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My mom first ct scan due on december

kumar
Posts: 93
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi,

My mother ct scan is due soon.How they will do ct scan and how long it takes to perform.Please advise me.. i am very nervous.It is her 1 ct scan.

What is difference between ultrasound and ct scan.

gOD LUCK FOR ALL and god blesses my mom

Thanks Kumar

Northwoodsgirl
Posts: 201
Joined: Oct 2009

CAT scans take the idea of conventional X-ray imaging to a new level. Instead of finding the outline of bones and organs, a CAT scan machine forms a full three-dimensional computer model of a patient's insides. Doctors can even examine the body one narrow slice at a time to pinpoint specific areas of concern. CAT scans include having the patient lay flat on a narrow table which can be moved into the scanner. A contrast media may be injected into an IV line or there may be no contrast injection required. Contrast dye can make the patient feel warm in certain parts of the body for a brief period of time. The radiologist staff will explain everything they are doing prior to them doing it. If a patient is clausterphobic they can cover their eyes with a wash cloth. The CT machine doesn't make a lot of noise like an MRI machine.

Medical ultrasonography (sonography) is an ultrasound-based diagnostic imaging technique used to visualize muscles and internal organs, their size, structure and any pathological lesions, making them useful for scanning the organs. Obstetric sonography is commonly used during pregnancy. The technician will use a doppler device which is like a wand with a smooth end on it and move it across the skin in the area being imaged. It doesn't hurt.

Typical diagnostic sonography scanners operate in the frequency range of 2 to 13 megahertz. The choice of frequency is a trade-off between the image spatial resolution and the penetration depth into the patient, with lower frequencies giving less resolution and greater imaging depth.

california_artist's picture
california_artist
Posts: 860
Joined: Jan 2009

Call ahead and they'll have it on a cd if you ask for the cd and not just the report. The cd is usually ready withing 24-36 hours. Sometimes it doesn't have the doctor's final approval, but I always get it anyway, that way I have a chance to look it over and have my questions all ready. The report is off to the left and looks like an icon for a page. Just double click and you can read the initial report. You'll need to sign something saying who you are and why you want it. I always just say I'm the patient and I want it for my records. You must have a photo id to pick it up. When you get the thing home, you may be able to turn it around and zoom in and out. Use the wheel on the mouse. I can't remember off hand how to make it turn. Right click on things to see what you can come up with.
It's oodles of fun.

Good luck,

Claudia

Call the number where you had your scan done and tell the operator you would like a copy of a recent scan. They can connect you to the right department. Your doctor may not tell you how to get the scan. They might just not know or ..

Northwoodsgirl
Posts: 201
Joined: Oct 2009

Hi Patricia,
Something that may be of help is a Taber's Medical dictionary. I am an RN and in college a Taber's dictionary was what we used as a reference to learn what many of the medical and radiological terms mean. You can buy one at Barnes and Nobles or online. Also isn't it funny how a CD of a scan can cost $50 when it costs the hospital about $2 in raw materials and maybe $10 in labor. What a joke! I needed my pathology slides from Quest Labs and they made me sign something stating that I would get them back to them as they were their property. They haven't got them back yet and they are at the cancer center I selected.
Lori

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