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audralou
Posts: 1
Joined: Mar 2004

I was 29 when I was diagnosed with colon caner. They took my whole large intestines and did a hysto on me as well to prevent the spread. I had my surgery in Oct 2003 and they told me I would be back to work on 5-6 wks. Well here it is March 2004 and I'm no way able to go back to work yet. They did not give me a bag so I am constantly running to the bathroom. I go any where from 10-15 times a day. They said everything would be controled by my diet.BIG FAT LIE. I am very strict to my diet and it doesn't do anything for me. I just came back from the dr.s today with this horrible pain in my abdomin which until now they act like they have no idea why I have this pain. But then I am reading some of the other notes and some of you say that this pain is normal. Thank God cause I thought I was going crazy. They have me on so many pain pills and just kept saying they couldn't figure out what was wrong with me. Wow what a relief. So I'm not the only one with these problems. They tell me I'm cancer free now. So I'm just trying to take care of me and my family.

novatocabruce
Posts: 19
Joined: May 2002

I don't know a lot about your particular circumstances, so will do my best with general information. I had stage III, and they supersized it.

Your body has been through hell. Assuming you lost some of your colon and rectum, you now have missing parts. Over time (like a year or more) you'll get more use from it. . .but it won't be the same.

Diet will have an impact, but isn't the whole story. You'll probably need to get antidiarreals to help slow the system down. The more you put in, the more will go out. It's almost as simple as that.

For me, my surgery was nearly two years ago. If I eat something like pizze, I pay for it. . .big time. My advice is to try living with "eating" less. Some things will bind you up. Some things will go through you. . . but you're still early in the process.

Oranges are really good for the system. Fatty foods aren't. I suppose we all have our own sensitivities. . . .so try to cut yourself some slack.

If you want to email me. . .feel free.

It will take time. . .but it's worth it. Sure beats the alternative (IMHO)

Lastly, I can't speak to the pain. I just know that the more you make the system work, the more it kinda rebels.

Take care, and take notes of what you're eating.

Be well,
Bruce

shmurciakova's picture
shmurciakova
Posts: 910
Joined: Dec 2002

Geez, I am sorry to hear about your slow recovery! I can tell you what I know of the anatomy of the colon. The large intestine is the area of the colon that sucks the water out of your "poo". So clearly, if you have had your large intestine removed then you will have the runs. I cannot believe your docs did not prepare you for that. Your body probably will compensate to some degree over time, but the farther down towards the rectum your resection is, the less of this problem you/ a person would have. Just try to be grateful that you are cancer free! Seriously, I am sure there are many people here who would prefer the runs to cancer. Have you tried taking something to "bulk up" your stools? Like psyllium? Just a thought.

bryancarson's picture
bryancarson
Posts: 47
Joined: Jan 2004

I know the feeling. I only had a partial colectomy and thought I was going to the bathrooom a lot! I had a colostomy all during my treatment then had it reversed in October of 2003. My body still isn't used to only 24" being removed. My diet is much different now, but still my bowls don't know what to do sometimes. The alternative is to have your doc put in a colostomy while you're bowls get used to what's going on, especially if you are doing chemo. That 5FU gives you runs like nobody's business. The colostomy can be temporary and I was thankful for it, but at the same time couldn't wait to get rid of it. So, I've had both, and have been thankful for both. Good luck!

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