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Strontium citrate & Osteoporosis

llight
Posts: 99
Joined: Feb 2010

As a follow-up to this previous thread Fosomax or other Meds / Osteoporosis, I’ve been researching alternatives to treating osteoporosis and came across strontium citrate, a natural substance (non-pharma, inexpensive). Are any of you taking it?

UC Davis apparently is doing a study on it and is supposed to have results by Jan. 2011. Here’s a National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) blog thread about it and the study.
http://www.inspire.com/groups/national-osteoporosis-foundation/discussion/update-on-strontium-citrate-clinical-trial/

Also, here’s an NOF abstract on a 2010 study (see “Poster 057”… scroll to end):
A comparison of changes in BMD in a bone health plan with two different versions of a bone health supplements.
“Conclusion: In both study groups [both incl. strontium citrate], following the bone-health plan led to increased BMDs [bone mass densities] compared to expected changes, between baseline & ending BMDs, and between compliant and partially compliant subjects--increases unaffected by volunteer bias or attrition. Modifying the nutritional composition of the bonehealth supplement led to greater increases in BMD. No adverse effects were reported in either group.”
http://clinicalosteoporosis.org/2010/files/abstracts/Socio-behavioral.pdf

Online consumer reviews seem to be favorable.

Google results for “strontium citrate”

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

A friend of mine tried Strontium Citrate but her bone density (dexa) showed no improvements. Plus she read about many having blood clots.....did you find this during research (didn't open all the links here...sorry)?

My doc wanted me to take Fosomax, but after doing research and reading about some fairly significant long-term side affects I said NO. Instead opting for more weight-bearing exercises and adding Vit D3 and calcium. I'll give this route a try and if not working after 1 year, then go to step B, whatever that might be.

Thanks for sharing,
Jan

llight
Posts: 99
Joined: Feb 2010

Hi Jan,

Just checking to make sure it was strontium citrate (nonpatentable) as opposed to strontium ranelate (the semi-synthetic, European brand Protelos) your friend took. Strontium ranelate has a low incidence of blood clots. The citrate has not been well researched since it is nonpatentable but, hopefully, UC Davis will learn more.

Did your friend take it for very long? I've read it takes 4 mos.+ to work.

In online consumer reviews, I've read possible rash or joint pain but no first-person accounts of blood clots with the citrate.

Thanks,
llight

jazzy1's picture
jazzy1
Posts: 1387
Joined: Mar 2010

Llight,

When I mentioned this to her she told me about blood clots....hum have to check once more.

Now that you've done all the research, does it look good for us to consume or still too much unknown research we're waiting for? Not a lot of research I'm finding with comes to alternative types. I used to rep for company in vitamins (powder form) and wow we could probably tell anyone anything and never had approval from FDA to contend with, so we looked good. You know heroin is "natural" and see what harm it does on our bodies?

Where would you suggest we purchase this product? Plse let me know what you end up doing, as my chiropractor mentioned some product to me, and can't find his note. Will ask him when in for my next appt.

After researching Fosomax, it generally helps with bone density but side affects are astounding -- jaw issues and many people having surgery some 5 years after starting the Rx. Not me....I'm running from the drug. Although, after my last oncol appt and I told him why wasn't taking, he told me about another drug....I told him no lets give the natural route a chance first. So what can he say then...nothing!!! These docs just don't have much information on natural type alternatives and give my doc credit he doesn't push.

Thanks and plse keep me posted as interested...
Jan

llight
Posts: 99
Joined: Feb 2010

[Thought I posted this before...]

Hi Jan,

I'll probably take it but it's a personal decision for everyone to make.

I recommend reading these two articles:
Strontium and osteoporosis: A treatment not offered to American women/DeHart
Strontium: Breakthrough Against Osteoporosis/Dean

As Dean says, “Strontium has been safely used as a medicinal substance for more than a hundred years.”

These reviews are pretty compelling, too:
Reviews-1
Reviews-2

I would probably get this brand based on the reviews and the fact that it contains only strontium citrate. Apparently, it needs to be taken, I *think* I read, fours hours apart from calcium supplements and on an empty stomach.

Lots more articles on this woman's blog, too, (scroll down)
For More Information About Strontium

Before taking it, I recommend reading all these links so one can form one's own opinion. It’s a naturally occurring salt (near calcium in the periodic table) so, for myself, I’m not seeing it as that risky.

Let me know what you decide.

bea-mil's picture
bea-mil
Posts: 106
Joined: Jun 2010

Hi,
As you know I always look for alternatives first. I found this product EZorb Calcium, but don't know what to think about it, never tried myself. Maybe some of you know more? Any suggestions?

Here is the website http://www.elixirindustry.com/ezorb/index.html

...and some info from this site:
"Physicians typically recommend prescription medications for osteoporosis treatment, including Fosamax, Actonel, and Evista, all notorious for countless side effects. These drugs are designed to increase bone density by retaining dead bone mass, by killing osteoclasts, the cells that are responsible for bone resorption. In those treated with these drugs, the limited space within the bones is taken up by dead or nearly dead bone cells, which prevents new cells from being created. As a result, bones become more fragile and more vulnerable to fracture.

It won't be a surprise to see some increase in density from bone scans performed on those treated with these drugs, who often have to be treated against the associated side effects. Of course all the useless dead cells are counted, which promotes a false sense of security that prevent the affected person from seeking alternative treatments until it's too late. Denser bones are not necessarily better bones.

On the other hand, having enough calcium supply is not the end of the story. Calcium doesn't become bones automatically. It has to be converted. EZorb Calcium increases bone density by stimulating osteoblast (bone-forming cells) activities and by promoting collagen production. As a result, new cells are created to replace the old ones, and the increased supply of collagen makes bones stronger and more flexible. Thousands of people with osteoporosis have reported significant bone density increase after taking EZorb only a few months."

llight
Posts: 99
Joined: Feb 2010

Hi Bea,

Apparently it's a proprietary blend made by Elixir Industries.

Andrew Weil doesn't recommend it. He said there has been no authoritative evidence or studies done on it. I couldn't find anything either. This is what he had to say:
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/QAA359907/A-New-Kind-of-Calcium.html

Thanks for sharing this. It's good to find out about everything.

llight

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