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Stage III-B Large Cell Lung Cancer

DGallaway
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 2006

My husband is 33 yrs old and just diagnosed with Stage III-B large cell lung cancer, We found out during an emergency room visit for chest pains a few weeks ago, Chest pains being the only symptom he had.The mass in his right lung measured over 8 cm by 5 cm,and is considered inoperable at this point, We have 7 beautiful children 6 girls, and 1 boy ages 7 to 15....I could really use some encouraging experiences right now...He started radiation on Monday and will be recieving chemo starting next Monday the 21st concurrently. I would appreciate any input you all can give me. Thank you, god love and protect you all.

stage5survivor
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 2006

I'm not clear why it's considered inoperable or how your husband was staged?
Is he being treated by a licensed physician!!!?
Sorry, I often get wacky when something seems amiss with treatment plans

DGallaway
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 2006

The cancer has moved to the lymph nodes in the upper chest area and considered bulky, The onocologist says unless significant shrinking occurs during rads/chemo concurrently then there is no chance of surgery....I gathered it all came down to bulky verses non bulky, we are still going to talk to a surgeon but the radiologist agrees with the onocologist about surgery .... And as for staging I have read alot about it and the doctor explained it all but im still not sure what defines 3a and 3b ....3a being operable in most cases....Thank you for your post and I think we all get a bit wacky when things seem amiss with treatment plans .....we have already gone through 2 doctors, This one came highly recommended......."We shall see" Thank you again god bless and protect you!!

stage5survivor
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 2006

OK, staging now defined.
There are some who believe trying a little chemo is worth attempting shrinkage BUT, would resect tumor and disect all regional lymph nodes, regardless of shrinkage...I agree.
If considered unresectable, I would want VERY specific explanations as to why.
Historically, surgical intervention of metastatic NSCLC has created the attitude..."What's the use if it's already spread beyond the primary site" ie why bother?
Patients need a good/informed coach to moderate their treatment plans..."Do NOT go gently into that good night" or your physicians consultation room!

Stage5Survivor(4 was taken)

DGallaway
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 2006

Trust me we are not going to take this lying down, We are exploring all of our options, I have barely left this computer since diagnosed, How can I help him if i know nothing about the disease. Anyhow I think we have great backup as we go through this, His sister is a nurse and very outspoken ....If she thinks something is amiss you better believe someone if not everyone knows our concerns,fears ect....Im guessing you had surgery in an advanced stage? I would really like to hear more about it ....our email is cricket_lighter2004@yahoo.com if you would like to share....Thanks again for your concern and input .........god be with you

Plymouthean's picture
Plymouthean
Posts: 264
Joined: Jan 2004

Hi. I'm a 4+ year survivor of nsclc, 3B. I was diagnosed in May, '01 as inoperable/incurable. I was 67 years old at the time, and obviously, I didn't have the physical resources of a 33 year old. My tumor was 4.5 x 5.8 x 7.7 cm. I was treated with three rounds of chemo (1 six-hour day followed by two 1 1/2 hour days, then three weeks off, times 3). I had concurrent radiation for a total of fifty six treatments (5 days/week, weekends off). The tumor was reduced by 75%, and was removed surgically, along with the upper lobe of my right lung. Two months later, I had ten radiation treatments (5 on, 2 off) and twelve weekly 1 1/2 hour chemo treatments. I am approaching the "magic five years" since diagnosis, and I am cancer free. Don't listen to statistics. Don't believe a poor prognosis. Do get involved in your husband's treatment. Ask questions of the doctor. Learn as much as possible about the disease, so that you can make better decisions about treatment. Above all, have a positive attitude. Believe that he can beat this. Your family is in my prayers.

DGallaway
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 2006

Plymoutheam Thank You So Much for you encouraging words ..... You just do not know how much they mean to me. I am so glad you are doing well. This gives me the hope I have been lacking since researching this type of lung cancer in the late stages, My husband is strong willed and bodied, I pray every night that god will see us through this...And he sends angels like you to reasure us all things are possible.... Thank You So much for your kind words of encouragment, God Bless you and keep you well!!
Donna, Jeremy& Family

jalexander
Posts: 31
Joined: Nov 2003

Hi there. I'm another IIIB success story. I am 44 now and was diagnosed a little over 3 years ago. At first they thought it was pneumonia, then finally determined cancer. After short rounds of radiation and chemo they decided to take out the two tumors in my right lung along with whatever part of the lung was required for a clean surgical margin. Turns out they had to take the whole right lung. Did post-op chemo with Gemzar and have been cancer free ever since. I get checked every 3 months with some kind of scan or xray. Last weekend I went snow skiing and never got out of breath once. I have been working very hard the last 3 years in pulmonary rehabilitation to be able to keep up with my 14 year old son. Went on a week long canoe trip in the Canadian Boundary Waters last summer. Carried my own canoe over 15 or so portages. Some were a mile long or more. Don't tell anyone but I paid extra for a lighter canoe (it only weighed 55 lbs). Anyway, my point is that attitude is everything and never lose hope. You can email me at this account if you want any specific encouragement. I'm happy to share. I check the email once a week or so. Best of Luck to your husband!!!!

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