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Prostate CA and Vitamin D

ob66
Posts: 217
Joined: Apr 2010

Anyone involved with massive doses of Vitamin D (4000 to 5000 IUD) with blood levels monitored, in the prevention and treatment of prostate CA? I have seen articles indicating some success in PSA levels going down with same. Any input?

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Kongo
Posts: 1167
Joined: Mar 2010

I agree that there are several studies that suggest that Vitamin D and D3 may be effective in contolling or reducing PSA levels but am not aware of the studies that show that the massive doses you indicate have had a positive effect. Most of what I have read is that a "deficiency" of Vitamin D puts one at higher risk... for example people in Northern climates show a tendency to exhibit a more aggressive cancer when diagnosed in the spring (after a long winter without much sun) than those diagnosed in the fall.

We get most of our Vitamin D from sunshine and dairy products although I have read that the calcium additives in bovine milk can inhibit the ability of the body to break down additive Vitamin D into useful forms that can inhibit uncontrolled cell growth.

Can you provide more specifics about ther studies you read?

tarhoosier
Posts: 187
Joined: Aug 2006

Ob:
Yes, there is an epidemic of insufficiency of Vitamin D3. My first test showed 27 and my wife at 15. Lowest limit for health is 32. We spend a reasonable amount of time outdoors and live at 35 degrees N in a sunny climate. This insufficiency is common to find, now that doctors are looking for it. It is a contemporary "cause du jour". There is a simple blood test for D3 which can be done at any doctor office or even remotely by pricking a finger with a kit provided online and returning for a reading. I recommend the doctor route. I used 10,000-11,000 units per day for a year to finally tug my level up to 60-80. I had to try several supplements to determine one that was most active. My wife is using a prescription tablet of 50,000 iu, once per week. 4,000-5,000/day is not "massive" for me, in my opinion.
D3 is useful for all types of cell repair and health conditions in the body. It is a good idea to supplement D3, if necessary, for general health reasons, in addition to cancer. For men with small amounts of slow growing PCa, supplementation may show a slowing of psa growth. Other men may have the same benefit, however the psa effect may be masked by tumor size and aggression, other drugs and supplements, as well as the always important issue of "we do not know why".
Supplementation should be followed by doctor supervision as high levels can lead to hypercalcemia (stones). Ionized Calcium is the test to determine incipient stone formation.

steckley
Posts: 100
Joined: Aug 2009

I think Tarhoosier pretty well nails it. I take 5,000 IU per day to increase my D levels. You might find the following web site interesting ... it does have some links that relate cancer and Vitamin D levels.

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/.

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erisian
Posts: 109
Joined: Dec 2008

The vitamin D in my calcium with vitamin D is different from the D3 supplement I have, and there has been some recent studies with another form, which I believe is neither D or D3. So I'm starting to get confused. These dosages of 2000 to 5000 iu/day- what kind are you taking?

tarhoosier
Posts: 187
Joined: Aug 2006

The D3 that I supplement with is Cholecalciferol. This is the version necessary. D2 is called ergocalciferol and is a plant based version, without many of the advantages of D3. Calcitriol is a higher dose version used as a prescription dose. Not what we are discussing, at this point. Calcitriol has been used in studies with chemotherapy as an adjunct treatment.
I personally use Healthy Origins 3x2400 iu gelcaps from General Nutrition Centers (GNC). Any reliable source and any dose can be effective as long as doctor monitoring is maintained. My dose keeps me at 65-80 with reference range of 32-100.

steckley
Posts: 100
Joined: Aug 2009

I use a Vitamin D supplement I purchase at Vitamin Cottage (or whatever it is called now). "NOW - Highest Potency - Vitamin D-3 - 5,000 IU" Vitamin D3 as Cholecalciferol. 1250% Daily Value.

You might want to have your Vitamin D levels checked ... mine were running low so I added a supplement. I'm not advocating you use high dose Vitamin D and would recommend you talk to you doctor before you go above what the FDA (?) recommends as the maximum supplement ... I think it is 2,000 IU per day.

The Vitamin D coucil's web page will give you a bunch of information on testing, recommended levels, relations to cancer risks, etc.

CuriousCanuck
Posts: 3
Joined: Jan 2012

Do you think that your supplement of 5,000 IU per day (D3 presumably) has had any effect on your PSA or PSA velocity ?

We seem to have a way to measure PCa progress with PSA that's not possible with other tumor types. This could be useful information.

I had a blood test, my levels were low (Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy A: 65nmol/L, my lab says 75-150 nmol/L is normal) so I'm taking several thousand IU of D3 daily.

It would be nice to hear of other peoples' experience.

Trew
Posts: 892
Joined: Jan 2010

OB, I think you are on to something good here. I have not paid much attention for the need of vit D before but I am beginning to think this is far more important than I realized.

I am looking for more info on the produciton of D3- does it really come from processed sheep wool? And if so, canit cause an allergic reaction in those allergic to wool?

ob66
Posts: 217
Joined: Apr 2010

Trew, do not know about your allergy question. My physician who recommended consideration of this treatment did not seem concerned with allergies, but then I have not shown any to date. I will have blood tests quarterly to monitor the blood levels to make sure I am not over/under. I was referred to this procedure by a friend (non-CA friend) who has been doing this for years. His doctor (Dr. Prendergast in the Palo Alto, CA area---Stanford) recommended same for him as a preventative measure. Google Dr. Prendergast and Vitamin D for more info.

bdhilton
Posts: 759
Joined: Jan 2010

My doc and surgeon say 1000 IU of D3 and 400mg of natural E once a day is good pre and post surgery (of course along with some other foods…)…I do not know about the massive dose you are talking about would be safe and I would sure be under a doctor care talking those amounts,,

Best of luck

luckyman2's picture
luckyman2
Posts: 54
Joined: Sep 2009

Wow! I had not heard of vitamin D or vitamin D3 and using them to reduce the PSA level.

A note to all... please take bdhilton's advice: Even though one does not need a prescription for vitamins and supplements please be careful with the amount taken.

An extreme amount can result in damage to other organs such as the liver and/or kidneys.

At a minimum, it may just become expensive urine because of your body's inability to absorb such extreme amounts.

erisian's picture
erisian
Posts: 109
Joined: Dec 2008

I just found this reference:
http://www.ustoowichita.org/pdf/DIET AND SUPPLEMENT CONSIDERATIONS IN OUR FIGHT AGAINST PROSTATE CANCER.pdf
It states that D3 dosage in deficient men should be in the 5,000-10,000iu/day range until a normal blood level is reached, then 4,000iu/day for maintenance.

erisian's picture
erisian
Posts: 109
Joined: Dec 2008

"The Vitamin D Council". They might be biased, but...

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/cancerProstate.shtml

erisian's picture
erisian
Posts: 109
Joined: Dec 2008

Saw my oncologist today, and asked him about Vitamin D. He said that he was not aware of any studies which had demonstrated any conclusive benefit from Vit. D in the treatment of prostate cancer, and some that showed no benefit. He therefore couldn't recommend it as a treatment. But he also said that not having a Vit. D deficiency was important, especially for patients on ADT (hormone therapy), in order to help prevent osteoporosis. The toxicity is low, so overdosing is not an issue. I have seen 50,000iu D3 gelcaps (prescription). He said in deficient patients, it is common to use 50,000iu per week of D3, so the 2-5,000iu/day dosage seems reasonable, and the urine won't be very expensive because D3 is cheap as supplements go.

Then he stated that the role of Vit. D1, D2, D3, and other forms and analogues in cancer prevention and treatment is far from settled science, and that "if you put 20 Vitamin D experts in a room, you'd have a brawl."

The best advice seems to be to get plenty of sun, and supplement if you aren't white, living in Florida, and working outside.

erisian's picture
erisian
Posts: 109
Joined: Dec 2008

http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/content/full/27/13/2117

"Some oncologists may be comfortable endorsing a higher dose in all patients; a dose of 1,000 IU/d is often suggested. However, rather than endorsing an arbitrary higher dose, measurement of blood levels of 25-OHD is the most prudent approach to determine those who might benefit from vitamin D supplements, and to ensure that levels are in the advantageous range (90 to 100 nmol/L, or 36 to 40 ng/mL) in patients who are taking them."

tarhoosier
Posts: 187
Joined: Aug 2006

I say 60-80 ng/ml, or close to 100, with medical testing and supervision

barry2468
Posts: 9
Joined: Jan 2012

Only Vitamin D3 is useful to the human body (make sure it's D3). I have been taking Vitamin D3 for 3 years now (6000IU) and it has done nothing to my prostate levels. I take it mainly for my bone mets which is recommended (maybe not in such high levels though). Calcium not a problem so leave that go. Regular liver and kidney tests show everything as normal but I am taking a good liver supplement at the same time. Bone mets are stabilised. Barry

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