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Anyone familiar with this?

sharynann
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2003

My hubby talked to his Dad's chemo therapist yesterday to find out exactly what treatment they are going to do. She said that they are going to give him 5-fu and oxaliplatin. This is how they are going to do it. When he goes home from the hosp. (recovering from colostomy), they are going to let him rest up for a week or so then he will go back in to the hosp. and they will hook him up to a pump that will feed it in to him for 22 hours. Is anyone familiar with this method? I guess I just assumed he'd do the out patient thing like others do. She said they are finding this is easier on some patients. Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks, Sharyn

spongebob's picture
spongebob
Posts: 2600
Joined: Apr 2003

Sharynann -

That's a normal procedure. The fannypack routine will deliver chemo over 5 days, right? Then he'll be off for what 4-6 weeks? It is my understanding that this is a more "gentle" regime than the weekly "outpatient" schedule you may be more familiar with. I had the weekly regime, but saw plenty of fannypackers.

Did any of you semicolons out there do the fannypack routine?

Best regards

- SpongeBob

sharynann
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2003

No actually, they are putting him in the hosp. and delivering the chemo over 22 hours. My hubby said that they never called it a "fanny pack" so he assumed they were just hooking him up to an IV. I hope they won't have to wait too long before they start this. It has been 12 days since his colostomy and he still hasn't been able to eat anything. About 3 days after he had it, they started him on clear liquids (jello and broth), he did o.k. with that and then they gave him tomatoe soup and pudding the next day and he got sick. So they had to put the tube back in and now it's like starting all over. We thought tomatoe soup seemed like a stupid thing to start him on. Seems like it would be too much acid in his stomach. What do I know!? Anyway, that's why he is in the hosp. so long. Sorry to ramble, it's just been frustrating and if time isn't on his side, we are just anxious for him to get started on his chemo. Thanks for the info. Sharyn

StacyGleaso's picture
StacyGleaso
Posts: 1246
Joined: Mar 2003

Hi Sharynann,
Prior to my surgery, I had 6 weeks of chemo and radiation. The chemo was fed continuously through the port-a-cath and held in the fanny pack around my waist. Showering was interesting, as you need to keep it dry. It pays to invest in a shower head which is a hose-like device. Then, every week, I would visit the oncologist to get the new pack of chemo. Painless, honestly.

Hope I helped,

Stacy

sharynann
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2003

I'm not sure if it's the fanny pack. They didn't call it that. Just said that he would be in the hospital and have it delivered over a 22 hour period. My husband assumed it was through IV. I guess We just hope for what ever is easiest on him. Thanks for the information. As for a shower head, I think they already have that kind.
Thanks, Sharyn

jjho
Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 2003

how is the chemo going? my mom was on oxliplatin and 5fu. i might be of help.

sharynann
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2003

They haven't started his chemo yet. They want him to recover from his colostomy. So far, he has been in the hospital for 12 days. How did your Mom do with these chemo drugs? Thanks, Sharyn

acbrock
Posts: 1
Joined: Sep 2003

I was diagnosed with stage 4 colon wth met in the liver and bone in Dec. I had a colonostomy on dec.13 and began chemo Dec.26th. I am still taing chemo and have just changed to a diff. protocol. But I began with Oxolaplatin (eloxatin) with Luekavorin on day 1; took a fanny pack home that had 5f-u in it that ran for 22 hrs. Day 2- went in for Luekavorin and then home on the pack again with 5-fu for another 22 hrs. Day 3- I was able to be disconnected from the treatment and the needles out of the Port. It sounds like your husband has only an IV. I would guess that this is the reason to keep hem in hospital for close watch of his viens during infusion- since he has been so ill from the surgery go with the protocol they give you. I bet it will be temporary. I was very ill too but followed Dr. orders and have doen very well. My protocol was every 14 days. The first week during treatment I did not feel so great, mainly tired and flu like. I began treatment on Mon. and was usually able to be at my kids events at school on Friday nights, and church on Sunday. The whole next week felt very good and could do things around the house and short outings. By March the oxolaplatin had killed all cancer cells and all tumors in liver and bone were gone. I have remained on treatment because my cancer type is very aggressive. It is now trying to come back (after 9 months on oxolaplatin) so Dr. has just changed me to comptasar, 5-fu luekavorin. I pray for good results. This is a 1x per week treatment and some easier but in some ways harder. God bless you. Write back if I can help. acbrock

sharynann
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2003

Thankyou so much for taking the time to reply. You have helped more than you know. It is actually my Father in law that is Ill. My husband and his siblings and Mom are so consumed with being with him all the time that they don't have any energy to research this disease. That is where I come in. I am so glad that I found this place. It has helped them indirectly because I tell them all the stories about the stage 4 survivors here. When we first heard about his cancer spreading and the words "terminal" and "incurable", it was as if he died that day. We got somewhat over the initial shock and now are putting all our energy into helping him. He is a person with a very good attitude so I'm sure that will help him in this fight. It is so good to hear that you are still here. It gives me hope for my FIL. Thanks again, Sharyn

cheer3's picture
cheer3
Posts: 106
Joined: May 2003

I had stage IV cancer with liver mets,positive lymphs. I had a Rt. colectomy, six weeks later I had a liver resection(60% removed) with enternal pump placed with cathereter into the artery in the liver, to be used for chemo later.After six week recovery, I had Port A Cath placement started Chemo that day. I was on 5FU/Leucovorin 5 days every four weeks for 10 months.I was also on FUDR/Decadron, via Hepatic pumpover 2 weeks and given every 6 to 8 weeks. This inflamed my liver causing lots pain, and liver function all out of normal range.I had every side effect listed for each type, I tried to keep positive attitude,I so much wanted to recover. I had my test done after the chemo was completed and was found too be cancer free in August 2003.
I wanted to share this with you, perhaps it will help you feel encouraged.

Chrisswife
Posts: 50
Joined: May 2003

My husband had 5FU/Leucovorin/Oxiplatin via a pump. I remember he felt fluish and very fatigued. The Oxiplatin affected his nerve endings and gave him an increased sensitivity to cold but it passed in less than a week. He had his colostomy last month and is still dealing with issues there - slow heal time due to radiation and infection. The UOA website is a very helpful resource as well: http://www.uoa.org/discussion/genboard0309/
Also - the shower head idea mentioned earlier is a good way to cleanse the bottom area after colostomy surgery if they have left the wound open for drainage. The water pressure will facilitate drainage and healing - just don't use too much pressure. Good luck.

pattieb
Posts: 176
Joined: Mar 2003

In the beinning of my treatment I also had camposar with 5fu after that was over my ct showed two more small things on my pelvis so they put me on the infusion pack with 5fu along with rads for another 30 days which so far has done the trick. It sounds like they are going to do the 5fu in the 22 hours which I also have heard of but from what I understand that is a more agressive treatment. Like Stacy said taking a shower proved to be quite a challange, but my cat liked the tubing and I had to have it replaced 3 times because he chewed it in half lol. Godd luck and keep us informed o how he is doing.

sharynann
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2003

I know when they told him that there wasn't anything they could do surgically, they did say that they were going to try a more aggressive chemo treatment. So maybe that's why they feel he should be admitted to the hosp. for it. I just hope he is up for it. I know he is tired of being sick. Thanks for your input. It helps to hear everyones experience. Sharyn

sharynann
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2003

When you say slow healing time due to radiation it makes me wonder if that is what my FIL is dealing with. He had his colostomy 2 weeks ago and is still in the hosp. He had radiation and chemo back in July to try to shrink the tumor (didn't work). The reason he is just now having his colostomy is because he went through triple bypass heart surgery about 6 weeks ago, so it put his colon surgery on hold for a while. The main reason he is still in the hosp. is because he has had trouble eating solid food but the cancer has also spread to his stomach so I can't imagine that anything would agree with him. I just hope they can get him recovered enough to accept the chemo treatments. Thanks for your input. Sharyn

Chrisswife
Posts: 50
Joined: May 2003

I'm sure that you are right that your FIL's lengthy hospital stay is because of his inability to tolerate solids but the complications of radiation and healing is something you may want to file away in your memory banks - as a caregiver, I wish I'd had the information going in.

Like your FIL, my husband had chemo/rads first to shrink the tumor, then had surgery in August. The radiation has damaged the tissue to such a degree that it is unable to regenerate healthy tissue and heal properly. He is seeing a wound care specialist who is helping him enormously.

I don't want to give you more to worry about, like I said it's just information I wished that I had been given up front so we could have gotten a handle on the situation sooner.

Your FIL and family have are lucky to have such a thorough and passionate caregiver. Remember to take care of yourself too. God bless.

M.

wildcat's picture
wildcat
Posts: 40
Joined: Apr 2002

I have a close friend who had a treatment that maybe what you are talking about. It is actually a flushing of the stomach with chemo. It takes about 24 hours. It is a tough treatment but it did wonders for him. I recovered from Stage III just over a year ago but his had gotten into his kidney and stomach.

sharynann
Posts: 28
Joined: Sep 2003

They did say that his treatment was going to be aggressive, which in our minds means it will be tough. Did your friend have this only once? How is he doing today? It's such a tough thing to hear that this will only give my FIL more time and won't cure him. Thanks for your input. Sharyn

kjbascom02
Posts: 3
Joined: Jun 2003

I received preoperative continuous infusional chemotherapy for 5 days and six weeks of preoperative radiation therapy in order to shrink my tumor off my pelvic wall in order to make me a candidate for surgery.

The only side effect I experienced from the chemo was blackening and hardening of the veins in my arms and this was taken care of by implanting a port-a-cath in my chest which directly fed the chemo to a main artery.

When they performed surgery, they found that not only did my T3 tumor shrink it was completely obliterated and I required no further surgery, which was very good news considering two days prior I was told I was going to receive a total pelvic exteneration (removal of all pelvic organs).

I also want to mention that I contacted an ostomy organization and I talked with several of their members and not one of them had anything negative to say about having a colostomy. startingly, a couple of them even prefered to to the "old way of doing business" so if this is something your father-in-law has to have, it won't necessarily ruin his life as he knows it. Everything he does now, he'll do then, except sit down to go the bathroom.

My heart is with all of you. Good luck.

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