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Fullness & Bloating with a PEG

briana630
Posts: 2
Joined: Jun 2010

My father has a PEG. He doesn't want to have the formula feeding because he says he feels very bloated and full. Why does he feels full and bloated when we know he doesn't have anything in his stomach?

Greg53's picture
Greg53
Posts: 830
Joined: Apr 2010

Has your father just started using the PEG? I know when I first used the PEG I had similar feelings. Like I was full or bloated and had hardly taken anything in. For me I think it was just getting my stomach used to it. I had to start slow and do several small feedings a day. I increased the amount at each feeding and within a week I could do a pretty large amount each time. I was wanting to gain weight back and was working out so I was getting 3000+ calories a day, which is a lot of liquid, which I spread out over 5 feedings. If he's been on the PEG awhile, that's a different story and maybe someone else has a thought. If that's the case I'd definitely check with my doc to make sure nothing was wrong. Remember nutrition and keeping hydrated is essential to the recovery process, whether it's during treatments or after.

Good luck.
Greg

sweetblood22's picture
sweetblood22
Posts: 3230
Joined: Jan 2010

I was fine with shoving In or squirting in food really quickly thru treatment. But after rads I have no clue what happened but everytime I put in a can I got sick and nauseated and ended up vomiting. It got so bad I lost 40lbs cause I couldn't keep any formula down. Finally they got me a pump and in they made me set it at 55mls per hour. Three cans took forever but it worked and I didn't feel sick anymore. I still have my peg. Sixteen months now.

D Lewis's picture
D Lewis
Posts: 1545
Joined: Jan 2010

My scientist kid actually had to remind me about how small our stomachs actually are - about the size of a fist...

I had my PEG put in at 4 weeks, after I'd been off my feed for a while. I couldn't even take one 8-oz can of Jevity without being over-full. I asked for, and was prescribed the feeding pump, and set it at a slow rate. At the start, I would pump a single can in over a period of an hour. I would pump three cans at night, while I was sleeping, and set the pumping rate so that I would finish up seven hours later, right about the time my morning alarm went off. Worked great. During chemo weeks, I would pump more slowly, because I suspected it would reduce nausea. At the end of my treatments, I was able to pump a single can in, in less than half an hour. Then, on a camping trip about two weeks after end of treatment, I figured out that I was able to abandon the pump, and do bolus feedings with the syringe. Shortly after that, I was able to start eating soft foods. Took me about two more weeks to abandon use of the feeding tube all together. Soft foods, supplemented with Ensure, Boost, and other nutritional drinks are allowing me to hold a stable weight. So, dependence on the feeding tube during treatment does not necessarily mean that you will be stuck using it for weeks and months after treatment is done. Some of us bounce back very quickly.

Best of luck with the process.

Deb

D Lewis's picture
D Lewis
Posts: 1545
Joined: Jan 2010

About midway through my treatment, nasty acid reflux started up. The reflux really made my stomach feel uncomfortable and bloated. I'd get nauseated. Doc put me on Nexium. You know, the little purple pill. After treatment, the reflux stopped, so I haven't needed the pills any more.

deb

friend of Bill
Posts: 87
Joined: Mar 2010

Was receiving 2500 calories daily. Slowing down volumne and spreading out feedings definitely helped. Don't be afraid to experiment a little. Important that he feel comfortable. Good luck

Vince

Landranger25's picture
Landranger25
Posts: 208
Joined: Nov 2009

Although the PEG probably kept me going it was anything but ideal. I was given these huge syringes to inject the "food" through the PEG. I think the syringes were 200cc. All through the feedings if I put more than 200cc through the PEG I would feel it go up into my throat and it would gag me. I tried to do 12-15 "feedings" per day since I couldn't really take a whole can of the nutrition at once. I would also feel "full" with only a little of the nutrtion in. I also put in water to stay hydrated but was able to sip fluids as well. I know I wasn't getting the calories I needed and the nurses in the chemo center threatened to admit me as well as hook me up to a pump type machine to make sure I got what I needed but that didn't happen. It cost me 35 lbs. but I made it through to the end. I have 20 lbs. back 8 months out now. Have quit trying to gain weight and just try to eat better.

Mike

Kent Cass's picture
Kent Cass
Posts: 1747
Joined: Nov 2009

I had the huge syringes, but took the plunger part out and just poured the formula into the tube part when I attached to my PEG. I never injected/shot the formula into the PEG. Only thing I shot into the PEG was water, as I was told to do at least once/day.

Dietician said I needed four/day of the most concentrated Jevity, but I rarely got that much into me. Worst of times, I only did two cans, but most of the time did 3, and sometimes I added a bottle of Ensure. He HAS to get his Nutrition- insist upon it.

kcass

Pam M's picture
Pam M
Posts: 2194
Joined: Nov 2009

Briana,

I developed GERD symptoms during treatment (pain/nausea - feeling horribly full/bloated after just a few bites of food). Docs gave me a prescription, and it cleared. I was able to stop taking the meds later in treatment.

I also had to learn how to time my feedings. I never used a pump. I, too, did the feedings without pushing any syringe - I just let it drain by itself. When we tried "pushing" early on, it often made me uncomfortable and nauseated.

Hope you find an answer for your dad soon.

Pam M's picture
Pam M
Posts: 2194
Joined: Nov 2009

Briana,

I developed GERD symptoms during treatment (pain/nausea - feeling horribly full/bloated after just a few bites of food). Docs gave me a prescription, and it cleared. I was able to stop taking the meds later in treatment.

I also had to learn how to time my feedings. I never used a pump. I, too, did the feedings without pushing any syringe - I just let it drain by itself. When we tried "pushing" early on, it often made me uncomfortable and nauseated.

Hope you find an answer for your dad soon.

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