CSN Login
Members Online: 8

Grade 3, an anaplastic astrocytoma

JanetLMcCoy
Posts: 6
Joined: May 2008

My nephew-in-law was diagnosed with an anaplastic astrocytoma, Grade 3, last December. He had surgery at MD Anderson Cancer Center, recovery, rehab (very little was required) and 6 weeks of radiation

He's recovered great, is back at work and driving.

I'm hoping to find someone who has beaten the doctor's timeline diagnosis of 3-5 years. My nephew-in-law is 30 years old and has a wife (my niece) and three-year-old son.

Their very strong Christian faith, great doctors and wonderful family and church family have gotten them through the last 11 months.

Please respond if you are willing to talk about your experiences.

Thank you.

Gerard6
Posts: 6
Joined: Oct 2009

Hi Janet, lovely to get your mail and that you are so understanding. Well I was diagnosed with a Gr 3 8 years ago. Same treatment really. I am very happy to say I think he will be fine. Im 55 yrs now and when it occured they said I had maybe 12 months to live. As I said that was 8 yrs ago. Mine was in the left occipitalm lobe area and with 95 percent resexted and then 6 weeks radiation. So I feel really positive for your Nephew in Law. Hes young and strong and has all that going for him. Good look in the future. Hugs and kisses, Gerard.

jordanmar1
Posts: 2
Joined: Jan 2010

i just came across this lovely webite today and i am very moved with the content. the first blog i read was from janet who is worried about her nephew in law. she first posted her comment on oct08 and i was eager to tell her about my friend scott. he was diagnosed with a grade four astrocytma nearly ten years ago and had remained cancer free until around four months ago. he is currently undergoing chemotherapy and he again is responding very well! i am going to encourage scott to have a look at this website as i think it would be very good for him to keep his spirits up and im sure he would have a lot to offer other cancer sufferers. janet i hope your nephew is doing well.

god bless you all

PBJ Austin
Posts: 346
Joined: Mar 2009

For those who haven't seen my thread entitled "Fast Recovery from AA3, Miracle or Mistake," please take a look at my latest post. My then 25-year-old kid sister was diagnosed with AA3 in March of 2009 and in a year's time she is now cancer free!! Miracles do happen, please do not lose faith. We can win this war against cancer.

Hugs and blessings to all.

roux67
Posts: 1
Joined: May 2010

This November will be the 5 year anniversary of the removal of my AA tumor, grade3. The 30 treatments of computerized laser radiation treatments to the cancer that couldn't be surgically removed went by quickly. My hair, from those radiation treatments, started falling out after 3 weeks of it, but only where the laser beams passed so I was left with a mohawk hairstyle. The temodar pills during radiation and for a year afterwards seemed very tolerable to me. 5 years ago I had just turned 38. After having a seizure, something I had never had before, turned up the tumor with an MRI. Recovery from that seemed easy and then all the other stuff mentioned above have me cancer free for almost 5 years. My next MRI is June 14th. I am assuming it will still be clear. Here is to staying well so I can see my adorable grandaughter, who will be 1 in July, grow up to be a beautiful young woman. Depakote is the anti-seizure med that I am on. Does this make one lose some memory or is it just being in one's forties?

Diablita
Posts: 18
Joined: May 2010

I'll be praying for you and that you will still be cancer free. I just got diagnosed with your same type of tumor this past week, and all I ask GOD is to please let me see my little children grow up ( they are 2 and 4 yrs old ) even if I don't get cured, I ask GOD that with treatments and surgery I can still be around at least until my kiddos are adults.

cushla69's picture
cushla69
Posts: 45
Joined: Dec 2010

I pray the same thing every night Diablita, i know how you feel about ure babies, that seems to make it so much harder. Just try and keep ure faith, i am trying and i will keep u n my prayers

Haley75
Posts: 8
Joined: Aug 2011

I pray for exactly the same I'm 33 and have five fantastic kids aged between 14 and 4 all I want is to see them grow up .. This is a nightmare I hope and pray for good MRI results and the same for you ... This disease is cruel ... X

be473
Posts: 2
Joined: Nov 2010

My husband is also a AA3 survivor. Good job! Memory issues are often a problem for anyone who has had trauma to the brain, and the meds can make it worse. Depending on where you are, you could ask your neurologist to have memory testing. That way they can map out the particular facets of your memory that you are having problems with. Then both use that as a benchmark to judge deteriorization, as well as suggest therapies that may help with builing it back up. My husband has also been struggeling with this, more since the stroke he has from the radio therapy, than the tumours or meds. I feel as if he is making some progress though, and has returned to study while he is working. This has helped. Good luck!

alutiiqmom's picture
alutiiqmom
Posts: 256
Joined: Jun 2011

HI:

Praise be to God! I hope your sister is doing well. thank you, Thank you for the hope you are giving. God Bless you.

333777
Posts: 1
Joined: Aug 2010

My niece Karla was diagnosed with Anaplastic Astrocytoma III on Monday and yesterday the Dr siad it was not localized to one area but spread out over two lobes so the radiation would be over half of her head. No surgery because of how it's spread out. She is 34 with three children. She is scared. And so are we. We are a christian family and will always have hope. It really helps to read positive comments from people that have gone through this type of thing. The Dr in Des Moines is talking with Mayo Clinic Dr's to see if they have any other ideas for treatment for her because of the spreading of it. She is otherwise healthy and has no symptoms at this point. She has a seizure just over a year ago and the Neuro Dr said we'll wait a year and see if it grows. If it does we'll biopsy it. Thay did and that's where we are now.

rokaren5
Posts: 14
Joined: Aug 2010

I'm a little behind your nephew-in-law as I just got diagnosed in July 2010. Biopsy & ressectioning surgery in 8/2010. I just wanted to let you know about an amazing book. It's called "Anticancer A New Way of Life". The doc who wrote it, David Servan-Schreiber, is a brain cancer survivor! He fought it for 15 years and is 7 years clean. With every page I read I have another aha moment. I'll cut and paste from amazon here for you: It's incredible.

In "Anti-Cancer: A New Way of Life," French-born psychiatrist and neuroscientist Dr. David Servan-Schreiber discusses his fifteen-year battle with brain cancer. Although conventional treatments worked initially, the cancer recurred. Fortunately, he has been cancer-free for the past seven years, and he attributes his success to an anti-cancer regimen that, he asserts, boosts the body's natural defenses. Dr. Servan-Schreiber does NOT encourage cancer patients to reject their doctors' advice concerning surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation treatments. However, he does believe that there is nothing to lose and everything to gain by making changes in one's diet, level of physical activity, psychological attitude, and environment.

This book is an informative and eye-opening look at the mechanisms of cancer, explained in a way that a layman can understand. There are many helpful charts, tables, and illustrations that clarify the sometimes technical information about the latest research on the genesis and progression of cancer. The author maps out how rogue cells are nourished and conversely, how they can be starved of the nourishment that they need to multiply. Although researchers have undoubtedly made a great deal of progress, Servan-Schreiber assures us that we have a long way to go before we can declare victory over the many types of cancer that still plague mankind. In addition, he includes well-chosen quotations from literature (such as Tolstoy's "The Death of Ivan Ilyich"), philosophy, and other physicians and scientists to illustrate his points, some of which deal with our fear of dying without having lived a full and meaningful life.

"Anti-Cancer" is a personal, touching, instructive, and thought-provoking. Whether or not the reader is interested in adopting the author's recommendations concerning diet, exercise, meditation, and other lifestyle changes, no one who completes this book will ever think about cancer or about the human body in quite the same way. Servan-Schreiber is not a new-age charlatan who advocates far-out therapies. Everything that he suggests is based on solid and well-documented research, and he includes numerous citations from scientific journals.

Although no one wants to confront a fatal illness, Servan-Schreiber contends that his battle with cancer has had a positive aspect. "By exposing life's brevity, a diagnosis of cancer can restore life's true flavor." Forced for the first time to look into his soul and evaluate his approach to living, he realized that he had been caught up in a treadmill that allowed him little time to appreciate the importance of mind-body equilibrium, inner peace, relationships with loved ones, and personal fulfillment. Everyone, no matter what the state of his or her health, can benefit from this stimulating and provocative work.

MikeP
Posts: 2
Joined: Sep 2010

Hello my brother had a stage 3 brain tumor and went through chemo/radiation biopsy and surgery and now it has been 5 years this past July. he has his ups and downs, but suffers from a lot of chronic pain.... so hang in there and never give up... Thing is tell him to be strong... and no one knows how long someone has to live only God!! Hope this helps

Dannyfic
Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 2010

I was diagnosed with a grade 3 anaplastic astrocytoma in March of 2008. I had the 4 cm tumor removed during a craniotomy. After surgery I started a 42 day cycle of temodar I think 100 something mg a day. I also did 6 weeks of radiation (targeted) twice a day. I took one month off and them did 12 months 5 day cycles of temodar at I think 480mg a day. I am at 3 month intervals for MRI and just had a clean one a few weeks ago. I feel great (aside from the whole reality of it) and suffered no deficits from surgery. They say it usually starts to recur after a year or year and a half. I'm at 2 years 8 months and have my fingers crossed.

KMPonder's picture
KMPonder
Posts: 102
Joined: Dec 2009

Stay well, Danny! So glad to hear this. Hubby just got off Temodar after 10 mos at 450 mg. He'll have MRIs every two months for this first year. We pray the same results of clean MRIs for the next 50 years! :)

sue Siwek
Posts: 281
Joined: Jun 2009

my husband is begining his 11th year from aa 3. temordar did not work for him. i guess i am saying that if temodar no longer works that there are alternatives. my husband has mri's every 4 mos.

KMPonder's picture
KMPonder
Posts: 102
Joined: Dec 2009

So glad to hear he's 11 years out and doing well. Life feels "nearly" normal now in some respects by just having a break from the chemo.

For all those newly diagnosed, keep hope and faith alive through the early part of this. Looking back to 15 months ago, going through all the initial treatments: biopsy, radiation, chemo, monthly chemo, appointment after appointment, it's easy to get discouraged and weary. Treat it like a job - what you must do to survive. Seek out a second opinion if necessary and find the best brain tumor center you can to help you through. We are so grateful to the doctors and staff at Duke, and we'll continue MRIs every two months this year. A 7-hour drive is nothing compared to the quality of life my husband now has again.

I am so proud of the strength and courage my husband has had as he's faced his second round of brain cancer in his 44 years. I know each of you will find the same strength yourselves or for your loved ones to do all you can to get through each day. Truly take this one day at a time. Don't invite worry. Be involved in every aspect of your treatment and options. Ask a zillion questions. Stay strong in the fight! God bless!

alutiiqmom's picture
alutiiqmom
Posts: 256
Joined: Jun 2011

HI KM Ponder-

What type of brain cancer did your husband have? I am sorry for your loss. May God comfort you during this difficult time.

Edna

Jeannie20
Posts: 5
Joined: May 2011

Hi Edna,

I had been in contact with Kim last year, but haven't heard back from her. can you email me please?

jirue001@gmail.com

Hopekathy
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 2010

Where were you treated - at what hospital?

Hopekathy
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 2010

Where were you treated - at what hospital?

KMPonder's picture
KMPonder
Posts: 102
Joined: Dec 2009

HopeKathy,

Were you asking me where my hubby was treated? If so, he was treated at Duke this time.

Since my last post, my husband has suspected radiation necrosis on the optic chiasm. His 10/21 MRI showed the new enhancement, but the 10/22 PET was completely cold. He's lost a lot of vision in both peripheries. He's now on biweekly Avastin treatments. He's tolerating those just fine, thankfully. We go to Duke every two months for MRIs at this stage of the game.

The tried a large dose of steroids for five days the week of Thanksgiving, and he had the darn steroid psychosis again! I am NOT going to allow him to have more high doses of steroids. He has proven twice now (first time after brain biopsy in September of 2009) that he cannot handle them. He has missed what will be 12 days of work because of this, and he didn't miss but three days all year, even while on Temodar through October! I'm so frustrated with his local oncologist for not listening to me when I saw it coming on, that I requested a new oncologist. If ever your loved ones or self need high doses of steroids, please, please educate yourselves about the possibility of psychosis. It can be a very frightening reaction, and the doctors do NOT prepare you for the possibility. (Off soapbox.)

Hubby's so different from most, because this is brain cancer round two, different kind. We know his radiation in 1987 caused his AAs now, and we just pray he'll continue a good qaulity of life, even with the vision issues. He's one remarkable man!

alutiiqmom's picture
alutiiqmom
Posts: 256
Joined: Jun 2011

Hi:

Can I ask you a few questions? Did they get all of your tumor? You had radiation twice a day?

Have all of your MRI's been clean? My daughter had surgery, but they could not get all of her her tumor located in the left frontal lobe. She then did six weeks of radiation, one time a day followed by a year of maintenance chemotherapy which includes temodar.

Her initial MRI was not too clear on whether their was still residual tumor or whether the site was healing? does this sound familiar on this road to recovery?

Thanks.

be473
Posts: 2
Joined: Nov 2010

Hi Janet,
Don't know if this helps, but I have a story of survival way beyond their prognosis!
My husband was diagnosed in 2000 with a AAgrade3. He had it removed and had radiotherapy. He began Chemo (IV) but had to stop, as he had a really bad reaction to it. (Really bad!) Then he was completely tumour free for 5 years. Then 5 months after our son was born it came back. Couldn't operate, so they treated it with a different type of Radiotherapy, a one off... this was not so great, as it grew very quickly. (In hindsight I think they were thinking it was going Grade 4, talking about it moving to other parts of the brain) His original tumour was 7.5cm, and the reoccurrence got to I think from memory about 3cm. After the radiotherapy was a bust, he was put on a 2 year course of Oral Chemo (Tremador) to "control the growth" and attempt to shrink the tumour. After 7 months it disappeared completely, and has been gone ever since (kissing my ear for luck). He has 6 monthly MRI's, but life is as normal. He has suffered a stroke due to a side effect of the second radio therapy. This caused some issues with vision, but other than that you would never know that he was sick. He is currently working and studying to gain a diploma. I am very proud of him, he has a great attitude. So much so that I am writing a book about him, because I believe that his story is one that can inspire others in the same situation.
Two complimentary treatments that we both believe saved his life are Kinesiology and Reike. We did everything the Dr's said and a little bit more... they can't explain it, but who cares. He's here, and that's all that matters!

Hope this is helpful!

KMPonder's picture
KMPonder
Posts: 102
Joined: Dec 2009

Be473,

How old is your husband? So he had radiation twice, like my husband? It is interesting that both our husbands have had vision issues after two rounds of radiation.

I know it is a VERY busy time of the year, but I would love to e-mail with you when we both have time.

I love that your husband is so positive, too. You just have to be.

Happy Holidays!

alutiiqmom's picture
alutiiqmom
Posts: 256
Joined: Jun 2011

Hi:

What do you mean by complimentary treatments? Were they in addition to radiation and chemo?

dduncan
Posts: 1
Joined: Nov 2010

It's been 4 months since diagnosed I'm fighting with
with god help I'm getting better . First Mri after radiattion
therapy .

fireman806
Posts: 2
Joined: Apr 2010

my wife had a Grade III also and hers was the whole right side a outstanding neurosurgeon removed it and it covered half of left side to they did Chemo on it. Now this is her 2nd round with it but keep in mind was first diagnosed in Nov 1998. She is a sleep in the bedroom right now doing fair. She did stroke during her surgery in 1999. So we will tell you just keep the faith the lord brought her thru this. I work in a hospital the doctors there know my wife well they said she should not be here and is they said thats a amazing woman we say no thats the lord working in our lifes

kris4john
Posts: 1
Joined: Jan 2011

My doctor discovered a 'spot' in my right temporal lobe/insula in Aug 2005 (I was 34 y/o male). They watched and waited until 2007 when I started having simple focal seizures. Had a craniotomy Apr 2007 at M.D. Anderson. Diagnosed as AA-III. They removed somewhere between 70-95%...left the tumor portion in my insula. The tumor pre-surgery was about 6 cm. Maybe about 1 cm remained. I had IMRT June - Jul 2007 and we decided not to forgo chemo. I've been on 3 month scans ever since. This past August (2010) they moved me to every 4 months. So I've passed 5 years since a 4 cm 'spot' was discovered and I'll be 4 years post treatment next July (2011). Other than the emotional roller coaster ride...I've been fully functional and able to work full time (USAF Active Duty - they still won't let me deploy).
God is good!
John

momsworld's picture
momsworld
Posts: 135
Joined: May 2010

my daughter is 13 and has AA3. She has had 4 brain surgeries to remove tumor and new tumor growth. Every surgery she has had we were told that she would have left sided weakness. Almost like having a stroke. Every surgery she has come out fine. No major left side weakness or anything. She is back at school and doing good. You are right. GOD IS GOOD.
We have alot of faith that God is with us and taking care of her.

AngelRay2008
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 2011

John, I have been able to do most of what I want to do; I did retire early from my job because it was just too stressful. And, I got a puppy who has enhanced the quality of my life and kept me busy (and from sleeping 24 hours a day). His name is Angel Ray, a miniature long haired dachshund, and he makes me laugh, too. My tumor was very small, and the recurrence was very small (pea size), and my challenge now is to gain weight. The Avastin gives me a little trouble with my stomach, but all in all, I do not have near the problems that some people do.

May God continue to bless you and your family.

Rita

MarkKav
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 2012

John,

Thanks for your story. It's really encouraging for me. Keep going!

Mark

meetad
Posts: 1
Joined: Feb 2011

I was diagnosed with mine in 2002 via MRI while I was pregnant with my son. I had no idea that I had a brain tumor, and the doctors were looking for something else entirely. After my son was born the doctor biopsied the tumor, followed by a complete resection and 18 weeks of radiation therapy. My head is all lumpy now and sometimes my tongue gets thick-feeling when I try to talk, but other than that I have no negative effects and there has been no sign of recurrence. I am extremely fortunate, and proof that these can be beaten. Hang in there!

~Michelle

Rory1987's picture
Rory1987
Posts: 122
Joined: Nov 2009

I may not have AA (but i do have ExtraMedullaryPlasmacytoma with intracranial extension) but Im sharing this to everyone with AA. He has been my hero and inspiration since I started my treatment,

Im gonna share to everyone the story of Mr. George Plym a 40+ year AA survivor and until now he is still alive and is currently the president of Western North Carolina Brain Tumor Support

http://www.virtualtrials.com/survivegeorge.cfm

believe it or not he has survived 11 brain tumor recurrences and a heap-load of radiotherapies

AngelRay2008
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 2011

Hi Janet, I was diagnosed in October 2008 with antiplastic astrocytoma grade III after 2 seizures. I had partial surgery; they removed as much as possible without causing me to have a stroke. After surgery, I had 35 treatments of radiation combined with Temodar capsules. I had no ill effects except for loss of energy. I have many Angels who are constantly praying for me and helping me. God has richly blessed me through my having cancer. Needless to say, it's been very scary for me, my family and friends. I began Avastin in May 09 with infusions about twice/month. I think the Avastin is the drug that really helped me; it blocks the blood flow to the tumor. All of my MRI reports have been stable. One MRI last Oct (2010) showed some recurrence of very small spots, but they had told me to expect some recurrence. Now, I take Temodar capsules at night (80 mg) and Avastin IV infusions every 3 weeks. My local oncologist consults with the Brain Tumor Center at Duke University, and I feel that I'm receiving the greatest care. I do believe that this is all part of God's plan for my life, and that He will carry me through and I will soon be able to enjoy ALL the things I did when I was completely healthy. I'm already amazing the doctors! They didn't expect me to do this well when I was first diagnosed, but I was in pretty decent physical shape when I got sick and I have a strong faith and positive attitude. So, keep the faith and check out Caring Bridge; my site is http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/ritahunt. You may want to set up one for your nephew. Lots of well wishes to you and your family; when cancer strikes, the entire family needs care. Pray without ceasing.

Rita

Hope456
Posts: 9
Joined: Mar 2011

I'm a 45 year old mom diagnosed February 8th with AA Grade 3 and undergoing similar treatment now. Feels great to hear people are being cured. I so want to get back to work and life as normal and feel good again. God has been amazing and my side effects are so few and less than most, but still really need to get back to work and some normalcy. I keep thinking I should be using this time off more productively, but just have no energy - is this normal. I'v had 20 radiation treatments now and 13 to go. Chemo at night by pill. I am also walking miracle and amazing doctors that I don't have more permanent damage. Isn't God good? Any suggestions on maintaining or gaining energy?

KMPonder's picture
KMPonder
Posts: 102
Joined: Dec 2009

My hubby responded extremely well to his radiation (33 treatments) and Temodar for his three inoperable AAs diagnosed in August 2009. He remains doing well from those, but he unfortunately developed a GBM on the optic chiasm we are now treating/fighting.

Has your doctor suggested Ritalin for energy? When hubby returned to teaching post radiation in January 2010, the Ritalin really gave him the energy he needed to get through the day. You've got to rest when you can, but this really did make a noticeable improvement.

Chemo fatigue is something I didn't realize was so serious until we went down this path. It's real, and sometimes rest is the only way to combat it.

I wish you complete healing. Even as my husband endures his third malignant type tumor at age 45, God is most definitely still good!

Hope456
Posts: 9
Joined: Mar 2011

My radiation oncologist actually talked about putting me on ritalin. We were trying just walking more and being more active naturally, but that is not giving more energy. I guess I was trying to avoid another medication, but maybe I should try it. I'm so tired all the time. I would love to be awake more and be more active.

Jeannie20
Posts: 5
Joined: May 2011

Hi Kim,

This is Jeannie I. It has been several months now since we last spoke over the phone. How is your husband doing?

Richard is doing well. Last MRI still showed no signs of the tumor decreasing but thank God it hasn't grown either.
After our next MRI on Monday we are looked into going to MD Anderson. We already have the appointment scheduled.

If I don't hear from you I will try sending you an email.

Hope all is well.

God bless.

nuezdallas
Posts: 3
Joined: Apr 2011

Recently my mom was diagnosed with AA3. My senior year in high school is as good as it gets.. As long as my mom makes it through. I spent months in the hospital.. missing school.. 100$ in gas. My family is strong. That wait of a 7 hour surgery... killed me... i was worried the whole time. I dont know that much about it. But i am doing a project for my anatomy class on this very disease... I waled relay. for the very first time. My life has change dramatically. I would really like to ask all of you questions on how it happened? My moms was out of NO where.
You can contact me at nuez.dallas@hotmail.com
Relay for life really opened my eyes... i know i am not alone on this... I pray for you all.
I go home early from school... to help with my dad. He stays home 24/7. Please keep me updated everyone. Its a scary thing.. im young but ive learned so much responsibility.

Keep Faith

Dallas:)

Hope456
Posts: 9
Joined: Mar 2011

Hi Dallas,

I was diagnosed on Feb. 8th. Don't lose hope. According to my oncologist, this disease is treatable and can be curable. I just finished 34 radiation treatments and my four tumors are decreasing even before they expected them too. I have three kids, 14, 22, and 26. Our faith is what gets us through all of this. Lean on that. Actively read a devotional or your Bible, or a bible study or do youth group. You'll need that support - as well as your mom and dad. For your mom, I would highly recommend Barbara Johnson's book, Stick a Geranium in my Cranium - laughter and humor are key. But also recognize, that there will just be bad days and good days. Now that my I'm on the back side of the treatments, I feel much better. I just started weight training at a gym at my oncologist recommendation and it is making me feel much better. And, I'm getting some strength back in my legs - the steroids just about took it all away. As for how or why she got it, you'll never know is what they are telling me. I only had a few mild symptoms for two weeks before I was violently ill and being admitted to the hospital.

Hang in there and stay strong and positive,

Shelly

Kimberlyann72
Posts: 6
Joined: May 2011

Thank you for that. All I read on the internet is so negative, the statistics etc. it makes me want to quit reading the internet or doing searches. My father was diagnosed with grade III astrocytoma had total resection (I realize some cells are always left) he is undergoing 6 weeks of chemo/radiation (temodar). My dad is 69, he is doing well other than being a bit unsteady on his feet since starting the chemo/radiation. I need hope, I have faith in God. I am scared though. I love him more than my own life.

PBJ Austin
Posts: 346
Joined: Mar 2009

I urge you to please stay off the internet except this site. Much of what you will find is out of date and/or worst case scenarios. When my sister was diagnosed with AA3 I nearly drove myself crazy reading all sorts of grim stuff about AA3. Then I found this site and I finally had hope. My sister went through 6 weeks of radiation which was tough. Then she had about 8 months of chemo (also temador) which wasn't as bad, and in less than a year's time she was in remission!! Of course we can't possibly know how long that remission will last but it's been over a year now since her MRI's came back clear and I am thankful for every day. Don't lose hope.

I_Promise's picture
I_Promise
Posts: 210
Joined: Aug 2011

Dear Hope,

All of my sister's docs (she has aa 3) tell her over and over again: to have more energy, exercise. Exercise is an independent prognostic survival factor (pubmed).
Take care,

Julia

alexof25th's picture
alexof25th
Posts: 1
Joined: May 2011

im in the US Army Infantry and was on my secound deployment when i started having all this pain in my head where i couldnt get off my bed in Iraq thought it was just migraines. i was sent to a bigger Fire base where this Colonel saw me with my head in my hands and asked me a few questions and gave me a cat scan. April 2009 Im told at the age of 25 in Iraq that i have a tumor so i was medevac out to Fort sam houston where i eventually had surgery at Md Anderson and was walking 4 hours after brain surgery smoking outside a cancer treatment center figured i already had cancer. From the moment i found out it was a Anaplastic Astrocytoma Grade 3 and what my chances were i was determined not to make this more difficult on family and friends. I have since completed radiation and chemo and now get MRI's every 3 months. I finally found someone through her mother a breast cancer survivor that i love and loves me. And for the first time im a little scared because I love her so much and dont want her to hurt. im about to retire from the Army and stay in Texas.

DistancerunnerXC's picture
DistancerunnerXC
Posts: 44
Joined: Mar 2011

I am retired USAR..I did have 8 years active duty but nothing like your experience.
I take my wife to MD Anderson..always want her MRI's to go off at Mays Clinic...but lately, they've all been 3rd floor main building...
Man, I like that big waiting room over at Mays..
My wife has GBM4...
Be careful about that radiation...
If the report indicates "flairs" or "treatment effects" tell the doc to watch that close!
I never dreamed radiation treatments could do so much to a person..but it really sent my wife for a loop about a year after the treatments were over....
Best of luck to you!
I think the real secret to health are those mashed potatoes with the peals grounded up in them in the MD Anderson chow hall.

alutiiqmom's picture
alutiiqmom
Posts: 256
Joined: Jun 2011

Hi:

I have seen those very words in my daughters MRI report. What should we be watching for? Please? We are in the middle of this journey and trying to figure out the best plan for our 17 year old girl.

Thanks.

PBJ Austin
Posts: 346
Joined: Mar 2009

Greetings to a fellow Texan!! Or should I say howdy? :-)

Alex, I would like to make an appeal to you in the kindest possible way. My sister was also diagnosed with AA3 in 2009 at the age of 25 and like you, she had surgery at MD Anderson. She was also a smoker. The fact that you have cancer is not a reason to continue smoking, in fact it is all the more reason you should quit. I know it's hard, I've seen my sister struggle with this monkey on her back. The stress of having cancer makes it even harder. But you already know you are prone to cancer so it really is imperative you should stop so you can enjoy life with your new love.

I apologize if you feel I am overstepping my boundaries but just a few days ago I lost a friend to cigarettes. AA3 is not preventable but most lung cancer cases are.

Wishing you and everyone on this board the very best, you are all in my heart and my prayers.

Lifeistooshort
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 2010

Wow, situation sounds like mine almost 9 years ago. My husband was diagnosed with an AA grade 3 in his frontal and temporal lobes 3 days after my son turned 3. Here we are almost nine years later and he is still with us. I am truly convince he will outlive me. He has his issues that affect mostly his quality of life but is still alive and well don't let statistics bother you. My hubby was 30 when diagnosed as well.

micgrace
Posts: 131
Joined: May 2011

Thanks. My wife has just been dxed with same. It was stated to me as a stage 3 glioma (same). Since I have training it couldn't be hidden from me and the neurosurgeon comment on that fact since I asked many pointed professional questions. The worst part is not knowing how long she will be around.

My wifes is mainly in the Left parietal lobe with a small intrusion into the temporal lobe and R hemisphere. Operation is scheduled for Friday for a resection. Estimated removal is 70% due to the depth. All higher cognitive function is absent along with limited movement on the RHS.

alutiiqmom's picture
alutiiqmom
Posts: 256
Joined: Jun 2011

Hi:

My 17 year old daughter was diagnosed with Anaplastic Astrocytoma, grade 3 in February 2011. She had surgery, but they could not remove it all. She then had 6 weeks of radiation with chemo. We are just now beginning the maintenance phase of chemo, consisting of an infustion 2x a month and Temodar for five days of the month.

Her most recent MRI had some concerning areas, so they aren't sure if the treatment is working. Does anyone know any promising experimental treatments? Also, can you share any scary MRI's that actually turned out ok?

We are Christian believers and know that God has his hand on us and our girl, but it sure feels scary at times. :)

Subscribe with RSS
About Cancer Society

The content on this site is for informational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider. Please consult your healthcare provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. Use of this online service is subject to the disclaimer and the terms and conditions.

Copyright 2000-2014 © Cancer Survivors Network