which attacks cancerous cells and prevents them from multiplying. They also contain Thioproline. These mushrooms can stimulate the production of interferon in the body.

Extracts from mushrooms have been successfully tested in recent years in Japan as an adjunct to chemotherapy. PSK is made from the Coriolus Versicolor. Maitake mushroom extract is PCM4.

Nuts contain the antioxidants quercetin and campferol that may suppress the growth of cancers. Brazil nut contains 80 micrograms of selenium, which is important for those with prostate cancer. (Note: Many people are allergic to the proteins in nuts, so if you have any symptoms such as itchy mouth, tight throat, wheezing, etc. after eating nuts, stop. Consider taking a selenium supplement instead or work with someone on how to eliminate this allergy.)

Oranges and lemons contain Iimonene which stimulates cancer-killing immune cells (lymphocytes, e.g.) that may also break down cancer-causing substances.

Papayas have vitamin C that works as an antioxidant and may also reduce absorption of cancer-causing nitrosamines from the soil or processed foods. Papaya contains folacin (also known as folic acid), which has been shown to minimize cervical dysplasia and certain cancers.

Raspberries contain many vitamins, minerals, plant compounds and antioxidants known as anthocyanins that may protect against cancer. According to a recent research study reported by Cancer Research 2001;61:6112-6119, rats fed diets of 5% to 10% black raspberries saw the number of esophageal tumors decrease by 43% to 62%. A diet containing 5% black raspberries was more effective than a diet containing 10% black raspberries. Research reported in the journal Nutrition and Cancer in May 2002 shows black raspberries may also thwart colon cancer. Black raspberries are rich in antioxidants, thought to have even more cancer-preventing properties than blueberries and strawberries.

Red wine, even without alcohol, has polyphenols that may protect against various types of cancer. Polyphenols are potent antioxidants, compounds that help neutralize disease-causing free radicals. Also, researchers at the University of North Carolina's medical school in Chapel Hill found the compound resveratrol, which is found in grape skins. It appears that resveratrol inhibits cell proliferation and can help prevent cancer. However, the findings didn't extend to heavy imbibers, so it should be used in moderation. In addition, alcohol can be toxic to the liver and to the nervous system, and many wines have sulfites, which may be harmful to your health. Note: some research indicates that alcohol is considered a class "A" carcinogen which can actually cause cancer - see http://www.jrussellshealth.com/alccanc.html. You should probably switch to non-alcoholic wines.

Rosemary may help increase the activity of detoxification enzymes. An extract of rosemary, termed carnosol, has inhibited the development of both breast and skin tumors in animals. We haven't found any studies done on humans. Rosemary can be used as a seasoning. It can also be consumed as a tea: Use 1 tsp. dried leaves per cup of hot water; steep for 15 minutes.

Seaweed and other sea vegetables contain beta-carotene, protein, vitamin B12, fiber, and chlorophyll, as well as chlorophylones - important fatty acids that may help in the fight against breast cancer. Many sea vegetables also have high concentrations of the minerals potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, and iodine.

Soy products like tofu contain several types of phytoestrogens — weak, nonsteroidal estrogens that could help prevent both breast and prostate cancer by blocking and suppressing cancerous changes. There are a number of isoflavones in soy products, but research has shown that genistein is the most potent inhibitor of the growth and spread of cancerous cells. It appears to lower breast-cancer risk by inhibiting the growth of epithelial cells and new blood vessels that tumors require to flourish and is being scrutinized as a potential anti-cancer drug. However, there are some precautions to consider when adding soy to your diet. Eating up to 4 or 5 ounces of tofu or other soy a day is probably ok, but research is being done to see if loading up on soy could cause hormone imbalances that stimulate cancer growth. As a precaution, women who have breast cancer or are at high risk should talk to their doctors before taking pure isoflavone powder and pills, extracted from soy.

Sweet potatoes contain many anticancer properties, including beta-carotene, which may protect DNA in the cell nucleus from cancer-causing chemicals outside the nuclear membrane.
A QUICK NOTE ABOUT THE TEAS, GREEN TEA IS A MORE ALKALINE TEA, THEREFORE IT WON'T GIVE YOUR CANCER CELLS AN ACIDIC JUICE TO THRIVE IN LIKE THE BLACK TEA.

Teas: Green Tea and Black tea contain certain antioxidants known as polyphenols (catechins) which appear to prevent cancer cells from dividing. Green tea is best, followed by our more common black tea (herbal teas do not show this benefit). According to a report in the July 2001 issue of the Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, these polyphenols that are abundant in green tea, red wine and olive oil, may protect against various types of cancer.

Dry green tea leaves, which are about 40% polyphenols by weight, may also reduce the risk of cancer of the stomach, lung, colon, rectum, liver and pancreas, study findings have suggested.

Tapioca is derived from the cassava plant. It is one of the many plants that manufactures cyanide by producing a chemical called linamarine which releases hydrogen cyanide when it is broken down by the linamarase enzyme. Spanish researches have been studying the cassava and attempting to clone the genes from the plant which are responsible for producing the hydrogen cyanide and then transfer it to a retrovirus. However, funding for the project has run out. http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_317000/317467.stm for more information on this. For a list of other foods that contain B17, go to our laetrile page.

Tomatoes contain lycopene, an antioxidant that attacks roaming oxygen molecules, known as free radicals, that are suspected of triggering cancer. It appears that the hotter the weather, the more lycopene tomatoes produce. They also have vitamin C, an antioxidant which can prevent cellular damage that leads to cancer. Watermelons, carrots, and red peppers also contain these substances, but in lesser quantities. It is concentrated by cooking tomatoes. Scientists in Israel have shown that lycopene can kill mouth cancer cells. An increased intake of lycopene has already been linked to a reduced risk of breast, prostate, pancreas and colorectal cancer. (Note: Recent studies indicate that for proper absorption, the body also needs some oil along with lycopene.)

Tumeric (curcuma longa), a member of the ginger family, is believed to have medicinal properties because it inhibits production of the inflammation-related enzyme cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), levels of which are abnormally high in certain inflammatory diseases and cancers, especially bowel and colon cancer. In fact, a pharmaceutical company Phytopharm in the UK hopes to introduce a natural product, P54, that contains certain volatile oils, which greatly increase the potency of the turmeric spice.

Turnips are said to contain glucose molaes which is a cancer fighting compound. I haven't confirmed this.

Consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with decreased risk of cancers of the colon and rectum.

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 943
Joined: Nov 2009

Thank's Jill for reposting Claudia's earlier post. It is a great source of information when preparing meals!

I hope you are having a fantastic day today! Still thinking SPRING!

Kathy

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

I may have been slow on the uptake, but I now crave all of the information that you have to share. I have either read or perused most of the books/articles/websites you have recommended and have returned to most of your diet-related postings. My philosophy is that if cancer grabbed hold, my body's environment was hospitable to it. Thus, if I don't change my body and mind through exercise, diet, PH balance, relaxation techniques, and pleasure, I might expect to see cancer again. If I DO change my mind/body, I am more in charge and can have much more HOPE that I have stopped cancer in its tracks.

Again, Claudia, thank you for all the information and encouragement you have shared. You have helped to change my life for the better. In addition, you have provided information that can save lives.

Kathy, I hope that the weather in PA in better than the gloominess we are currently having in Brooklyn, NY. Hope you are doing well.

Much love and good health to everyone.

Jill

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Hi, Karen--

I finally made the chickpea and tomato curry, and it was a huge hit! Although I made a giant pot of it, this delicious dish did not last long. I bought some curry, fresh ginger root, and fresh turmeric root at an Indian spice shop. I'm not sure if WHERE I bought the spices made a difference, but this is a dish I will make again and again. Thank you.

Jill

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Hi Jill....I like having a dish that provides several meals! I really do think that FRESH spices make a big difference. I am curious, did increase the amount of fresh spices? Usually for herbs they say use 3 times the amount of herb if it is fresh as the dried is more potent. I wondered if that applies to fresh turmeric root too? I just found that our Whole Foods has fresh turmeric root so want to get some and give that a try.

Keep cooking!

Karen

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Hi, Karen--

I'm not really good at following exact amounts of spices; I just add enough so that the dish tastes the way I like. For two cans of chick peas and one can of Muir organic fire-roasted tomatoes, I chopped one thumb sized root of ginger and the same amount of turmeric root and then used about two tablespoons of Indian curry powder. I also added a bit of dried turmeric because the fresh did not seem to be enough.

I forgot to mention that I added cubes of baked organic yam to the curry. This made the whole dish delicious.

I'd love some more of your recipes if you'd care to share them.

Regards,

Jill

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Jill....the addition of a cubed yam sounds delicious! I will add that change to my recipe!As recipes come to mind I will post....

One thing about this recipe....the house smells like an Indian spice shop for a day or two!

Karen

california_artist
Posts: 849
Joined: Jan 2009

hey, glad someone knows what I'm doing. Thanks Jill.

About the teas, after doing more research, i don't believe that black tea is anything you should have because it is associated with greater chances of getting breast cancer, whereas green tea protects against it.

We have come a long, long way on this board. The take charge attitude that is so--prevelant here, just make my heart sing.

more and more, cancer treatment is focusing on the simple yet effect things that you can do to put your cancer back in its place.

the more patients go further away from being patients and thinking on their own, out of the box, the larger the box will have to become if doctors want any of our 'business' in the future.

We are all expanding and challenging the limits of that suffocating, and sometimes deadly current box size. one size does not fit all.

love you,

claudia

A few things, one is that my brain is not as good as it once was and i tend to forget the why of things. I focus on the end result. What i mean is i know that i should do certain things, but can not always put my finger on why they are good. i have hundreds of articles on all the research i've done. unfortuneately, in the beginning I was not very careful in putting the name of the article on the printed out pages (most of my articles are three-hole punched and in binders that I still curl up with at night. i would be happy to send a disk to one of you and then maybe that person could pass it on to another, and so on. i have neither the funds nor the continutity of thought to keep track of that sort of thing, but I would happy to send a cd to the first person who asks. if someone wants me to send them a copy, and would be willing to send a copy to the next person or, post the articles on line here one or two at a time that would be the best thing. I can't put anything on the computer from the library.

The other thing is most important of all in my mind, and that is that you need to grasp that it is very likely that some of the things you did allowed that cancer to get a hold and set up shop. If you take that thought as a truism, then it gives YOU THE POWER TO DO WHAT you must to put your body back into a nonhospitable state for cancer. You can, and should be in charge. it's not your fault, but it or could be your responsibility to discover those things that might have contributed to your getting cancer in the first place. I tend to attribute a great deal of the incidence of cancer to very poor nutritional quality or our food, in addition to things like chlorine in our water and pesticieds on our food, hormones and antibiotics in the meats.

here's the bottom line. The closer you can get to what you would have been surrounded with, in this country in the early 1800's, the healtier you'll become. Sans all the people and animals that might be trying to eat you for breakfast or just kill you in general.
You know what I mean. organic foods, nothing added to the water, no industiral chemical in the air, natural cotton, no plastics anywhere, no preservatives.

i personally would love a little cabin in the woods where i could plant a garden and paint. Anybody have a spot for me??? I'm actually a lot of fun and a very good gardener.

and i'm not nearly as crazy as this particular comment makes me appear.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

It makes MY heart sing when you come here for a visit. I am sorry that you have had a bit of agoraphobia, but maybe your itchiness to get out today is a good sign. It led to a few new posts from you, so I'm smiling.

What you said about getting back to what our food might have been like in the 1800s is something that I am taking to heart. About 90 percent of the food I eat I cook myself from fresh and/or dried beans, grains, and vegetables. I have not used a microwave in years; I replaced all of my plastic containers with glass; and I buy mostly organic food from organic farmers that come to our area a few times a week.

Thank you, thank you for everything. You have had a huge impact on my feeling absolutely empowered.

Love,

Jill

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Kaleena
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Joined: Nov 2009

Claudia:

I am so glad you came out of your house to post! I am glad Jill asked about you because I was thinking about you. I love to read your posts.

If you ever find a cabin in the woods that is free from all the chemicals and stuff let me know! It sounds beautiful.

I get sick seeing many of the lovely streams in my area polluted. Although it is a lot better now than it used to be. At least they are now hard on companies that drain into the waterways. I live in an area where there are mines and mining processes. They also are trying to get people to allow them to drill for gas wells under your property. It is a big fight.

Oh, just heard on the news that talc can raise risk for cancer. Another one to add to the list.

Jill:

Thanks again for you keeping us informed. I really appreciate it.

Its another wet, dreary day here in Pennsylvania. I am water-logged! But the daffodils are starting to bloom, I see the tulips coming up. Its another great reason to smile. Is that a lilac tree I see in your picture?

I have been in one of my "bad hair day" mode. Must be the weather! Just got my hair cut, so now I feel better.

I hope everyone has a fantastic weekend.

Kathy

california_artist
Posts: 849
Joined: Jan 2009

Ah, by the time I logged in and got back here I plum forgot what i was going to say. So, ah??? have a wonderful day.

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

We just had a thunderstorm that caused my puppy (Ms. Trixie Delight--actually, she is eight and has grey on her muzzle, just like me) to shake in my arms. Poor thing.

Karen, that is a cherry tree in my profile photo; I think the blossoms should arrive in about a month. Our neighborhood is full of blooming forsythia bushes, magnolia trees, and all kinds of flowers. In a month or so, everyone realizes why this is Carroll GARDENS, Brooklyn.

Claudia, when you remember, I'm here...

RECIPE FOR COLD CUCUMBER SOUP

This soup has two highly alkaline ingredients: cucumbers and buttermilk. It's easy to make, and refreshing on a hot day.

INGREDIENTS
1 small clove garlic, crushed and peeled
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 cups peeled, seeded and chopped cucumbers (about 3 cucumbers), divided
1 1/2 cups buttermilk
1/4 cup fresh mint leaves, plus sprigs for garnish
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar (I'm going to substitute apple cider vinegar)
2 ice cubes
Freshly ground pepper to taste

1. Place garlic clove on a cutting board and sprinkle with salt. Mash with the side of a knife into a smooth paste. Transfer to a blender.

2. Reserving 1/2 cup of cucumbers for garnish, add the remaining cucumbers to the blender along with buttermilk, mint leaves, vinegar and ice cubes; blend until smooth. Taste and adjust seasonings with salt and pepper. Ladle into bowls and garnish with the reserved cucumbers and mint sprigs.

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kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Jill,

Thanks for sharing the cucumber soup....I have been looking for a good one! Can hardly wait for the farmer's markets to open. I long for FRESH LOCAL vegetables and berries!

Forsythia, Magnolias, Apple and red buds blooming here...and my lilacs are just opening! Oh how I love Spring and the beauty that surrounds us!

Hope everyone is having a wonderful day!

Karen

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Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

These are my favorite bushes/trees! When I am walking through my neighborhood, I always stop to smell the lilacs; and the smell sends me to a different dimension. Sometime in May, the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens has a lilac festival, with row after row of the bushes. There is also a cherry blossom festival, which is also gorgeous.

A small farmers market comes to my neighborhood on Sundays. We are now getting plenty of kale and swiss chard. Does anyone else find big salads of raw kale and other greens to be hard on their system? I eat so much fiber and raw foods in the course of my day that I sometimes need to stay close to home (if you know what I mean).

My wish for everyone here is that spring creates joy, optimism, and a healing of spirit. I hold you all in my heart.

Love,

Jill

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Kaleena
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I love all the fresh fruits and stuff and yes, it is sometimes hard on the system.

Thanks Jill for sharing that yummy cucumber soup! I hope your puppy is doing better. We are finally supposed to have sun tomorrow! The grass is getting so green now and the buds are all blooming. It just makes you smile. :]

Kathy

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Kathy--That was a comment to YOU about the cherry tree in my photo; I typed the wrong name. I'm glad that the flowers and green grass are making you smile. All of us could use more of those.

Thank you for asking about my dog. She is just fine today, although she has moments of pretending to be scared so that I give her extra treats. She and I both need some good walks, having gained a bit of weight during these cold months. Yes, it is possible to be an overweight vegetarian!

I hope you are doing well.

Jill

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kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Here is one you might like:

Sweet Potato Burritos

I freeze the extra's and then just heat up whenever I want one.

1 1/2 tsp. vegetable oil
1/2 onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 jalapeno pepper, minced
2 cans black beans, drained (or 1 can Great Northern and 1 can black ..can also use kidney beans)
1 c.corn, frozen, canned or cut off the cob fresh)
1/2 to 1 c. broth (or water)
1 1/2 Tbsp. chili powder
1 tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. turmeric (or more)
2 tsp. prepared mustard
1/4 tsp (or more if you like things hotter) red pepper flakes or use some cayenne pepper
1 1/2 tbsp. soy sauce
6 (10 inch) flour tortillas warmed
2 c. baked mashed sweet potatoes,mashed (2 small-medium potatoes)
4 oz. shredded Cheddar cheese

Directions:
1.Preheat oven to 350 degrees
2.Heat oil in medium skillet, and sauté onion, jalapeno pepper and garlic until soft.
3.Stir in beans and mash SLIGHTLY (don’t want them mushy). Gradually add broth (can add more broth or water if too thick), and warm.
4.Stir in chili powder, cumin, turmeric, mustard, pepper flakes and soy sauce.
5.Stir in the mashed sweet potatoes. Heat through.
6.Divide mixture evenly between the warm flour tortillas. Top with cheese. Fold up burrito style and place on a baking sheet.

Bake for 15 minutes in preheated oven, and serve with a dollop of yogurt or sour cream

Enjoy!
Karen

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
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Karen--I LOVE healthy Mexican food, and this recipe sounds delicious. Do you think the taste would suffer if I omitted the soy sauce? I try to stay away from all of that sodium, and I really don't care for the flavor. I even eat sushi with just the wasabi.

Yesterday, I made a big pot of quinoa, lentil, and vegetable stew. I cooked the quinoa and lentils while oven roasting some yams and onions covered in Hungarian paprika and olive oil. When both were cooked, I combined them in a pot on the stovetop, added Muir organic fire roasted tomatoes and some shredded Swiss chard, and topped it with lots of turmeric and freshly ground black pepper. I then cooked it for about 20 minutes, letting the flavors blend and the chard wilt. My company said the meal was delicious. This is something I make all of the time and will now be a staple of my diet along with the chick pea and tomato curry.

Have you ever tried a raw kale salad with lemon juice and parmesan cheese? The cheese is heavily acidic, but I think it's balanced out by the kale and lemon. This dish is fantastic and extremely high in fiber. Someone told me that kale is considered the broom of the system.

Thanks so much for another fantastic-sounding recipe. Keep them coming!

Jill

P.S. What do you think about swapping the flour tortillas for ones made of corn?

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Kaleena
Posts: 943
Joined: Nov 2009

Jill:

I just had some corn tortillas. Although they are probably better for you, the corn tortillas first of all don't roll. They crack apart. They are a little thicker. I would use them more for something you can break apart and maybe dip, but if you are using corn tortillas for rolling, it may not work. It may also be the brand too. I don't remember what brand we used. We could check that out.

By the way, your stew sounds delicious!

Kathy

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Karen--I LOVE healthy Mexican food, and this recipe sounds delicious. Do you think the taste would suffer if I omitted the soy sauce? I try to stay away from all of that sodium, and I really don't care for the flavor. I even eat sushi with just the wasabi.

Yesterday, I made a big pot of quinoa, lentil, and vegetable stew. I cooked the quinoa and lentils while oven roasting some yams and onions covered in Hungarian paprika and olive oil. When both were cooked, I combined them in a pot on the stovetop, added Muir organic fire roasted tomatoes and some shredded Swiss chard, and topped it with lots of turmeric and freshly ground black pepper. I then cooked it for about 20 minutes, letting the flavors blend and the chard wilt. My company said the meal was delicious. This is something I make all of the time and will now be a staple of my diet along with the chick pea and tomato curry.

Have you ever tried a raw kale salad with lemon juice and parmesan cheese? The cheese is heavily acidic, but I think it's balanced out by the kale and lemon. This dish is fantastic and extremely high in fiber. Someone told me that kale is considered the broom of the system.

Thanks so much for another fantastic-sounding recipe. Keep them coming!

Jill

P.S. What do you think about swapping the flour tortillas for ones made of corn?

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Jill, You can definitely leave out the soy sauce...there are so many good spices that it would not be noticed. Re: corn tortillas....that is a good suggestion but our regular stores don't carry corn ones larger than about 6 inches...not big enough to roll into a burrito. I am going to check the Mexican market.

Karen

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kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

This is one my husband and I like. I make it a lot in the summer.

Corn and Black Bean Salad

2 c. corn canned or frozen (if frozen, thaw and pat dry, if canned, drain and pat dry)- Can also use fresh corn cut off the cob (about 4 ears)
1 c. diced red bell pepper (about 1 large)
1/2 c. thinly sliced green onions
1/2 c. chopped fresh cilantro or Italian parsley
1 (15 oz) can black beans, rinsed and drained
1/4 c. red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sugar (I omit...sometimes I will put just a little agave nectar in, if I have any.)
2 teaspoons canola oil
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 tsp. Ground cumin
1/2 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
Dash of salt

Combine corn, bell pepper, onions, cilantro and beans in a medium bowl

Combine vinegar and remaining ingredients in a small bowl. Drizzle mixture over corn mixture: toss well. Cover and chill at least 30 minutes.

Yields 10 servings- ½ c. size

Calories 74, Fat 2.3g, Protein 3.4 g; Chol 0; Fiber 3.4 g; CHO 14.4g

(From Cooking Light)

Enjoy!
Karen

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 943
Joined: Nov 2009

Thanks Karen:

It sounds just like want I want right now! I believe I already have the ingredients so I will make it. Thanks for sharing.

Kathy

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 943
Joined: Nov 2009

Ok. I decided to make one of my recipes and I bought all of the ingredients. I made it and it came out really good. I ate some. Later that night I had a call on my answering machine from the food market where I bought the vegetables indicating that they had a recall on the cucumbers that I recently bought and I should either throw them away or return them to the store. They were being recalled for possible salmonella! I ended up throwing away the whole thing. But luckily I didn't get sick.

Tried to eat healthy and they take that away too! lol.

Kathy

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

Kathy--Unbelievable! Maybe the food gods were telling you that you are eating TOO healthy?

Can I ask you what recipe you made? I generally have cukes in the house all of the time, but I just went shopping and now have a fresh batch. I thought I would make a gazpacho, but I am open to anything.

Karen, your chickpea and tomato curry recipe has become a staple of my diet. I make plenty and freeze it. I've gone a bit off the diet, so tonight I made kasha with onions and whole wheat fusilli topped with vegetables. I feel better already.

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 943
Joined: Nov 2009

Jill

I made the pepper tomato salad and it was really good. I actually had all the ingredients this time. I also use this recipe and put in with fish, or with eggs.

I think I am going to try the chickpea and tomatoe curry.

What other recipes are good in hot weather? I am looking for something different to make. I am a little tired of chicken.

Kathy

Rewriter's picture
Rewriter
Posts: 493
Joined: Dec 2009

I eat little meals during the summer, almost all of them cold. Among my favorites are:

--homemade hummus, which can be used as a dip for fabulously alkaline cucumbers or as filling for a sandwich

--gazpacho, with cucumbers, peppers, tomatoes, red onions, cilantro, a little apple cider vinegar

--cold cucumber soup

--guacamole

--black bean, light cheddar, homemade salsa, and guacamole burrito in whole wheat tortilla

--raw chopped kale salad, dressed with lemon juice and Parmesan cheese

--cold black bean salads, with additions like red, green, and yellow peppers; corn; tomatoes; cilantro; mild chili peppers; dressed with lime juice and olive oil

Since I am mostly vegetarian, I also make salads with quinoa, lentils, and nuts.

Happy eating!

Jill

Kaleena's picture
Kaleena
Posts: 943
Joined: Nov 2009

It all sounds sooo good. I am definitely going to make them. Although, I am not the greatest cook.

Thanks, Jill, that should really get me on the right track! I'll let you know how my stuff turns out.

Kathy

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Jill, your meals sound so interesting, and of course healthy! What hours is your "cafe" open? Just sounds yummy... I would love to drop in!!

It will be a bit before we have local tomatoes and cucumbers, but may just have to settle for organic at Whole Foods....am needing some gazpacho and want to make your cucumber soup!

Thanks for sharing your ideas!! You inspire me to make meals in a more creative way.

Hugs, Karen

kkstef's picture
kkstef
Posts: 706
Joined: May 2008

Attached is a link to this salad which is very tasty especially now with all of the fresh asparagus! One of my favorites.

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/quinoa-salad-with-asparagus-dates-orange-10000001723399/

Enjoy!

Karen

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