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Yoga and or resistance exercise during chemo

hopeful girl 1
Posts: 454
Joined: May 2010

Friends,

Is it ok to do yoga and or resistance exercise during chemo? I read an article or two stating in one study of groups divided by those that did not exercise, those that did aerobics, and those that did resistance during chemo-that the group doing resistance was most successful in completing chemo treatments.
It was thought that resistance exercise helps raise white counts.

Has anyone read any info on this?

I have one more chemo scheduled, and I have been dealing with low counts.
I am wondering if this could help me.

Peace and healing to all!

jmnye
Posts: 14
Joined: Feb 2010

I completed chemo for Stage IIIc mid-September. I did yoga throughout my treatment. Usually 2-3 times a week at the Wellness Community. I wanted to go daily, but could not afford to take classes. Yes, I tolerated chemo like a champ. Start yoga, go as many times as you can. I love it. It's a life saver!

Jane

daisy366's picture
daisy366
Posts: 1493
Joined: Mar 2009

I am reading an interesting book - Healing Spaces by an MD. It is very interesting to read that at least 30 min of moderate exercise, including yoga and Tai Chi, boost the immune system. The key is steady easy breathing. Vigorous exercise, on the other hand, boosts adrenalin which suppresses the immune system!!

I think back on my period of NED from March '09 to Feb'10 (when my CA 125 began to rise). Starting in October '09 I worked out vigorously before and during my adventure trip to Belize in February 2010. I wonder if I inadvertently suppressed my immune system and contributed to recurrence!!!

I am in treatment again (chemo and radiation) and I invite you to join me for moderate walking for at least 30 minutes a day. As Martha Stewart would say, "It's a good thing!"

Mary Ann

Always Hopeful
Posts: 234
Joined: May 2010

Thanks, Mary Ann for the info you provided from the book you are reading. Just last week I was concerned about the fact that I was not walking fast enough because I was not huffing and puffing, nor was I perspiring. I guess I was thinking more of the cardiovascular effects. I never even thought about the effect on the immune system. Are you aware if this been substantiated by more than just the doc who authored the book? Maybe I'll spend some time "googling" this.

How are you now tolerating your treatments? I believe I read in earlier postings that you were having problems. Hoping that has subsided.

Peace and hope, JJ

Always Hopeful
Posts: 234
Joined: May 2010

Thanks, Mary Ann for the info you provided from the book you are reading. Just last week I was concerned about the fact that I was not walking fast enough because I was not huffing and puffing, nor was I perspiring. I guess I was thinking more of the cardiovascular effects. I never even thought about the effect on the immune system. Are you aware if this been substantiated by more than just the doc who authored the book? Maybe I'll spend some time "googling" this.

How are you now tolerating your treatments? I believe I read in earlier postings that you were having problems. Hoping that has subsided.

Peace and hope, JJ

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I think much of this depends on where your were in "exercise mode" before starting treatments. Meaning, your base of working out was strong or not. I've always been a big workout gal and can tell you chemo pushed me down a few pegs. I was more into walking vs. my long runs....felt why push it. I learned to listen to my body as it was trying to heal from all the chemo toxins and radiation.

Gentle workouts from yoga and other similar levels of working out are excellent. If you can build up to walking, by all means, do it. Any type of workouts build our immune systems to keep us strong!!!

I can't say you can get a great answer from many docs. My oncologist knew I was working out, just told me to tone it down a bit so I'm not run down and then get sick. Not sure if some oncologists have a clue on exercise.

Bottom line, do what you feel is enough to work your body, but don't overdo. Not worth getting sick, as we're got enough to fight with cancer and treatments.

Happy exercising ladies!
Jan

Always Hopeful
Posts: 234
Joined: May 2010

Most of what I read confirms the moderate exercise to stimulate the immune system. The opposite was also confirmed, that more rigorous exercise breaks down the immune system. I also read that much of this depends on the level of activity a person perform on a regular bssis. Sooooooo, I guess all things in moderation is still the best policy.

Peace and hope, JJ

upsofloating's picture
upsofloating
Posts: 473
Joined: Dec 2009

Mary Ann
I have been aware, trying to suppress actually, a possible relationship between vigorous athletic endeavors and immune suppression that could lead to cancer as well as just the average 'garden' variety of illnesses - i.e. colds, flus, misc viral infections, etc.

Back in '92, I had been overachieving for 6 yrs, determined to earn my black belt in a demanding martial art, then within a month of achieving my goal I found my breast lump. Years later in a new relationship, keeping up with a new joint activity (adventurous trail running and biking), I developed this UPSC (relationship and activity had gone on for 3-4 yrs).

I have had a bad habit of burning the candle at both ends, till the flames meet in the middle - ouch!! In my mind of course, this is what it took to be fit and healthy. Time to quit living in denial and practice moderation in ALL areas of my life.

Thanks for bringing this up! Annie

Cecile Louise's picture
Cecile Louise
Posts: 135
Joined: Dec 2009

I'm a huge proponent of "Moderation in all things" - except this. I work out 4-5 times a week + strenuous yard work on most weekends - if I'm not sweating profusely and sore the next day, I don't feel that I'm really working out. I was an athlete in my younger days, but as an adult I didn't really start working out until about year after my last treatment...now I'm almost addicted to exercise.
I found this:
The ACSM guidelines for Gynecologic Cancer Survivors are: 30 mins moderate intensity aerobic 5x/week or 20 mins vigorous intensity 3x/week.

Love,
Cecile

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

I just viewed a presentation he had at MD Anderson. His take on exercise:

***** 30 minutes per day - 6 times per week *****

50% decrease in relapse (relates to breast cancer research but I hope it enters the uterine cancer side too)

The more intense, doesn't seem to be an issue...just moderate level he claims is best. So do what we can, and don't try to run marathons.

Enjoy,
Jan

hopeful girl 1
Posts: 454
Joined: May 2010

Jan,

That is great info!

Thank you!

Cindy

hopeful girl 1
Posts: 454
Joined: May 2010

Jan,

That is great info!

Thank you!

Cindy

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