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Just found out last night

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

I found out last night I have PC. I am 54, never been sick,was a weight lifter,natural, no steroids, my PSA was 4.52. My biopsy showed one sample of twelve taken to be 25% involved. All the others were normal. Gleason is 3+3=6. Dr recommends robotics,I have Kaiser. They can send my for surgery in 5-6 weeks. All to fast. The mechanic in me wants it out, fix it and move on. My wife is my strength, after a life time together, she has no second thoughts, get it out. Me, I am reading everything I can. Just (scared) nervous.

ismetals's picture
ismetals
Posts: 70
Joined: Feb 2009

First of all good luck. You have a lot to learn before making a decision. This is a good place to start. There lots of other places also. One of them is no man stands alone. I had never heard of these sites before my surgery and it would have been great to have done more homework.

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

thank you for your response. I am glad to have found this site. It is reassuring to know of others going thru this also. Being able to read their expereances to all this.

JoeMac's picture
JoeMac
Posts: 77
Joined: Jun 2008

Aloha RRMCJIM,
Please, you have plenty of time to make your decision. Any treatment choice you make will change your life as you know it now.
If you can, please read my "Gleson 6 or less" article.
If you enjoy your current intimate life with your wife, take the time to visit all the sites and read & ask your doc many, many questions.
You do have a choice, do not rush into treatment, what is your PSA doing? steady, slow rise, fast rise. I did not have a choice, our sex life has changed, it is different and difficult for me to accept. I am working on it. Before treatment, I was 65, off road bicycling, farming, wood working, mechanic, hiking. I feel like I lost my last two years. Still not back on the bike, and doing very little farming.
Other sites are:
NCI - prostate
www.yananow.net
Please read it all, ask many questions, then If you still want it out, it is your choice.
Joe

Olee's picture
Olee
Posts: 97
Joined: Nov 2008

I am wishing you the best. I am 40 years old and just had robotic surgery three weeks ago this Thursday. I learned right away with PC, there is no set of rules that apply to every survivor. There is no right and wrong. Every man has a different situation which requires a decision based on his diagnosis and future outlook. Do lots of research, which at times will frustrate you and confuse you to no end, but you will benefit from it eventually. You can gather information from the internet,various physician consults, as well as fellow survivors. lean on family,friends and fellow survivors for support, you'll need it during your journey. I shed tears,pounded my fist, talked my friends ears off,read everything I could get my hands on and ask 1001 questions, it's perfectly normal. I'm dealing with side affects of the surgery, but I'm alive and looking forward to years more to share with my wife and kids, that's what's important. You hang in there and know we're here for you!

g8rb8's picture
g8rb8
Posts: 18
Joined: Dec 2008

What you're feeling is perfectly normal. I'm 45 and one month post-daVinci as of yesterday. I was originally diagnosed on Dec 18 and had the procedure on Feb 9. Spend time on this site reading stories and gathering info, there are a ton of other sites too: ustoo.org is one. Talk to your wife about your expectations and concerns. Be open with each other about what you expect and want after the procedure is over. You've spent a life together and you have a life left to go after the treatment, however you decide to proceed. Take a lot of time and ask specific questions of your doctor to get as much from them as you can about their experience and expectations/recommendations for you.

Being scared is perfectly normal. Talk to your friends and wife and be sure you're doing the best thing for your case. The time will move fast, gather information, make your decision and get comfortable with it.

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

I am glad everyone is here. My family all want me to opt for the surgery, no pressure, just concerned. Me, I feel like I am in a mourning stage right now. Very emotional, and angry (why me) etc...but having forums like this one is helping. Talking to others going thru what we will all be dealing with (and are). Thank you for your insight in this, all of you. I appreciate it more than I could express.

manybless
Posts: 6
Joined: Jan 2009

Good evening. First of all, don't forget to breath. Everything will happen faster than you may think. I am 42, diagnosed Nov 12th, PSA 3.8, Gleason 3+3. When I first heard that I had cancer the mechanic in me said to remove it as well. On Dec 8th I had the DaVinci robotic Surgery. I am fortunate as I do not have any continence issues and only wore the depends for 3 days. ED issues....I am not the same guy I was before but it still works! Cialis is a very good drug when I need to use it. Beyond those issues, life is good. Every treatment has side effects that go with it. Just spend some time listening and reading and you will know what the right decision is for you when you make it. Good luck and God bless!
Pastor Bobby

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

I do try, but still very emotional all the time. Never thought I would be such a cry baby, or so angry. I have another appt with my urologist on monday. I have so many question now that I have been doing research on this disease. I hope to get some answers in person, rather than by e-mail with my Dr. He is being patient with all my e-mail however. I think I found one of the good ones first time out of the gate. He still thinks I should go the Robotic method , but with only one sample out of twelve showing a 25% involvement 3+3 I am wondering if active survellance isn't an option worth considering. I just need more info before I can make an educated decision.

mkd51
Posts: 9
Joined: Mar 2009

I'm 51 and I was diagnosed on 1/23/09 after my biopsy 3 days earlier came back positive on 4 of the 12 samples. My doctor discussed the options with us and we felt that the best choice was the robotic procedure. My procedure was performed on 3/03/09 and I was released from the hospital the next day. Whatever pain or discomfort experienced from the surgery while at the hospital or for a few days after was handled with prescription pain medication. Any discomfort since, then it's Tylenol. Post op visit on 3/10 where the staples and catheter were removed. Only issue since has been with incontinence. Hopefully this is a temporary annoyance.

Olee's picture
Olee
Posts: 97
Joined: Nov 2008

Emotions are something that are going to come to the surface during this time my friend. The men on this site are human and if we thought we were above it, we sure got a kick of a reminder the day we were diagnosed with PC. I got all kinds of advice from family,friends etc when it came to emotions. It ranged from let it out,be optimistic,be positive, be strong, don't let it get to you, that shows weakness, to cry your eyes out if need be. Well guess what, I did them all. I'm a big guy who has always lifted weights, I played football,joined the US Army,hike alot,love motorcycles and with the stature and tattoos,don't look like a guy who might be that emotional. The day however that it was suspected that I had PC, I sat in my car thinking about my kids, my wife and all the things I still wanna see in this world, and I balled my eyes out right there on the spot. I've always been the leader in the family, not to mention the protector, now I was faced with a weakness and uncertainty. I cried many times since my diagnosis, out of nowhere, sometimes in my wife's arms , and sometimes completely alone. There have been many times also where I cursed and pounded my fist, even punching something close by(not human of course). The love I received though, from my wife and family, allowed me to feel peace and look to the future. Now that my surgery is complete, my emotions have evolved into renewed hope and happiness. Hang in there my friend, you're in company that understands.

kreinholt's picture
kreinholt
Posts: 35
Joined: Mar 2009

My De Vinci procedure went good and I am quickly recovering from the actual surgery. The drawback for me is that I had my catheter removed 5 days ago and am trying to do my kegals to improve and hopefully completely control my incontinence. It is definitely an annoyance and I am concerned with going back to work and not having it under control. I'm fine while I'm sitting down, but as soon as I stand up the pressure and leaking begins. I guess the fact that I can somewhat hold it until I reach the bathroom is a positive, however it is definitely limiting what I feel up to doing.

shipjim's picture
shipjim
Posts: 130
Joined: Apr 2006

I too know all the fear. My Dad had it in the 1960's before all the tests so when it was finally found due to it's growth it was all through him. I remember all the tubes and surgeries he had.
I was diagnosed at the same age as my Dad, 58. I was told on a Monday, by the following Tuesday had completed all my pre surgery tests and for SuperBowl 2006 I watched between bouts of the old golightly! 6am check in at the hospital, in my room by 10 done. Walking with my new best friend (catheter and bag) by 2 bored to death by 4 left next am at 8.
Wore the bag 10 days, things to know about the bags, the small one you strap to your leg won't hold 2 large ice teas if you take a nap, I used the zip off pants and hanged the big on inside and no one but me knew, first time I'd sat thru a whole movie in years.

10 days later the cath came out, I wore pads (depends)at first quickly went to panty liners gradually getting smaller now after 3.5 yrs, I wear liners as convience and protection against the random sneeze or what ever, drinking especially for me wine, makes one leak a bit.

I am impotent,with no erections (naybe 1/2 staff) the viagra etc don't seem to help, but can attain orgasm. Other than that, I'm FREE of CANCER, no wondering if it'll spread, no fear of future problems from it, it's GONE.

There are of course other options, regular surgeries, seeds, chemo, hormones etc but only one gets it out and Da Vinci is almost painless. Much easier than the gall bladder removal I had laproscopic on in the 1990's.

Goood luck on your decision and let us all know as you progress. jj

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

Thank you all for sharing your experiences. I have certainly realized that priorities in my life are not what they use to be. This disease has turned things upside for us. I never realized all the options that would be open to me. I will meet with my Dr on Monday and ask alot more questions. I am told that things don't have to move at a fast pace, that i have time to decided what is right for me. But in my heart I still believe that the only way to know it is gone, is to have it removed.

JoeMac's picture
JoeMac
Posts: 77
Joined: Jun 2008

Aloha RRMCJIM,
Your life has already changed with out your input. Now your choice to treat or not to treat will make more changes in your life. Ask questions, assess risks, what are you willing to take a chance on gaining/loosing. Take time to talk to someone from Behavioral Health Services. My wife and I waited way to long to seek help from BHS, almost a year after EBRT. Follow your PSA for a while. Mine rose from 8 to 14 in six months, I did not have a choice with all 12 cores 5 to 70% positive. If your PSA is steady, you can lead a normal life. If not steady, you have plenty of time to make the choice. Because we as a society are looking for prostate cancer, we are finding it in younger men. Most men die from other causes. Ask your doc if he knows of any man that has died with similar test results as yours.
Faith, Hope, & Love,
Joe

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

I have thought of that JoeMac. The studies I read of insignificant PC does bring up questions of their own. But I also have the family, my wife ,our 5 girls and grandkids. This effects all of us. So I do have a large support group . After my visit on Monday, We are off to the Islands for a brief respite from all this, hopefully to stop and think with some normalcy in my life. And yes, my life has changed without any input from me, and that really pisses me off. To think how hard we work in life , doing the best for our families, planning for retirement, getting close, making plans, only to get kicked in the balls when the object is at hand. So now I have to decide what is my best chances for making it to a natural end. Hopefully a long way off.

JoeMac's picture
JoeMac
Posts: 77
Joined: Jun 2008

Aloha RRMCJIM,
May I suggest reading the following;
http://www.vapcacoalition.org/Docs/ViewsFromTheOtherSide.pdf
I receved this input from a question I posted on a web site.
Sandy & I live on the Hamakua Coast on the Big Island.
Faith, Hope, & Love,
Joe

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

Thank joe, seems like reading and research is all I do when I get home from work. Took off 3 days for a pity party. Wife (Sheri) was there every step of the way. went to the Dr again today for more info. It felt more normal getting back to work after the party was over. I have always been a sort of work-a-holic. We have a friend stationed at Kaneohe, Hi who is after me to come spend a couple of weeks and clear my head. A little wind surfing, a little diving, and all will be right with the world, at least until I get back home. LOL

ismetals's picture
ismetals
Posts: 70
Joined: Feb 2009

I think you should go to Hi. Sounds like you got your head on straight. For me it's been 6 months post op. Feel great, incontenance has'nt been a problem. That's the biggest hurdle in my book. Sounds like you have taken care of you body and it should respond well. The ed part kind of sucks though. Viagra is starting to work though. You really have to keep your mind in the game. The VA is weird though. They told me to go in for a physical and then I got a bill. I'll Let you know how that works out.

whubbs
Posts: 77
Joined: Sep 2008

RRCMJIM,

I'm 4 months outside of my robotic prostatectomy and doing well!
A couple small issues (pardon the pun) but they are workable.

One of the most important things you can do for yourself moving forward, is understanding results, complications, benefits, etc. on each treatment, right from people who've been through it. This coupled with your doctors recommendations is a wealth of information and will insure you've made the right decision for yourself.

I'd be happy to share my experiences with you, take a peek at my thread: http://csn.cancer.org/node/163769
or feel free to email me at cobrabite427@yahoo.com, I'd be happy to answer any questions you have, including those 'hard to ask on a public forum' ones too.
I've been contacted by many men in the same boat, and I'm more than happy to help out in any way.

Good Luck! -Wayne

mkd51
Posts: 9
Joined: Mar 2009

RRCMJIM,

I took Wayne up on his public invitation to ask him questions and I can tell you that he was a big help!

Mark

ismetals's picture
ismetals
Posts: 70
Joined: Feb 2009

here's mine: ismetals@verizon.net Anyone with a sensitive question can contact me there

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

Thanks for the e-mail addys. I saved them for future use. I'm sure I am going to have more questions.Can't wait to see my phone bill with all the calls for info I have been making. But still no Divine intervention. This is one decision We have to make for our selves.

2ndBase's picture
2ndBase
Posts: 220
Joined: Mar 2004

I have survived 5+ years from a terminal dx with psa 24 and Gleason 9. I had one shot of Lupron and 40 rad treatments. I still have cancer as it was to late to kill it all and I may die form this sooner or later. You have a lot of years before your cancer has any chance to become a problem but it is hard not to do anything. However if you can get all the stress out of your life and only do things you enjoy, which is what I did, you may never have to have any treatment, seriously if I had your stats I would do nothing but keep an eye on it every 6 months to one year. The treatment choices all have a negative impact on your life and waiting will not hurt a thing. Think about it.

gkoper's picture
gkoper
Posts: 174
Joined: Apr 2009

Hi Wayne...My birthday suprise (last month) for my 65th was PC.
Its stage 1, contained with 4 of 12 samples affected. I'm seeing a doctor that a friend used for his Da vinci...his (the friends) results are good in all areas. I feel for the younger guys who have planned & saved for a retirement & chasing their dreams. I retired at 51 and have realized many of my dreams as a musician, sailor, athlete & grandfather. That said, there are still many explorations ahead. Of course my diagnosis blindsided me as my health has always been near perfect. My attitude since the bad news is a heightened urgency to live each day to the fullest...and be thankful&count my blessings. Enough of me.
Are you completely satisfied with your da vici surgery?
How has your quality of life changed since the procedure?
Is your sex life better, worse, same?
Incontinence problems?
How many weeks before you could resume normal day to day activities?
Where did you have your da vinci done & why did you choose the doctor and dA VINCI.

Thanks for your time & any suggestions,
George

whubbs
Posts: 77
Joined: Sep 2008

George,
Sorry to hear of your news, however you've come to the right place for opinions, experiences, etc. to help in your decision.
See my thread http://csn.cancer.org/node/163769 and my email address, I'd be happy to go over my recovery, problems, etc.
Regarding your questions though:

Are you completely satisfied with your da vici surgery? Yes. So far, PSA is indetectable at 4 months and other issues are fading very slowly, so I'd so thats a resounding yes.

How has your quality of life changed since the procedure? Not at all

Is your sex life better, worse, same? Better - Same or better. Need details- Email me.:)

Incontinence problems? Still some slight stres incontinence. Not a problem.

How many weeks before you could resume normal day to day activities? I tried going back to a desk job at 3 weks, physically I was OK, but my head wasnt there so I took another week.

Where did you have your da vinci done ...& why did you choose the doctor and dA VINCI.
Dr. Ash Tewari in NYC Presbyterian Hospital.
Because after exhaustive research, I found him and Dr. Patrick Walsh's practices to be the leaders in nerve sparing technigues of robotic prostatectomy in the United States.
After shaking his hand I knew he was the one to perform this surgery.
I ended up loosing my Urologist who diagnosed me, had to travel from CT to NYC for the surgery ( no big deal really) and potentially had to pay a cost of roughly 5 times that of my local surgeon at Yale. I didn't want any regrets.
If you are within a reasonable distance from NYC I strongly urge you to meet Dr. Tewari. He is amazing.
My only complaint of their practice, is that at 3 per day, 4 days per week, they seem to have too much on their plate for the size of their practice. I usually wait 1 1/2 hrs in a room before I actually see a doctor. It's been worth it though.
I'll be back there again next week for PSA check #2

Why Davinci? For me it was the only option. I needed to do what I could to preserve erectile function, oncological results and incontinence concerns.
Most if not all other treatments result in erectile dysfunction.
Radiation, whether pointed or seeds, kills nerves around the prostate = erectile dysfunction.
Freezing, cyberknife and others are experimental, I didnt want to be a guinee pig.
Robotic DaVinci is simply awesome in the right hands.
The machine negates hand tremors, and is magnified something like 5X, so a 5 inch hand move is 1 inch at the tool.
This is truly neurosurgery and should be qualified as such.
A highly skilled surgeon can remove the prostate with minimal nerve damage. The skillset is the big part.
Tewari has gone as far as pioneering a catherless option if deemed possible during the early parts of the surgery.

Anyway.
Good luck and be sure to email me or I'd be happy to talk if you make the call :)
-Wayne

gkoper's picture
gkoper
Posts: 174
Joined: Apr 2009

Thanks for the comeback Wayne...I have decided on the Da Vinci mostly based on a friends success with the surgeon I chose. He has done over 125 precedures so he has a experienced hand. Watched a webcast of the procedure and was the knot tying done with the robot. 6 weeks till my surgery and I'm trying to do all I can physically since I will be shut down for 2-3 weeks. Hope all is going well with you.
Regards,
George

Tefagh
Posts: 3
Joined: May 2009

My dad is going through exactely every thing you described.
He wasn't sure if he wanted to have prostectomy till last night that we found out his PSA is rising up.
Check your PSA regularly while you are searching and thinking.
Be positive, the last thing you want is losing time, so as long as you know your PSA is steady you have enough time to think about optionts of treatment.
After my reasearch about side effects, I found out that if you go for davinci prostectomy rather than open surgery the side effects are much less from 80% to 20%. the other point is you need to find a surgeon who has done this davinci robaric surgery in a large number rather than just few. This point also reduces the risks of side effects to a very low percentage.
I am extremely worried about my dad and my advise is think about being around your family longer which is the main point.
Hope it helped.
Goodluck

Tefagh
Posts: 3
Joined: May 2009

My dad is going through exactely every thing you described.
He wasn't sure if he wanted to have prostectomy till last night that we found out his PSA is rising up.
Check your PSA regularly while you are searching and thinking.
Be positive, the last thing you want is losing time, so as long as you know your PSA is steady you have enough time to think about optionts of treatment.
After my reasearch about side effects, I found out that if you go for davinci prostectomy rather than open surgery the side effects are much less from 80% to 20%. the other point is you need to find a surgeon who has done this davinci robaric surgery in a large number rather than just few. This point also reduces the risks of side effects to a very low percentage.
I am extremely worried about my dad and my advise is think about being around your family longer which is the main point.
Hope it helped.
Goodluck

tonybear
Posts: 92
Joined: Mar 2009

my wife has been my main support. talk to your wife about it all, she will be your main help and caregiver. i thought i had a good wife, i now realize i have a God given blessing of a great wife. i had brachy therapy followed by some tomo raditaion. no side effects have shown up in 6 months. the plumbing is working great. but by all means follow a good doctors advice and listen to your wife. she knows you better than you think.

sl1438
Posts: 2
Joined: Apr 2009

Like so many of you, we were devastated to get a diagnosis of Prostate Cancer (no symptoms prior). We quickly found out that you have to become knowledgeable overnight - and it seems everyone is telling you something different. My fiance just 'wanted it out'! So, we saw a surgeon first, who he was more than willing to schedule surgery with...but I wanted to explore ALL the options first. Okay, this is what we found out: the surgeon at Emory wanted to do a radical prostatectomy although he mentioned 'robot assisted' there was still a large incision and long recovery. We went to the "Prostate Center" who was always sending out brochures which 'sounded good'...they ALWAYS do the seeds then you are followed every day for weeks on end, with radiation. We saw the radiologist at Emory who wanted to start (that day) with Hormones, then a course of radiation. We then went to Duke University who has a Team of doctors who meet with you - each from different areas of expertise (surgery, radiation, and medication)- they each go over your case, then confer with each other in a conference room, and present their recommendation. All in one day. The way it should be done. Although they have two DaVinci Robotic machines at Duke, we were able to find Dr. Scott Miller in Atlanta who pioneered this procedure in Georgia. I cannot overstress how grateful we are to him - my fiance had his procedure on Tuesday, came home Wednesday, did have to wear a catheter for a few days, had that removed, and had leakage for a few days after that...and THAT WAS IT. He had no real pain afterward, he was his old self within 2 weeks of surgery with absolutely NO SIGN that he ever had prostate surgery (none whatsoever). This was almost 2 years ago and his PSA's are always 0 now. It is not a 'death sentence', it isn't the end of the world, it is a 2 week inconvenience at worst. Do your homework, find a good doctor (I cannot over recommend our Dr. Scott Miller - Atlanta Urology) and things will be fine - actually better, because you will NEVER have to worry about Prostate Cancer again.

I also wanted to note that the doctors at Duke did say NEVER to do the Hormone route...it never helps.

I hope this offers some help and I wish the very best to you all...

Olee's picture
Olee
Posts: 97
Joined: Nov 2008

I have to agree with you on Dr. Miller,great doctor. After a horrible experience at Emory, where they have the Da Vinci robot but still seem to push open surgery. (maybe because if you look on their site, they state they've been doing Robotic Surgery for Prostate Cancer since June 2008.) Luckily after research I was led to Dr. Scott Miller and from his expertise to his bed side manner I couldn't be happier. The way he treated my wife and I upon our consultation, we sat in his personal office for 1 1/2 hours and discussed as well as asked questions about the surgery, all of this no less at the end of the day. He has always treated me as if I were the first patient of the day, which is more than I ever expect. My care has been managed and each step of the way explained to my wife and I in detail. Even the nurses at Northside Hospital assured me that I made a good choice, and that he treats his patients with the greatest care and the staff loves him. One nurse even told me he was one of the few doctors she ever knew of that actually left his home number to be called in case there was a question about his patient. His expertise was a deciding factor also, he was the first doctor in the state to perform laproscopic cancer sugery on a kidney, first doctor in the state to perform a laproscopic prostatectomy and the first in the state to perform a prostatectomy using the Da Vinci Robot. He performs Da Vinci surgery only and has been doing the surgery since 2003, so his experience and numbers are where they need to be when choosing a surgeon. I do however think that results can vary no matter the expertise. Case in point, I am still experiencing incontinence and I had my surgery on February 19th. I've improved some, but there are some men who have none, and some who had surgery years ago who still have problems. During my post op visit Dr. Miller said he is confident that I will continue to improve. My erectile function is returning just fine and for that I am very grateful. Even Dr. Miller told me before and after the surgery he could not guarantee post-op results as far as side affects, but he could give me an advantage, the goal of the surgery, removing the cancer. He also explained the advantages he could give me through the surgery and how the side affects could be minimized. He has also been very proactive in managing the after surgery problems, giving me advice, asking, answering questions. An appointment was set up for me at his office to meet with a representative that spoke with me about a pump,instead of me having to research a source myself. I could go on, but I'm sure there other men out there that have great doctors as well. I don't think a great doctor is a cure all for prostate cancer, but it's one of the most dangerous weapons you can carry into battle against this enemy.

This is a link to the Da Vinci Site, the video is of a Chicago news reporter who came to Atlanta to see Dr. Miller.
http://davincisurgery.com/procedures/urologic/prostate/davinci_prostatectomy.aspx

Bill91101
Posts: 33
Joined: Apr 2009

good luck to you!

I got the news last Tuesday. Still a little in shock. Thank god my family is so strong!

Beautiful day out!

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

you found the right place Bill. When I got the news I didn't know where to turn,what to do next, etc. Then I found this site and all the guys here, all who are willing to talk to you, share their stories and tribulations. Many of whom are willing to give out addys for one on one conversations (or even phone num) to help in anyway possible. I felt alone and pissed off that this has happened to me. All very normal feelings, If you read anyones threads you will know. I have a surgery date for the 31st of July. I know from the guys here that there is life after cancer. I will survive cancer ( hope I can survive my health care workers)..JK...

Paraplu
Posts: 37
Joined: Feb 2009

Hello, just wanted to let you know I recently went through the same thing. Gleason 3+3 and 4.6PSA and a tough decision to make. My initial thought was take it out and after reading a lot about it I stuck to that decision.
Last Friday I received robotic surgery in Walnut Creek (CA) at Kaiser hospital, Dr. Martinez was my surgeon, very careful as he calls himself, the surgery took 5+ hours and I left the hospital the following morning.

So here I am, at home, sitting with a catheter and a plastic bag by my side and after hearing the biopsy report I can safely say it was the best decision I could make. The biopsy from the entire prostate showed cancer but contained. Due to nerve sparing techniques I had an erection 5 days after surgery (yes with the catheter in, amazing) and all seems to be going real well.

One more week and the catheter comes out and I can't wait. So, all is well, the right decision, feeling better every day, strong, working again, amazing. It's only been a week.

Paraplu

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

Well my Dr called me (himself) today. Said he had a opening for an earlier date. Said he can move my date up to May 22nd. I took it of course , I told him the waiting was the worst. So in one month I will be going in for my procedure.

Paraplu
Posts: 37
Joined: Feb 2009

GREAT. The same thing happened to me. My surgery was planned for May and something opened up in April, so I took it.

Good job Jim, hang in there, it's going to be alright! You are young, healthy, and have great support at home. Stay in touch.

How was Hawaii?

paquitin
Posts: 7
Joined: Mar 2009

Hi There;
I am 56 and recently diagnosed as well.Like you, I'm healthy, athletic. My PSA was 3.0 and I had 2 out of 12 biopsies positive..Gleason score 6. I just had a radical suprapubic prostatectomy. I opted for this procedure after extensive research.I believe, because of my age radiation was not an option for me.The possible side effects,and the fact that it may recurr 10 or so years after was not an accepatable option for me.
I have done well and feel great 12 days after my surgery. I'm walking and doing very well.
You are young in good health and it seems that you have early localized cancer.
You will do well and you will be fine. You got to believe that.
The most important thing is to find a very good surgeon. I live In Arizona but had surgery in New York at Memorial Sloan Cancer Center.
Do your research and then decide what is best for you.
You can always let me know if I can be of help.I am not a surgeon, but I am a physician.

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

Thanks for all your first hand info. I also decided that radiation was not an option for me because of my age. I was told that there would be limited options later if the cancer came back after radiation. Plus, I have had two Drs tell me that I was detected at such an early stage, that this should be the cure I am hoping for. I understand that nothing in life is an absolute, so I go with my eyes open. My biggest hurdle to date is just getting my head around this. I am hoping my Dr will put me on some anti depression meds. Been so active all my life that I worry that so much will change after the surgery. Oh and HAWAII was just what the Dr ordered. Spent the whole 2 weeks doing all the water sports I could fit into the days. And since I will have 6-8 weeks off, because of my work requirements, I am planning on doing some of my recuperative time back in Hawaii. I am sure the sunshine will do me best there. lol... I wonder if I can keep the cath in during the flight, no need to leave my seat then... lol ...

gkoper's picture
gkoper
Posts: 174
Joined: Apr 2009

Sounds like you got yours set up for the 22 of May. Are you getting the Da vinci? Friends who have opted for it tell me its the way to go for contained PC. Keep the faith my friend & do those kegel exercises.
Cheers,
George

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

Hi George, good luck with your surgery on the 21st. Yes I am getting mine on the 22nd with mr Da Vinci at Kaiser in W. L A ... Beverly Hills it looks like. It does seem the way to go.

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

well George, It is down to our last week. I had my pre-op today. Got everything ready for next friday. Looking forward to the time off from work, I think, never had 8 weeks not working. Hopefully this work-a-holic can relax that long...lol... I pray I have as good of results as most on this site have had.
Thanks to all
Jim

hopeful and opt...
Posts: 1282
Joined: Apr 2009

As my handle says, I am hopeful and optimistic for you

Ira

gkoper's picture
gkoper
Posts: 174
Joined: Apr 2009

I did my pre-op yesterday as well Jim. I am a bit anxious since I have had a mysterious upper respiratory problem for 2 weeks now. No symtons except a nagging cough. The chest xray they did should tell why. Was going down to the Keys (Fl.) for a few days of R&R but may have to put that off. I'm waiting for the phone call on the results as I write.
To compound matters, my wife is breaking out with what appears to be shingles. Got to keep moving forward though.
Cheers,
George

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

Well George, I hope the upper respiratory problem gets resolved before your surgery. Will the Dr still perform it otherwise? Hope your wife is doing better also. I am finally looking forward to surgery day, maybe the Prozac is kicking in ...lol... We had some time in the Islands last month, was trying to plan something there after the surgery, but the Dr doesn't want me that far away for awhile. Hopefully in July, before I go back to work in August. I am off from the 21st of May, until Aug 3rd. So we should be able to squeeze in some time after surgery follow ups, and blood work 4 weeks out. But we shall see. All the best to you on the 21st George.
Jim

whubbs
Posts: 77
Joined: Sep 2008

Good luck guys!
Things will work out just fine, be positive and know you've made the right decision.
Follow doctors orders for pre-op and don't be afraid to ask questions.
Let us know how your are doing as soon as you feel up to it.
-Wayne

whubbs
Posts: 77
Joined: Sep 2008

Good luck guys!
Things will work out just fine, be positive and know you've made the right decision.
Follow doctors orders for pre-op and don't be afraid to ask questions.
Let us know how your are doing as soon as you feel up to it.
-Wayne

gkoper's picture
gkoper
Posts: 174
Joined: Apr 2009

Hi Jim...tomorrow I start my weight loss program :)
We went to a party last night where they held a mock prostatectomy on me. Lots of wine made it painless. The chief surgeon was a fellow prostateless friend. The doc he used is the one who will do me...I told him that I will give the doc strict orders that if he messes up I will kill him. Wine will make you say that:)
So onward & upward & gitter done! Goodluck Jim & keep me posted.
Cheers,
George

gkoper's picture
gkoper
Posts: 174
Joined: Apr 2009

The deed was done Thursday & I was released last night. No complications, minimal pain & I'm now dealing with the strap-on cathater. Probably the most annoying part is having a persistant cold virus with congestion & cough. Cough is not good after gut surgery.
But it feel good to be past this first hurdle. How are you doing Jim?
Cheers,
George

RRMCJIM's picture
RRMCJIM
Posts: 149
Joined: Mar 2009

Hey george, same here, had the deed done friday got home sat. Not much pain, taking tylenol, no spasams. Cannot find a comfortable spot with the cath. countdown to removal, that is my next step. Glad to hear you are also doing well George. That cough must really suck big time. All the best
Jim

gkoper's picture
gkoper
Posts: 174
Joined: Apr 2009

Hi Jim,
Good to hear your back home if not back in the saddle yet. Each day gets a little better.
The catheter they sent me home with is pint size. The doc said a bigger night bag might allow bacteria to enter when changed. After 2 nights of nurse Angie (wife) & I getting up every 1.5 hours,I rigged an extension hose that emptys into the gallon size go-lightly bottle. We slept like babies last night. I manage the cough by positioning my body in a wreched but more cough friendly manner. I'm doing lots of walking & yesterday walked over to check a neighbors house (out of town) & saw a fox scamper away. Then I saw about 4 fox pups (at a large shed) staring at me. My wife is taking pictures today.
Its a great day to be alive in central Fl this Memorial day. As I gaze out my window I see the sun peeking through the trees & a hummingbird sating itself at the feeder.
And just think...in a few days we won't have this silly bag strapped to our leg.
Cheers,
George

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