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Treatment Plan Set For Kickoff

WildGoose7's picture
WildGoose7
Posts: 34
Joined: Aug 2009

Friends

Sorry that I've been tardy, but my wife, Lori, had me doing the heavy lifting stuff trying to finalize the move-in process. I get pretty tired early on in this game.

I'll start radiation and chemo this coming Tuesday. I'll be getting Oxaliplatin and Flourouracil (5-FU) as the chemo. I have sighting targets on my chest, rib cage, etc, and look somewhat I'd probably appear on a combat range - forgive me, as I'm still a hunter and shooter.

Every doctor I've met in the past 6 weeks think that I'm a fighter. I know that I am and I'll lick this scourge! Cooking for my wife, she can't make hardboiled eggs, is another deal. I just have to smell it and enjoy, if I can, and then go back to my Ensure and ice cream.

Bless you all for giving me the moral support and sheer guts to push onward. My Our God contine to smile on you.

Mike "the Wild Goose"

Donna70's picture
Donna70
Posts: 920
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi Mike,
I go in on Tuesday and start my treatment too. Was diagnosed on 7/30 and had a lot of the same tests you did. Pardon me for not remembering, what stage are you? Mine is squamous T3N1M0, Stage III. I will be thinking and praying for you. I am getting Cisplatin and 5 FU as an inpatient. I have really big pink and green boxes on my upper chest both sides. Love that wild turkey on your photo. Good luck and God bless you too!!!
Donna70

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

Mike,
I wish you the best on your treatments as Donna70 said forgive me i forgot your age, but if my husband can do this at 45 i know you can, and he is a fighter too. Don't give up, you will lick this too just like my husband has, Just know your taste buds will change and what you normally eat won't taste the same once you start chemo, and do everything your doctor tells you if you get mouth sores let me know I can guide you remember I have beene through everything? While now you drink the ensure, later down the road it will taste awful!!! you can also have jello, puddings, oatmeal, scrambled eggs, mac and cheese, thats just a few things we did while having ours, i would just ask him on the week of chemo okay what do you feellike eating i too am not the best cook he does most of that but you learn as you go. Tell your wife she will learn me and her have something in common our names maybe she needs to come on and chat too. You know I am here for any questions, or help WE ARE NOW SURVIVORS OF ESOPHOGEAL CANCER!!!!!!!!!!!! didn't think I would ever be able to say that. Please know you are not the only one out there fighting this disaease we call CANCER.

You didnt mention but do you all have kids? just wondering. Are you still working? just asking so I can give you some insight on things, every bit helps.

I will be saying prayers and thinking of you even if I am working I still think of all my cancer friends daily.

Take Care

Lori aka MOE

ps Hope you have been keeping up on my post from beginning to end.

WildGoose7's picture
WildGoose7
Posts: 34
Joined: Aug 2009

First, I, too have squamous cell and am classed by my primary oncologist as T2N1Mx (x for unknown) based on my last PET/CT scan. My radiologist/oncologist classes it at T3N1M0. I'm just ready to get on with the gettin'on.

The photo of me and 'Old Notchtail' was from spring 2008. I had patterned this particular turkey for about 2 months but it was a big surprise when I got him. I was wearing shorts, tee shirt and sneakers just going up to a military facility to say good by to an old friend who was camping there.

I am under 4 months from my 60th birthday, and have 2 daughters and a son, who all live on Long Island. All from a prior marriage.

I spent my misguided youth on a 29 year continuous active duty career in the Coast Guard; 12 years enlisted and 17 years commissioned as an electronics engineering officer. I retired from that career in 1998 and worked as a mid-level engineering executive for a long distance company and as a field engineer for radio/antenna systems. My present employment with a native Alaskan company as a telecommunications engineer is on an indefinate medical hold. I specialize in certifications of secure communications systems on combat ships. I hold a current inspector's licensing credential from Navy Space and Warfare Systems Command to perform this level of work.

I am a permanently disabled Veteran, active in Disabled American Veterans, National Rifle Association, Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association.

I have had a number of friends/acquaintenances from all areas of the country contract different cancers - the only thing in common with all of us was our career path in the military; all of us have a number of years experience being exposed to high energy ionizing and electromagnetic radiation. The military reportedly knew of this in the early 1980's but it wasn't widely distributed until 1997.

I have a lenghty biological and engineering report that was tailored to me concerning this effect. It can be emailed to any interested party, but the recepient should have a highspeed connection as it is a 5.54MB .pdf.

I have worked in 14 foreign countries, lived in 3 of them, been 3/4 way around the world but never below the Equator nor north of the Arctic.

I have been married to Lori for the last 24 years. She remains on active duty with the Coast Guard and is stationed at the CG's global pay center in Topeka. We live in a log home in rural Kansas with our 2 dogs, Bailey Moondance, an English Labrador and Princess Blue Ridge, a Welsh Pembroke Corgi.

I am very greatful to all on this discussion board. You keep my 'fire' burning within.

Mike the 'Wild Goose'

Donna70's picture
Donna70
Posts: 920
Joined: Aug 2009

Hi Mike,
Thanks for the answers, it has been a struggle to find any squamous cell cancer people, most are adenocarcinomas of the junction area. You sure have led an interesting life, sorry it sounds like the military part has put you in harms way. Good luck and I will be praying for you and hoping we both get thru this first step,as Bill says, the first to fight the battle and hopefully we will win. Moe, I have already had some blowups with my patient husband, think it has been the jitters. Prayers and good wishes Mike!! take care,
Donna70

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

Donna70

Yes, your husband has the jitters along with the "what ifs" and he is scared. I was and he will be to for awhile. Please know I am here if you have anything to vent about, I walked the shoes. I wish you the best please keep us posted.

Moe (lori)
ps go back and read some of my posts so i don't repeat my self on things.

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

Donna70

Yes, your husband has the jitters along with the "what ifs" and he is scared. I was and he will be to for awhile. Please know I am here if you have anything to vent about, I walked the shoes. I wish you the best please keep us posted.

Moe (lori)
ps go back and read some of my posts so i don't repeat my self on things.

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

SORRY GUYS IT TOOK IT ALL THOSE TIMES

PLEASE FORGIVE ME.

MOE

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

Donna70

Yes, your husband has the jitters along with the "what ifs" and he is scared. I was and he will be to for awhile. Please know I am here if you have anything to vent about, I walked the shoes. I wish you the best please keep us posted.

Moe (lori)
ps go back and read some of my posts so i don't repeat my self on things.

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

Donna70

Yes, your husband has the jitters along with the "what ifs" and he is scared. I was and he will be to for awhile. Please know I am here if you have anything to vent about, I walked the shoes. I wish you the best please keep us posted.

Moe (lori)
ps go back and read some of my posts so i don't repeat my self on things.

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

Donna70

Yes, your husband has the jitters along with the "what ifs" and he is scared. I was and he will be to for awhile. Please know I am here if you have anything to vent about, I walked the shoes. I wish you the best please keep us posted.

Moe (lori)
ps go back and read some of my posts so i don't repeat my self on things.

WildGoose7's picture
WildGoose7
Posts: 34
Joined: Aug 2009

William

First of all, I want to thank you for your insight into this disease and for your inspriational messages. I read and digest each and every one.

Yes, I survived my first week of radiation and chemo. I have experienced neuropathy from the oxaliplatin due to cold contact. They weren't kidding about that! Just getting an Ensure out of the fridge is now a high speed process. When I go back today for another radiation treatment, I'm also going to get my 'new companion,' my 5FU pump checked to make sure it's operating properly. It's on a 7 day schedule. My radiation and chemo is for pre-op treatment.

When I first was told of my cancer, I went through the denial, remorse, regret emotions in a microsecond and I remain in the aggressive treatment mode. I recall my first words were, "Let's get going and kill this thing."

While I was waiting in the ICU (out-patient) for the portable x-ray after my "Power Pick" line was placed, one of the chaplains came through, recognized my name and face and visited for about 5 minutes. I had first met him on the day I was diagnosed. He remembered that I live on a large Corps of Engineers reservoir known for its crappie fishing. I just told him that we'd set a date next spring and I'd kidnap him for a day on the water. Now I have to get a boat!

The fact not withstanding, I'll probably not get to do any hunting this fall even though the generous citizens of Kansas have given me a free hunting and fishing license as a permanently disabled veteran. I conceptually could hunt about 50 yards out my back door in the direction of the uninhabitted areas. Don't know if I'll be strong enough for that, but I remain optomistic and hopeful. Maybe I'd even be able to eat that wild game by then!

When I returned from the hospital last Friday, there were 7 wild turkeys in my rock garden next to my back deck; they knew that my dogs were inside the house. As I write this, they are just across the road from the front of the house.

Concerning your friend with stage IV EC and Agent Orange, I would strongly urge them to speak with a Disabled American Veteran National Service Officer. Go to www.dav.org for the location, contact information and their insight into dioxin exposure.

My report was compiled by a couple of retired CG friends of mine with the same career path and have their own share of medical issues. One of them has been researching the then unknown or uninformed hazards of high energy ionizing radiation; alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray energy all uncontrolled and unshielded. My report was tailored specifically for me, but I know that they are preparing a new report with specific names removed. The report is over 50 pages and is in .pdf format. It is emailable at 5.54 Mb or I can burn it to a CD. It is footnoted and contains all scholarly citations and attributes. It is very high power LORAN-C specific.

Now, for your grandson. I must first say that bouy deck operations is exceedingly dangerous, so always be aware of conditions, surroundings and everything going on aroud you. Advancement; first don't make any hasty decisions. Speak with all sorts of people in different job fields to determine the pros and cons of each one. Don't ignore the officers as they all have their own different specialties. Keep your eye on post service/career marketability. Narrow down the list and select a job field or rate that is not stagnant, as some are notorious for that trait.

He should emulate a 'sponge' for knowledge and information. Don't just perform some task or function, but fully understand the rationale for it and the cost-benefit of it. Once in a job field, seek out new related opportunities and get as much cross-training in related disciplines as possible. Stay related both to the job and to the community outside. The Coast Guard can be a very closed society if one lets it.

Lastly, your grandson has joined a very old and proud organization rich in tradition. Keep one thought paramount: Reach Higher!

A full career in that organization is not for everyone, but it was the best single thing I've done with my life. It's arduous, physically and mentally hard and it does take a toll on some families. Maintain a semblance of balance and take time for yourself. Should he wish, he may contact me by email at mmcnaught@embarqmail.com.

Thanks you for the kind cajoling!

Mike
Meriden, Kansas

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

Good luck tomorrow to you and your wife, if at anytime your wife has any questions please feel free to ask. I know exactly what you are starting, its not a easy road but with us you will get through it. Kitten0385 is in the hospital again please read all her post, plus the one i posted. Know all of us will probably never meet but its the thoughts, prayers, and to vent that help.

Lori, keep your faith and positive attitude you will need it no matter how bad Mike gets, and trust when they have Chemo, they do and say stuff they never did before I don't know how long you all have been together but know if Mike does stuff he never has before its the Chemo not him, He will do and say all kinds of stuff he doesn't mean but know I am here if you need to vent or have any questions. Been there done that.

Mike, I wish you luck and please know I will be thinking of you

Lori aka Moe

mumphy's picture
mumphy
Posts: 486
Joined: Jun 2009

Hey,

I to have been subjet to the cranky chemos, It hurts your feelings at first but after awhile you do know that it's not them it's the chemo. I thought how would I feel if I had
poison running all over my body attacking me from the inside. I would be a real b&*())(

Being a caregiver is not easy, but I wouldn't want to be any place else but by his side.

God Bless & Keep all of you.
Extra prayers for Kitten

Kath

MOE58's picture
MOE58
Posts: 649
Joined: May 2009

Well you are so right pre kranky chemo, but all of you hang in there and kath said it right being a caregiver I wouldn't be anywhere but by their side. Its just a BUMP in the road as our beloved Kitten says.

Remember prayers is important.

Lori aka Moe

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