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My story through an open letter to myself

An open letter to myself.....

 

Dear Silv….It’s Silv!!

I am writing to you from 5mths into the future.

You are freaking out right now. It’s the 20th of October 2016.

 

 Today is not a good day. 

 

You have been told you have cancer.

 

Right now, you are crumbling on the bathroom floor hyperventilating. You’re scared. You’re confused. You don’t quite know what to make of it all, but I want to reassure you, that you are going to be ok!!

 

My story through an open letter to myself

An open letter to myself.....

 

Dear Silv….It’s Silv!!

I am writing to you from 5mths into the future.

You are freaking out right now. It’s the 20th of October 2016.

 

 Today is not a good day. 

 

You have been told you have cancer.

 

Right now, you are crumbling on the bathroom floor hyperventilating. You’re scared. You’re confused. You don’t quite know what to make of it all, but I want to reassure you, that you are going to be ok!!

 

nettlemansh's picture

deer hunter interruptus on opening morning in Michigan

My prostate surgery was on Nov15,2002, opening day of deer hunting in Michigan. I was prepped and setting on the operating table when the doctor walked in late and did not have a deer hanging. in October I had a second biopsy taken and a small sample was detected. After surgery I was retested every 2 weeks and then a month went by and retested once a moth, final was lengthened to every six month. Each test PSA was not detectable. In 2006 the VA hospital during a physical took a PSA test and there was a reading that I was not familiar with, when I asked the doctor he just shrugged off. When my urologist found out about it the flags went up. I had 39 radiation treatments and the following summer had 9 more. Went on the Luprin shot schedule for 3 years and my psa was down but never undetectable. Next step was castration and now my PSA is at 28 as of 1/30/2017. I feel fine and am beginning to believe that the PSA test means nothing. I will be going to a different urologist 2/142017 and following up with the cancer center in Phoenix as soon as I can get an appointment. I do a lot of praying and believe T Lord will give me strength to overcome.

joberry's picture

be brave to survive

Dear comrades, 

Welcome to the month of February.

As we begin the second month of the year, your best days are just beginning.

Your best dreams are coming to pass now.

I see you moving to a higher level of impact and effectiveness.

This month, ideas that will supernaturally turn your life around will flow into your mind.

Receive that idea that will terminate your struggles forever.

Do have an amazing February.

 

joberry's picture

be brave to survive

The management of cancer in Nigeria has remained a national scandal. It is estimated that over 100,000 Nigerians are diagnosed with cancer yearly, while about 80,000 die from the disease due to government’s lackadaisical attitude. The country’s cancer death ratio of 4 in 5 affected persons is one of the worst in the world. In the face of the grim statistics, Magdalene Iyamu Cancer Foundation and it's convener  spoke to some breast cancer survivors. To the survivors, the challenge of getting treatment for cancer is a major problem .

Flamelilly

joberry's picture

be brave to survive

There are warning signs, but not early warning signs.
Cervical cancer often presents no symptoms in its early stages, which is why it is often referred to as a “silent killer.” But as the disease progresses, warning signs may present themselves. Examples include pelvic pain, abnormal bleeding, painful urination, unusual discharge, abnormal menstrual cycles, pain or bleeding after sex, anemia, urinary incontinence, and back pain. If you experience any of these symptoms, contact your doctor right away.

joberry's picture

be brave to survive

In some parts of African especially in Nigeria, many women believe that breast cancer is a disease of the affluent. A case in point is that of Bose,a primary school teacher in Ijebu Ode,Ogun State,who in 2012 felt some lumps around her left breast and chose to ignore them. But when asked some years later upon hospitalisation why she chose to ignore the lumps,her response was as predictable as that of some other women out there: "I chose to ignore them because I never imagined myself having breast cancer.

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