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Have a Q about radiation treatment and swelling of tumor site.

JimsBrother's picture
JimsBrother
Posts: 107
Joined: Aug 2010

Hi all, in talking with my brother he mentioned that when the radiation treatments begin, the initial reaction of the tumer may be some swelling, that could become enough to close off the esophagus partially or even completely. I know at that point a G or J tube would be done for nusishment. We wondered about normal saliva production, the swallowing of it, and what would happen then. Would it just pool at the tumor in the event the esophagus was completely closed off? I'm sure keeping from swallowing it is probably the best at that point, but I just thought about swallowing and not even thinking about it. I'm sure I'm over analyzing the situation, but I can do that, he said I was allowed.

Considering the swelling is said to be very temporary, he is against a stent if at all possible. Knowing down the road that may be unavoidable, but the thoughts right now are for the immediate future.

I am familiar with the feeding tube, my sister in law had one for some time, but she had a different problem at the time.

Thanks in advance for your replies.

Rob

JimsBrother's picture
JimsBrother
Posts: 107
Joined: Aug 2010

Thank you very much Sherri.

His oncologist told him that the first couple treatments may cause swelling at the tumor site. He said if it does, it will be temporary and the tumor will then begin to shrink. He said it could last for the first 4 maybe 5 treatments. Since his tumor is blocking 2/3 of the esophagus, he said to be aware.

Is it common to give someone a J-tube when they begin chemo-rad treatments? Or is it strictly used when and if they have problems eating?

Tuesday he has his radiology planning appointment, and later in the day he has the ultrasound. I believe they are also going to biopsy the affected lymph nodes also. This week we should get some real answers and have a much better picture of where he stands right now.

As you know, the time period from test to results is the hardest of all times.

Thanks everyone for your patience these last few weeks. I am humbled by the generosity of everyone sharing intimate details of your lives. I have learned that everyone reacts differently to the treatments and predicting how this changes your lives is impossible. Taking it day by day and one step at a time is the only way to cope with something like this.

The stress everyone must contend with throughout the treatments, surgeries, medications, and emotional pain must be tremendous. I am impressed with the way you are all handling things. It is heartbreaking when I read the posts of people that are not successful in their battle.

I remember my dad and how he managed his life from diagnosis to the end. His strength and courage was unshakable. I never once heard him say "Why me" and he never lost his sense of humor and was never mean or nasty. He fought the good fight for a little over 2 years. They never gave him chemo or radiation and was never given the opportunity to do so until just a few months before he passed. That was in 1974-76. We didn't have the internet back then and information was just not provided by the doctors treating him.

Sorry, I got carried away there.

Anyway, thank you once again Sherri, you, Jim, and your family are in my prayers.

Rob

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