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Post bonemarrow transplant for CML

grandmahat
Posts: 4
Joined: Apr 2002

It has been almost five years and I still require rest before and after an outting. I also can't talk about even flowers or the weather without crying.

rebecca21
Posts: 5
Joined: May 2002

hi my name is rebecca, i am going in for my bone marrow transplant the end of this month, my brother is my doner, and i really want to ask someone questions who went through a tranplant,

angel7296
Posts: 6
Joined: May 2002

Hi Rebecca. I went through a bone marrow transplant 6 years ago. My brother was also my donor and he was a perfect match. To prepare you for the transplant, the doctors would have you go through a full body irradiation. For me it was twice a day for four days in which my body was exposed to x-rays. Afterwards I was given chemotherapy to ensure that the last of my cancerous bone marrow was eliminated. During this period you'll start to lose all of your hair on your body. In order to minimize the shock this could cause, especially if you have long hair, it's better to have it cut really short before you go into the hospital. That's what I did. Because of the chemotherapy and radiation, you will also lose your sense of taste and won't be able to keep any solid food down. But you can have those fortified drinks like Ensure to keep up your nutrition. Also sucking on hard candy like sourballs and drinking ginger ale helps with the nausea. The actual transplant was done in the isolation room where they injected the donor bone marrow into me through the broviac catheter the doctors inserted into my chest after I was admitted into the hospital. The donor marrow know exactly where it's supposed to go as soon as it's injected. Then the doctors monitor you to make sure that everything works out perfectly. They would also make you comfortable so that the transition from being in isolation 'til the time you get out won't be so bad. But PLEASE, under no circumstances, allow anyone to come into your isolation room with any sort of communicable diseases (colds, flu, measles,etc.) no matter how much you want to see them and vice versa! During this period between the time you start the preparation process, the actual transplant, and your convalescence, you will have absolutely no immune system until the donor marrow takes hold. Even the slightest sneeze would be fatal so please be careful. When my borther the donor wanted to see me and he had a skin rash, I told him that to not even see me until it was completely gone with proof from his doctor. Also they will have a color tv with a video player in the room in case you want to see movies. My suggestion is to get a lot of comedies. laughter is the best medicine. The more positive you are about your recovery, the better are your chances to recover. It's been six years for me and when I tell people I'm a leukemia survivor, they don't believe it. I hope that what I wrote here helps. may the Lord bless you and keep you always. Your friend and fellow survivor, Angel7296

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