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Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymph Node Removal in Endometrial Cancer

lindaprocopio's picture
lindaprocopio
Posts: 2022
Joined: Oct 2008

New research out last month that I just saw today:

Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymph Node Removal in Endometrial Cancer
As Reported by HealthDay News. 2010 Feb 25

In women with endometrial cancer who are at medium to high risk for recurrence, removing both the pelvic lymph nodes and the para-aortic lymph nodes reduces mortality by 52% over that for women who have just the pelvic lymph nodes removed. Japanese researchers studied 671 women with endometrial cancer and specifically analyzed outcomes among 328 women at medium to high risk for recurrence. These women also received radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Treatment with chemotherapy alone reduced mortality by 41%, independent of the effect of lymph node removal on mortality. Combined lymph node removal did not improve survival among women at low recurrence risk. The study was conducted at the Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine in Sapporo, Japan. The researchers thus recommended removal of pelvic plus para-aortic lymph nodes in the treatment of patients with endometrial cancer who are identified as being at medium to high risk of recurrence. The study results were published in the February 24 online issue of The Lancet.

wonderingalice
Posts: 49
Joined: Feb 2010

Sigh. The para-aortic lymph nodes were lit up in my mom's pre-second-surgery CT scan; however, they did not remove them even then as they were too close to blood supply.

Northwoodsgirl
Posts: 201
Joined: Oct 2009

Thanks Linda for sharing. I had a couple para aortic lymph nodes removed and they were negative. I am happy that my surgeon did remove them even with the risk in terms of location next to aorta-steady hands required!

maggie_wilson's picture
maggie_wilson
Posts: 616
Joined: Nov 2009

thanx very much for citing that research, linda. i did have both para aortic and pelvic lymph nodes removed, plus chemo, so i'm glad to hear that increases mortality. i had thought that was fairly routine. how do you conduct your research in general, since you seem to have your finger on the pulse?
best wishes,
maggie

d_bellini
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2010

It seems like chemotherapy can really be the difference maker with many diseases outside cancer. According to the CDC, death rates related to tuberculosis in developing countries can be up to 50% without proper chemotherapy. Here is the story on the Center for Disease Control website: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00001729.htm

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