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CT Scan clear but excessive pain

rpvyas
Posts: 3
Joined: Jun 2009

Hi All,

My Father got operated for tongue cancer which had spread to his lymph node. He underwent 6 cycles of chemotherapy(cisplatin was administered) and 33 days of radiation. He continously complains of excessive pain in the operated area and like lot of pressure being exerted on the jaw. he does sometimes have nasal regurgitation(like 5-10 drops comes out of nose in a class of 200 ml)

We did a CT scan and it doesn't show any abnormality except for a small fluid deposition.

He is going to have a examination done within few days.

Is this thing normal? why does it occur, has anyone experienced it.

I am really really worried. Please please help with your input or experiences.

Thanks,
Rahul

soccerfreaks's picture
soccerfreaks
Posts: 2801
Joined: Sep 2006

Let me say that this is not unusual. How's that for bailing out?

In my own experience (I had the same chemotherapy, the same radiation therapy, along with a previous surgery) the time following surgery and during the additional therapies can be very painful, indeed.

To begin with, radiation does not stop when the treatments stop. Please bear that in mind. The 'cooking' continues for quite some time following the last treatment.

Beyond that, your dad is likely to be experiencing somewhat severe dehydration if he is not drinking liquids sufficiently enough every day; his saliva glands may be completely nuked, to be honest, which aggravates the dehydration problem while making it harder, much harder, to swallow, to say nothing of eating; the phlegm/mucous thing is absolutely to be expected during this time and should be alleviated in time, although maybe not completely; radiation, in particular, can result in scar tissue that may be either temporary or permanent but which, in either case, may also lead to discomfort.

We tend to think that when treatment ends, effects end. But this is not the case, Rahal. The treatment, in effect, continues, and even when THAT is behind us, the effects last.

With respect to the jaw, I am not a professional, but it sounds as though dad is suffering from muscle scarring and/or deterioration as a result of the radiation. There are now physical therapists who devote their expertise and energies to helping those with such issues to work those muscles back into shape, to tear away that scar tissue, as much as they can. There is hope, therefore.

I wish your dad and his family the best.

Take care,

Joe

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