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Cancer free states/areas

HAWVET's picture
HAWVET
Posts: 318
Joined: Apr 2006

Thank you Skiffin16 for creating that map with our locations.

Has anyone else noticed the considerable lack of individuals posting from the Rocky Mountain states or the Great Plans area? The gap is very noticeable on John’s map.

I realize that these states are probably less populated, but it would appear that there should be a few cancer survivors in that area. I realize there is no scientific value, but it is interesting. The incidence rate must be low for people living in those states.

Hondo's picture
Hondo
Posts: 5608
Joined: Apr 2009

Good catch, something worth looking into

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8052
Joined: Sep 2009

Yes, there definitly seems to be a large gap in that area......

staceya's picture
staceya
Posts: 700
Joined: Jan 2010

well....we have a fair amount of cancer in my small part of MT, maybe we are just adverse to support groups....(I have recommended this one to all applicable persons and none have taken me up on it.)
Stacey

lady4darknight's picture
lady4darknight
Posts: 90
Joined: May 2010

Hi all, Can someone post or send me the link for the map so I could see it? Thank you.

Debbie

johnlax38's picture
johnlax38
Posts: 136
Joined: Aug 2010

Hi Deb,

This is the original thread: http://csn.cancer.org/node/194033

This is the link: http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Tampa,+Hillsborough,+Florida&oe=UTF8&msa=0&msid=108290908437938654290.0004899d469e1599afb49

Hope this helps

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8052
Joined: Sep 2009

Morning Stacey and Debbie,

You are both on the map...and like the post from Johnlax, that link should get you there....

Best,
John

delnative's picture
delnative
Posts: 452
Joined: Aug 2009

I live in slower lower Delaware, which has an alarmingly high cancer rate. Part of that is due to the fact that we smoke more than a lot of other folks, though it's been illegal here to smoke in restaurants, bars or other public settings for something like eight years.
However, my area also is a very popular place for retirees to move, given our low taxes.
Consequently, we have a lot of older people here being diagnosed with cancer, and the knee-jerk reaction is to blame something in the environment here.
The thing is, these are people who are in their 50s or 60s who've lived most of their lives elsewhere. If environment has a lot to do with cancer incidence, the fact that they spent 50 or 60 years somewhere else is far more relevant than the fact that they moved to Delaware and were diagnosed with cancer shortly thereafter.
Given our highly mobile culture, that's something to ponder.

--Jim in Delaware

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8052
Joined: Sep 2009

Good point Jim,

In this case though, with our little group. I beleve that most of us are in the 50 - 58 age range, and are or were still working, and a large majority are HPV+. I know there are some out lyers on both ends. I could be totally off also, I'm just going by memory from postings.

But who know's specifically why the map seems to be void in that large area.

Best,
John

johnlax38's picture
johnlax38
Posts: 136
Joined: Aug 2010

Ive heard of cancer "bands" where you see a trend in cancer depending on the industry and location. I have yet to see a map, again its just word of mouth. But looking at our map it seems to be east coast and mid Atlantic states where the main concentration takes place. In a way this makes sense, because this is where industry first started back in the 1800's, you know the "bad" chemicals no one was protected from and an vulnerable ecosystem. And then we see a gap in the west until we hit the west coast where the same type of growth occurred.

I don't know I'm not versed in this just a guess or a theory. I know in the Baltimore are there are a lot of steel manufactures and mesothelioma is huge here with asbestos exposure. So I think my theory makes sense, what a population is exposed too will have adverse effects on their health.

Skiffin16's picture
Skiffin16
Posts: 8052
Joined: Sep 2009

Good assumption for some types of cancer, not so sure concerning HPV derived cancers. Most or a large majority of us have/had HPV derived cancer. I don't think it's really been defined as the cause or what specifically triggers HPV derived cancers.

JG

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