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Alcohol after treatment is anybody still drinking?

scottied's picture
scottied
Posts: 37
Joined: Nov 2010

After I finished my treatment I asked my ENT was there anything I could do to prevent my cancer from coming back, He told me don't drink and don't smoke! Ive never smoked but I did like to drink occasionally. Ive noticed alot of people here say they continue to drink. He told me that smoking and drinking are the top two contributing factors to head and neck cancer and if it were him it just wouldn't be worth the risk. Im taking his advice because I would kick myself in the ass If i did drink and it came back (If it was from the drinking or not I would swear that's what caused it). I was just curious how many people here will continue to smoke or drink after going through this ordeal.

ps: I'm not judging anyone so please don't take it that way, I was just curious!

sweetblood22's picture
sweetblood22
Posts: 3230
Joined: Jan 2010

I was never really a big drinker, maybe a drink a month or so average. It really burns my tongue now. I tried a sip of wine and it about killed me. I can just about tolerate some bailey's Irish cream and milk with a bit of ice cream in it.

I get a Fanconi Anemia newsletter and in it was an article by an ENT that said to limit the one drink you may have a year to your birthday. I had four on my birthday.

I was told by my dentist that he doesn't even want me to use any mouth wash with alcohol in it.

I will probably have a drink on Christmas. As I said, I didnt drink a lot anyway, but I did like to have wine, or drink a drink at a social gathering. I will probably drink on the holidays. Maybe five times a year? I will definitely need a glass of coping juice for my relatives for Xmas dinner. IMO it's not worth the risk. I wouldn't drink every day, or every week, for that matter. That's just me tho, ymmv.

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8096
Joined: Sep 2009

I have an occasional beer.....my ENT didn't say not to, just to be sensible about it.

Also, as for the alcohol and tobacco reference concernng the top two contributors. I'd say yes to that in years past (at least as for tobacco), but now I would have to include HPV right in that mix. Actually, I've seen several references stating that HPV derived H&N cancer will over take tobacco derived H&N cancers within the next ten years or less.....

Best,
John

adventurebob's picture
adventurebob
Posts: 691
Joined: Jun 2010

A glass or two of red wine has been shown to be helpful. I'm referencing "Foods to Fight Cancer" by Dr. Beliveau who is/was the leading researcher on the impact of some foods on cancer. I tried a sip of my girlfriend's the other day and all I could taste was the alcohol and it did burn. I probably won't be trying any again until my mouth and throat are ready for it. Cheers!

Bob

MJ70
Posts: 65
Joined: Nov 2010

In reference to drinking...i do enjoy a couple handcrafted beers ie..ipa or ales....do not drink wine as they all taste like pure alcohol to me..depends on what you think caused your cancer..I think mine was a virus..(hpv) caused..Had a sore throat the two summers before i found out... that were so bad i could barely swallow..Had to take very strong antibodics to get rid of it.. but then who knows...I never thought i drank to much before.. Mel

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8096
Joined: Sep 2009

As in Dogfish Head 120 Minute IPA....;)

MJ70
Posts: 65
Joined: Nov 2010

IPA is short for Indian Pale Ale...in Oregon ...We have so many breweries in this state that make their own brand of handcrafted beers you would have trouble trying them all...After a day of a parched, dry mouth.at times... a couple beers make me at least think i have my salivary glands back...Wine taste like pure Alcohol...ugh...Never tried Dogfish Head.. Sounds like a fun one to taste...

rush1958's picture
rush1958
Posts: 197
Joined: Jul 2010

If drinking a glass of beer or wine a day has benefical effects, then I've calculated that I should live to be 7,342 years old based on my previous rate of consumption. That's plus or minus a couple of centuries......

My ENT told me that alcohol and tobacco were major bad guys in this form of cancer. She said they magnified each other's effects. She also told me that giving up those two vices would immediately start to improve my chances. I believe her! She hasn't steered me astray yet.

I chewed tobacco for twenty-five years and gave that up a number of years ago. I drank alcohol up until diagnosis, but quit when she said to stop. I haven't had any in close to a year and I don't miss it.

.....but that's just me, everyone is different....

luv4lacrosse's picture
luv4lacrosse
Posts: 1402
Joined: Jul 2010

My Doc's say the standard "abstinence is the best" but moderation and not abuse is the key. My ENT seems more concerned that I absolutely positively stay away from 2nd hand smoke.

I am 9 weeks post treatment today, and have not even had a dring since Aug. 4th, 2 days before my surgeries. I used to drink allot socially, I manage a heavy constuction type company and drinking at work related events is pretty prevalent, not to mention the entertainment of customers.With all of that, surprisingly I do not miss it at all. I tried a sip of wine a week ago, and man did it burn. That was unpleasant enough to keep away awhile longer.

MIKE

kingcole42005's picture
kingcole42005
Posts: 177
Joined: Oct 2010

Why would someone drink when they are specifically told not to by their doctor? It's like watching my father pickup a cigarette while watching him drown in his own fluids from COPD, or a heart patient eating a cube of butter. Isn't it similar to choosing not to have radiation or chemo, even though you know it could kill you? If you can't give up alcohol and it may cause you to have cancer again, maybe you have a problem and some kind of program will help. I don't know, this is just nuts to me.

pascotty's picture
pascotty
Posts: 164
Joined: Aug 2010

Here's my take on this whole deal. People are getting cancer that don't drink and don't smoke. I did both and still enjoy, yes enjoy the occassional ciggy, I don't smoke a pack a day anymore, maybe 2 or 3, even my doc says do what makes you feel good. I felt so miserable knowing that I couldn't smoke anymore and this contributed to my depression earlier on. I am now 8 months post treatment, my goal is to be smoke free by January, and I now believe I can do this from my OWN CHOICE not cancers choice, as for drinking I probably have one or two beers a week and really enjoy them. This is my choice and you have to choose for yourself, but, do it with no regrets, none of us know how long we have got, I am a florist that has to do flowers daily for people who were taken suddenly, without warning, they did not have to sit around pondering how long they have left, and I might add that a lot of these people were fit and healthy and did not abuse their bodies, and under the age of 45. Who knows what actually causes cancer, they say smoking and drinking, so what about the poor soles that have lead relatively healthy lives. I am 44 and had an old mans cancer, go figure..... I am truly responsible for what happens in my own life, and don't feel that any of us need the qualification of other people to help make our choices, be strong, make your decision and live with conviction that it is the right choice for you. My love to you all for a healthy Christmas and many many many many to come. Live your life. xxxxx

davidgskinner's picture
davidgskinner
Posts: 81
Joined: Dec 2009

While I think it would be dumb to overdo it, being paranoid about alcohol, etc. is unlikely to make much difference to most of us here. I don't drink at all anymore, but I don't drink because I chose not too long before cancer came into my life. Seriously, one or two drinks that YOU decide to have to enjoy yourself with friends once in a while probably will do more for your attitude (which matters a lot) than over-worrying about whether it is going to be the nail in your coffin. Live. Decide for yourself...and don't judge what someone else decides to do. All of us here are more acutely aware of death's proximity than the average person. So in my opinion we should cherish everything that is enjoyable in our lives.

kingcole42005's picture
kingcole42005
Posts: 177
Joined: Oct 2010

Sorry I can't help but judge when people smoke. I am the one with oral cancer yet I have to take care of my selfish father who refuses to quit smoking. There are other people to think about in your life, your spouse, your children etc. What gives us the right to expect them to take care of us when we did the damage to ourselves through smoking or drinking. I have a cousin that has permanent neropathy from over drinking and OUR taxes take care of her and she still drinks. My father is literally drowning in his own fluids from COPD, my kids, husband and I are taking care of him and he still smokes and WE also pay for him through our taxes. My mother died at 62 from smoking related causes and my grandmother died of lung cancer 30 years after she quit. Sometimes in life you have to choose others over your own selfish wants. We know cancer can be caused by smoking or drinking, how could you possibly risk putting yourself and more importantly your family through all of this again? Moderation has nothing to do with it, they cause cancer and other diseases period. I guess it's just priorities, what's most important to you. One last thing, as I was leaving the hospital after my surgery, my husband and I saw a guy smoking through a hole in his neck with fresh surgical tape still on it. I was repulsed beyond words.

alwaysforhim
Posts: 14
Joined: Jul 2010

King,
I was reading your comments, and I was wondering how do you feel when you see a morbid obese person eat? They are also putting their health in jeopardy. Please don't take me wrong, I understand your frustration, but we wouldn't understand unless we are there. Pretty much everything my spouse enjoyed before cancer has been taken from him. He was an active scuba diver, but due to energy, and lack of saliva he hasn't been able to do it for months. So if him enjoying a wine cooler once in awhile makes him happy, then let him enjoy it.

kingcole42005's picture
kingcole42005
Posts: 177
Joined: Oct 2010

The problem with obesity is we have to eat. I'm fat, but luckily I got cancer so now I'm losing it(according to many people). I've been called many names by complete strangers because of my weight. People are pretty evil sometimes. I have to eat, I don't have to drink or smoke. I used to drink in fact quite alot.I haven't for years and years, it holds no interest for me, especially now. Why take the risk? Is one wine cooler once in awhile worth it? Unfortunately alwaysforhim, I have to eat and I'm sorry if my being obese offends you because I have an opinion. I didn't take you wrong I read you loud and clear.

alwaysforhim
Posts: 14
Joined: Jul 2010

King, I am so sorry! In no way was my comments meant to be towards you. I sincerely apologize if it seemed to be. My statement was just trying to make a parallel, not a personal dig.

donna340
Posts: 72
Joined: Nov 2010

I agree with you kingcole42004. Smoking and drinking our just not in our cards.

Jimbo55's picture
Jimbo55
Posts: 572
Joined: Jun 2010

I was more or less a social drinker, but then I was a pretty social guy. Ditto what the Rush-man said: "My ENT told me that alcohol and tobacco were major bad guys in this form of cancer. She said they magnified each other's effects. She also told me that giving up those two vices would immediately start to improve my chances." After all we've been through to beat this thing, why risk it? And besides, my wife would never let me hear the end of it...Cheers

Jimbo

Irishgypsie's picture
Irishgypsie
Posts: 331
Joined: May 2010

I haven't chimed in for a while; I was pretty depressed and trying to get my life back! Hell I have even probably broke some records I started dating someone back in Nov. I'm 5 1/2 months out of treatment. I eat what i want anything from a sub, pizza, to chips and nachos. I even can put red hot on my eggs! Yeah I even celebrated with a few beers with friends. New England journal of Medicine article from July stated that HPV is the main cause; Tobacco a definite contributor. My doc said a few glasses of beer aren't going to hurt. Then I asked him about oral sex and he said I wouldn't risk it. I remember that survey someone started way back and I remember John Skiffin asking the taboo question what about number of oral sex partners????? Know one answered!!! That is the number one culprit. If you had oral sex with more than 5 partners in your lifetime your risk goes up 350%!!!! Truth is do they really know! I doubt it; they are just compiling research and they have to be a teetotaler and say don't drink, don't smoke, don't have oral sex. Hell we might as well live in a bubble! If the alcohol was the main culprit than there would be a hell of alot more people with oral cancer!!!

1. I dink less 1-2 beers on a Friday or Saturday! I don't BINGE like I use too!!
2. I try to eat more fruits and vegetables!
3. I take a black mans approach now and don't give oral sex!! (Why do you think HPV 16 cancer is rare in black men??)
4. reading the china study now. Switching to soy milk and more will follow but it's tough change of life!!!

sweetblood22's picture
sweetblood22
Posts: 3230
Joined: Jan 2010

Ok, am a tad confused because from what I have read Black men are at the highest risk for oral cancer. And I'm not sure how you can make that blanket statement about their sex lives, but ok. Also, just as there are safe ways to have intercourse, there are safe ways to have oral sex.

Irishgypsie's picture
Irishgypsie
Posts: 331
Joined: May 2010

African American men rarely have HPV+16 tumors. Most get cancer in there 5-6th decade like most of the folks on this board! I know that African American men have higher rates of oral cancer but there's is related to smoking and drinking (mainly smoking); I think on average most people who smoke drink, but that's just my opinion!

sweetblood22's picture
sweetblood22
Posts: 3230
Joined: Jan 2010

Yes, I read the paragraph, thanks. What I am wondering though is that the link between HPV and HNC has more recently just come to light. So if they weren't testing for that years back then how do we really know?

I don't claim to have all the answers, so don't get testy with me, please.

Irishgypsie's picture
Irishgypsie
Posts: 331
Joined: May 2010

I just was stating facts it's oral sex not alcohol in my opinion; didn't mean to offend! Bottom line is I don't think they have a full handle on it yet. However, I want to live my life. I want to be happy again. I was in a very dark place for a while and if I so chose to have a beer and the sky falls then so be it!! Cheers! Happy Holidays!!!

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8096
Joined: Sep 2009

I don't think they really have a handle on it as of yet. As you said, the relationship to H&N an HPV is coming on strong, but it's still relatively unknown and being explored a lot.

As far as I have found, there is not really a test that can be performed in males for HPV unless they are specifically going through something and it's already became active such as in H&N cancer.

JG

Irishgypsie's picture
Irishgypsie
Posts: 331
Joined: May 2010

I guess that's why I don't right much; sometimes these things get blown out of proportion; also I had stayed away from the board for a while and feeling pretty good; but today after looking at the board and participating it just gets too depressing. We are all in the same boat and it sucks! I was just trying to say I'm more worried about a HPV re-accurence than drinking. As a nurse and a cancer patient I know we aren't going to live forever; but if I only have 1,5,10, or 20years, etc. I want to live life; I don't want to sit home worrying about everything I do or don't put in my mouth. Happy Holidays! God Bless!

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8096
Joined: Sep 2009

Charles, it's all good discussion...you and everyone on here have their own personal feelings and thoughts. Sometimes we all get a little defensive and tend to overstate our feelings and thoughts.

I don't think anyone really means to step on anyone elses toes. In realitity, I think we all really want each other to survive. We just are so passionate about it, that sometimes we come across a little over bearing. I know that I do it at times, and when I read comments of others, it tends to PO me a little also. I guess that's just human nature.

The one thing that I do know..we are all in this together. It doesn't matter on how or why, we all have been infected and affected in some way. We are all here because we want to be, and we want to share and help others.

We want you and everyone of us to be here longer. To make the journey more tolerable and quality as best we can. It's all about giving, and giving back...we all do that just by participating.

Don't take anything to the point that you feel you can't express yourself....that's what we are all about.

Best to all, and Happy Holidays,
John

luv4lacrosse's picture
luv4lacrosse
Posts: 1402
Joined: Jul 2010

I agree with skiff. I find this post to be of more help to me than bad, but there are things on here that I would rather not read. The "lifestyle" issue is a hot topic, as we all ended up here probably from some form(s) of abuse. I have ZERO medical history in my family for cancer, but still got it. (I am the first one in my family for at least 5 generations that I know of.)
I have allot of cardiac history in my family, and never have had any type of heart related issue. I only had High BP and since cancer has caused me to lose 65 LBS, My Doc has taken me off of my BP meds. Go figure???

Anyway, I would take all of this in stride and just make your own choice. If I were a big smoker, I would probably quit or cut way back, I I were a huge drinker I would probably do the same. I do know that for me, going 100% Vegan is not for me, but trying to eat better in general is for me. I will change the way I drink going forward, but for me to never have a beer again is not realistic for me.

Let's not forget we all have one thing in common, and that is we are all cancer survivors, and we need to be there for one another even if the topic might sting a bit.

BEST!!!

Mike

mswijiknyc's picture
mswijiknyc
Posts: 421
Joined: Oct 2010

As I sit here in the ER with my husband, I read your post. He's been a drinker and a smoker most of his life. We both know this will not end well and beer is all he has left. I'm not going to take that away from him.

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 5868
Joined: Apr 2009

Wishing you the best with your husband tonight.

rozaroo
Posts: 667
Joined: Apr 2010

Before I was gifted with cancer I was fit, healthy & only drank on friday night's. I miss the occasional glass of wine. However, it now burn's but I do enjoy the taste of beer. My
Dr mentioned to go ahead as he know's I would not abuse it. I have also found alcohol free beer & wine that is enjoyable. I also refuse to preach or judge anyone as I am not living
their life & it is unfair to do so. In my opinion whatever work's for you is ok by me.

Joel4's picture
Joel4
Posts: 209
Joined: May 2010

I asked my Doctor and he said a beer once in a while is ok. I think I average about 2-3 a month. If more cancer is found down the road I will not blame the beer :)

skipper85's picture
skipper85
Posts: 231
Joined: Sep 2010

My husband only has maybe 6 mos - 1 yr at best. If he wants to smoke & drink I just let him. He can't enjoy his food anymore because his tastebuds are shot. He doesn't have strength to do the things he used to like to do. On the 6th he's going for another round of chemo so that will make him feel even worse. If he wants to drink his ass off and smoke (but not in the house) I just let him. Everyone needs something.

Skipper

Pam M's picture
Pam M
Posts: 2194
Joined: Nov 2009

I hadn't had a drink in over a year when I found out my treatment wasn't completely successful, and I'd need a neck dissection. Last year (before cancer was spotted), I asked for some Four Roses (KY Small Barrel) for my birthday - NO ONE got it. Right after my dx, my son went on a bourbon tour (yeah, I know, some states have a tour of their state parks, all right - ours has bourbon). I never indulged. When I learned about the need for surgery, I went into "poor me" mode, and ate a lot of the foods I'd been denying myself (garbage pizza with pepperoni and salami and sausage, sausage gravy, ham, bologna and, of course, SPAM to name several). So, you know, this mindless self indulgence fest had to end up with me, a day before the surgery, hitting my son's liquor cabinet. OW OW OW! I did get a few moments of "yum", but man, it burned. Surgery's done, so I'm off the sauce again. I might try some again at some point, but not anytime soon, and not in generous portions.

D Lewis's picture
D Lewis
Posts: 1540
Joined: Jan 2010

My Stanford doc told me my BOT SCC was derived from HPV. He saw no causative relationship between my cancer and either drinking or smoking. He stated that there was no reason why I couldn't have alcohol, albeit in extreme moderation.

That being said, all I ever drank before was beer and wine, in moderation, and typically with meals. At this point, the flavor of beer is slowly returning, and wine, unfortunately, still tastes like vinegar to me. A recent taste of hard liquor seriously burned my throat. Yikes! I simply don't feel motivated to consume alcohol. I have probably had fewer than ten beers since treatment ended about six months ago, and I haven't yet finished a whole one. Not an issue here.

Deb

ekdennie's picture
ekdennie
Posts: 231
Joined: Aug 2010

I would only drink for special events before diagnosis, I don't see that changing now. I had a couple of sips at a christmas party...it hurt, but everything hurt. I will have some bubbly for new year's. I don't see hard alcohol in my near future, but some wine will be there. my tumor didn't have any known risk factors...could happen to anyone, at any time, no matter your age. if I had a different type of cancer I would probably feel different about drinking, but what I know about my type I see no harm in it, every now and then anyway!

staceya's picture
staceya
Posts: 702
Joined: Jan 2010

I drink very rarely (3 or 4 drinks a year)
I had a part of a mojito in August and it was delicious.
I am planning on having some sparkly something or other on New Years.
My cancer was HPV and not related to the drinking I rarely do, or smoking which I never did.
I generally agree with the moderation approach, unless it is crafting, facebook or gummi bears, all of which I consistently overindulge in.

Stacey

Jimbo55's picture
Jimbo55
Posts: 572
Joined: Jun 2010

Deb's doc said her cancer was derived from HPV and saw no causative relationship between the cancer and either drinking or smoking. He stated that there was no reason why she couldn't have alcohol, albeit in extreme moderation. So my question is this: even though the cancer is HPV related, wouldn't smoking or drinking after treatment be a high risk activity? Personally I think if one wants to have the occasional glass of wine etc, go for it. Wouldn't smoking or drinking increase one's chances of having a recurrence of the cancer even if it was originally HPV related? Cheers

Jimbo

pascotty's picture
pascotty
Posts: 164
Joined: Aug 2010

This is the list I have derived from my research that we shouldn't do to avoid recurrance
no alcohol
no smoking
no preservatives
no meat
no dairy
no food colourings
no aerosols
no car fumes
no deisel fumes
no sunshine uv
no petro chemicals
no fruit and veg that is not organic
no sugar
no flour
no rice
no bread
i can't think of the rest right now but please..... They have us running scared on everything and I thnk that it is an unrealistic way to live once you have lived that way for soooo long. There is always going to be something that we shouldn't do or eat. Who really knows the answers. Definately not me but I chose to live and love the life that I have. We can't control our destiny but we can control how we enjoy it. Enjoy everyone and everything including the new you xxxxx

Jimbo55's picture
Jimbo55
Posts: 572
Joined: Jun 2010

I think you may be missing the point of my question which is: once someone has had H&N cancer, would one be susceptible to recurrence from drinking/smoking even though the original cause was HPV? Deb's doc seems to be saying the opposite, hence the question.

I am not advocating on one side or the other. I agree with you, we can't live life in a bubble. Cheers

Jimbo

pascotty's picture
pascotty
Posts: 164
Joined: Aug 2010

Sorry mate I wasn't directing that at you. I was just having a moment of frustration. The hardest thing is watching everyone around you doing and eating and drinking all these things without a care in the world. I enjoy the post and questions and love reading the responses. I don't know the answer to your question and I don't believe anyone else does. They are all calculated guesses. I have made dramatic changes to my diet and lifestyle. I'm glad I did. Then other times I miss my old lifestyle tastebuds and saliva. Cheers my friend. Jen xxxx

Jimbo55's picture
Jimbo55
Posts: 572
Joined: Jun 2010

No worries Jen, It's all good. Cheers

Jimbo

Jimbo55's picture
Jimbo55
Posts: 572
Joined: Jun 2010

I think you may be missing the point of my question which is: once someone has had H&N cancer, would one be susceptible to recurrence from drinking/smoking even though the original cause was HPV? Deb's doc seems to be saying the opposite, hence the question.

I am not advocating on one side or the other. I agree with you, we can't live life in a bubble. Cheers

Jimbo

Jimbo55's picture
Jimbo55
Posts: 572
Joined: Jun 2010

I think you may be missing the point of my question which is: once someone has had H&N cancer, would one be susceptible to recurrence from drinking/smoking even though the original cause was HPV? Deb's doc seems to be saying the opposite, hence the question.

I am not advocating on one side or the other. I agree with you, we can't live life in a bubble. Cheers

Jimbo

DrMary's picture
DrMary
Posts: 527
Joined: Nov 2010

So the original point of the question does not seem to be answered by current research. Since keeping track of HPV-caused H&N cancer patient's drinking would involve self-reporting, it is likely to be unreliable - most patient's whose doctors told them not to drink are not going to admit they are.

It would be interesting to check out HPV H&N recurrence rates in countries that traditionally drink and smoke more - we all know there are other issues (diet, especially) that would keep it from being a fair comparison, but it still might be interesting. Anyone want to take a quick trip to France and do some interviews?

I live for the day when Doug can taste wine again - it is one of the pleasures of life that I really hate to see him miss.

Dave B
Posts: 7
Joined: Nov 2010

Scottied, My onc said no smoking but drinking in moderation was OK. My bane is metastasized paraganglioma (carotid body). I've had a couple of palliative rad sessions to get rid of lower back pain. After the second one, my taste for alcohol evaporated. I used to have at least one beer after work every day. Now it's rare to have one a month. My new normal, I guess.

stevenl's picture
stevenl
Posts: 587
Joined: Jan 2010

Hi everyone,

This one is a tough one for me. I still drink beer, about 30 cans a week, and I am not ashamed of myself at all. My docs told me not to smoke any more and I don't. People can judge me all they want. When someone says they just can't understand why anyone would take the chance, well they don't know me do they.

Cancer has taken a lot from me. I am, was, a bricklayer but the sacrificed nerve to my right shoulder won't ever allow me to do that again. I can only thank God that I am a supervisor, but if I ever had to I wouldn't be able to lay brick. This is my livelihood we are talking about, the job I have done for the last 39 years. Cancer has taken my strength, but hopefully I will regain it. I am working hard on that. It has taken smoking away from me. I was a lifetime smoker, drinker. I am also on anti depressants and this really angers me. If I stop taking the damn things I quickly become very hard to get along with.

I am not drinking because of the things cancer has taken away from me, or because I am weak minded, it was just part of my life and I asked my docs about it. They said in moderation, but I probably drank 60 to75 cans a week before C. So what is moderation for me? I also smoked 2 1/2 to 3 packs a day. So when your opinion makes you form a conclusion about someone and their habits when you don't even know them, look out! You are judging that person.

Happy new year to everyone!!!
Steve

Shellysa's picture
Shellysa
Posts: 12
Joined: Aug 2010

I still drink wine daily....perhaps 2-3 glasses. I wasn't able to drink it during radiation due to the burning, etc. I used a straw for a couple of months after treatment to prevent the wine from touching the area burned by the radiation. My Dr. didn't tell me to quit...he said the combination of alcohol and smoking was a risk factor but alcohol alone wouldn't cause it....if it did, there would be a world-wide epidemic!

tonyanddenise's picture
tonyanddenise
Posts: 70
Joined: Jun 2010

I have tried all my old favorites, Crown on the rocks feels like acid eating my flesh, carbonated beverages even coca cola hurt bad. I love a good Cabernet or Merlot with a steak! Painful... sad yet true.
For the record my ent who did my R.N.D. said that the most common causes for H&N.Ca. were smoking and drinking for years. then later said (he has prostate Ca.) after we get through this we should meet for a couple of drinks ! moderation wont hurt me. I saw both of his partners in his practice, one conceded that the smoking had caused my Ca. the other said I simply drew the short straw. Go figure. I have not smoked since my diagnoses. My urge to drink is a lot like eating. sometimes I want something but it simply hurts more than the benefit from the desire.

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8096
Joined: Sep 2009

From a lot of what I have read, HPV+ will more than likely over take tobacco related H&N cancer within the next ten years or so....

JG

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