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Stem Cell Transplant Questions

hollynn
Posts: 6
Joined: Apr 2002

Hi all!
Ok, I admit; I don't have Leukemia. I'm from the Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma section. But. I came over here to wonder if any of you could possibly help me out. I'm facing an un-related stem cell transplant shortly, and upon release from the hospital, I have to live in the area for 3 months, and my mother is staying with me. I'm 19, a Jr. in college, and she is 41, and a License Practical Nurse, with a husband, and 4 girls, ages 19, 19, (twins), 16, and 13. ANY tips on surving this, such as what to bring, what not to bring, things to do, would be so appreciated! Thanks,
Holly
Hollynn_007@hotmail.com

Roswell3
Posts: 3
Joined: Apr 2003

Holly,
I have acute myeloid leukemia and just had a stem cell transplant. I'm not sure what you mean by an un-related stem cell transplant, but I know there are two kinds of transplants, your own stem cells or those of a donor. I had the auto transplant, using my own stem cells. Basically your blood is drawn out on a machine similar to a dialysis machine and separated into red blood, stem cells and platelets. It's painless and takes about 2 hours. If you are getting stems cells from a donor, there is a chance you will get host-versus-graft-desease. This is where your donor stem cells attack the organs in your body. This can be serious and if you have checked any cancer web sites, you should know there is a small chance of death, but very small. To survive the transplant, just keep a positive attitude, continue doing your normal daily routine as much as you can - you will tire easily after the transplant - and ask any and all questions you think of. My doctors at Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, NY were more than willing to discuss all the benefits and risks of my transplant and never thought any of my questions were silly or frivilous. Good luck.
reynolds@bluemoon.net

vjeffery
Posts: 1
Joined: May 2004

I had a stem cell transplant in Oct. 2002. My husband stayed with me. We did all kinds of crazy things. We would look up people we knew in the phone book and drive around until we found their homes. Fatigue is probably the biggest thing that I had to deal with. Bring very comfortabel clothing. Like joggin suits and soft sweaters. Most of the time I wore pajamas. Anything for comfort. I embroidered dish towels. but my husband said that i slept most of the time. Just don't expect things to get better too fast. I am still trying to build my stamina and some days I just crash. Go into the transplant with a positive attitude and you will do okay.

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